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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL BATTLE OF BRITAIN PRINTS BY TITLE
Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC (deceased) - Art prints and originals signed by Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC (deceased)

Peter Dunning-White

Peter Dunning-White

27 / 12 / 2008Died : 27 / 12 / 2008

Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC (deceased)

Joining 601 Squadron in 1938, Peter Dunning-White was called up to full-time service in August 1939, being posted to 29 Squadron in May 1940, then a few weeks later to 145 Squadron at Westhampnett, flying Hurricanes. He was soon in action over the Channel, sharing in the destruction of an HeIll on 18 July. Transferring to 615 Squadron in March 1941, on 15 April his victory over an Me109 confirmed him as an Ace. In 1942 he was attached to 409 Squadron RCAF, and then to 255 Squadron on Beaufighters. He went to North West Africa with this squadron, being made Flight Commander in March 1943. In July 1944 he was posted to 100 Group, Bomber Command. Sadly, he died on 27th December 2008.

Items Signed by Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC (deceased)

 The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England.  It wa......Those Valiant Few by Robert Taylor.
SOLD OUT
The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England. It wa......NOT
AVAILABLE
 The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England.  It wa......Those Valiant Few by Robert Taylor. (AP)
SOLD OUT
The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England. It wa......NOT
AVAILABLE
 The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England.  It wa......Those Valiant Few by Robert Taylor. (B)
SOLD OUT
The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England. It wa......NOT
AVAILABLE
 The long balmy summer days of 1940 provided perfect flying weather for the vast armadas of Luftwaffe bombers and fighters wreaking havoc over the southern counties of England. As summer wore on the enemy stepped up their attacks on airfields, radar ......
Tommy Leader by Robert Taylor. (AP)
SOLD OUT
The long balmy summer days of 1940 provided perfect flying weather for the vast armadas of Luftwaffe bombers and fighters wreaking havoc over the southern counties of England. As summer wore on the enemy stepped up their attacks on airfields, radar ......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC (deceased)

Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC (deceased)

Squadrons for : Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.145 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 15th May 1918
Fate : Disbanded 15th October 1957
Polish

Diu noctoque pugnamus - We fight by day and night

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.145 Sqn RAF

No.145 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.255 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 25th July 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th April 1946

Ad auroram - To the break of dawn

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.255 Sqn RAF

No.255 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.29 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 7th November 1915

Impiger et acer - Energetic and keen

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.29 Sqn RAF

No.29 Sqn RAF

No 29 Squadron was formed at Gosport on 7 November 1915 from a nucleus supplied by No 23 Squadron, and after training moved to France in March 1916 as the third squadron to be fully equipped with fighters. Its DH2s were engaged in escort duties to protect the slow and vulnerable reconnaissance aircraft over the Western Front ,By late 1916 the DH.2 was outclassed by new German fighters, but No. 29 kept its pushers until March 1917, when it was re-equipped with Nieuport 17s. These were replaced with later Nieuport types, such as the Nieuport 24bis, as these became available. Due to a shortage of the Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5a the squadron retained its Nieuports until April 1918, being replaced by SE5As, which were used for the rest of the war on fighter and ground -attack missions. After a short period in Germany, the squadron Squadron was reduced to a cadre and in August 1919 returned to Spittlegate in the UK, in August 1919 where it was disbanded on 31 December 1919. The squadron was reformed on 1 April 1923, initially equipped with Sopwith Snipes. These were replaced by Gloster Grebes in January 1925, In turn, these were replaced by the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin IIIA in March 1928 and Bristol Bulldogs in June 1932. In March 1935, the squadron received two-seater Hawker Demons, which it operated until 1938. This included service in Egypt from October 1935 to 1936, during the Abyssinian crisis. The squadron also operated a few old Fairey Gordons for night patrols in Egypt. No 29 began the Second World War with its Blenheims, which at the period operated as day fighters – especially on convoy protection patrols. From June 1940 it became a night fighter squadron, receiving some of the first Beaufighters in November, though it was February 1941 before the squadron was fully equipped with the new fighter. Various marks of the de Havilland Mosquito were flown by the squadron from May 1943 culminating in the Mosquito NF30. From the middle of 1944 most of the squadron’s missions took it over the continent. The Mosquitoes continued to serve until replaced by Meteors in August 1951 at Tangmere. In January 1957 the squadron Squadron moved north, first to Northumberland and then in July 1958 to Scotland, conversion to Javelins taking having taken place in November 1957. In February 1963, No 29 was moved to Cyprus and in December 1965 went detached to Zambia for nine months on detachmentduring the Rhodesian crisis. In May 1967 the squadron Squadron returned to the UK to become are-equip with Lightnings squadron, disbanding on 31 December 1974. No 29 reformed at Coningsby as a Phantom squadron on 1 January 1975. A detachment was provided for the defence of the Falklands as soon as the airfield at Stanley was capable of operating Phantoms at the endin August of 1982. This became No 23 Squadron in March 1983 The Squadron swapped its Phantoms for Tornado F3 fighters in 1987 remaining at Coningsby until disbanded in October 1998. Five years later, the squadron was reformed, this time as the Typhoon operational conversion unit (OCU) based at BAE Systems' Warton airfield. In April 1987, No 29 Squadron became the first operational squadron to be equipped with the Tornado F3, deploying to Saudi Arabia after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in August 1990 and flying throughout Operation DESERT STORM in the air-defence role. The Squadron was again disbanded in October 1998.

