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No.75 Sqn RAF

Founded : 1st October 1916
Country : UK
Fate : Disbanded 15th October 1945
Known Aircraft Codes : AA, FO, JN

New Zealand

Ake ake kia kaha - For ever and ever be strong

No.75 Sqn RAF


Latest Battle of Britain Artwork Releases !
 Shortly after mid day on 26th August 1940, a Bolton-Paul Defiant of 264 Sqn claimed a victory that was to make history many decades later.  Dornier Do.17Z2, Wk No 1160 of 7/III KG.3 had been part of a raiding force sent to attack targets in Essex.  Attacked from below, the Do.17 suffered terminal damage and came to rest in the shallow waters of the Goodwin Sands, near Deal in Kent.  Two of her crew died in the incident, but two others survived and became prisoners of war.  In June 2013, over seventy years later, 5K+AR was raised from the water to be put on display at the RAF Museum in Hendon, becoming the only example of its type to survive