No.409 Sqn RCAF


Country : Canada
Founded : 17th June 1941
Fate : Disbanded 1st July 1945

Media nox meridies noster - Midnight is our noon

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.409 Sqn RCAF

No.409 Sqn RCAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.601 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 14th October 1925
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of London (Auxiliary)

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.601 Sqn RAF
No.601 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.615 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st June 1937
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of Surrey (Auxiliary)

Conjunctis viribus

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.615 Sqn RAF

No.615 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Beaufighter




Click the name above to see prints featuring Beaufighter aircraft.

Manufacturer : Bristol
Production Began : 1940
Number Built : 5564

Beaufighter

BRISTOL BEAUFIGHTER The Bristol Beaufighter was a Torpedo Bomber and had a crew of two. with a maximum speed of 330mph and a ceiling of 29,000 feet. maximum normal range of 1500 miles but could be extended to 1750 miles. The Bristol Beaufighter carried four 20mm cannon in the belly of the aircraft and upto six .303in browning machine guns in the wings. it could also carry eight 3 -inch rockets, 1605 lb torpedo or a bomb load of 1,000 lb. The Bristol Beaufighter first flew in July 1939 and with some modifications entered service with the Royal Air Force in July 1940. In the winter of 1940 - 1941 the Beaufighter was used as a night fighter. and in March 1941 the aircraft was used at Coastal Command as a long range strike aircraft. and in 1941, the Beaufighter arrived in North Africa and used as a forward ground attack aircraft. The Bristol Beaufighter was used also in India, Burma and Australia. A total of 5,564 Beaufighters were built until production in Britain finished in 1945, but a further 364 were built in Australia for the Australian Air Force

Hurricane




Click the name above to see prints featuring Hurricane aircraft.

Manufacturer : Hawker
Production Began : 1936
Number Built : 14533

Hurricane

Royal Air Force Fighter, the Hawker Hurricane had a top speed of 320mph, at 18,200 feet and 340mph at 17,500, ceiling of 34,200 and a range of 935 miles. The Hurricane was armed with eight fixed wing mounted .303 browning machine guns in the Mark I and twelve .303 browning's in the MKIIB in the Hurricane MKIIC it had four 20mm cannon. All time classic fighter the Hurricane was designed in 1933-1934, the first prototype flew in June 1936 and a contract for 600 for the Royal Air Force was placed. The first production model flew ion the 12th October 1937 and 111 squadron of the Royal Air Force received the first Hurricanes in January 1938. By the outbreak of World war two the Royal Air Force had 18 operational squadrons of Hurricanes. During the Battle of Britain a total of 1715 Hurricanes took part, (which was more than the rest of the aircraft of the Royal air force put together) and almost 75% of the Victories during the Battle of Britain went to hurricane pilots. The Hawker Hurricane was used in all theatres during World war two, and in many roles. in total 14,533 Hurricanes were built.

Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 19th April
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
19April1941Former New Zealand Battle of Britain pilot, P/O E. W. G. Churches of 74 Squadron, was Killed.
19April1970Former British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. D. O. Finlay of 41 & 54 Squadrons, Passed away.

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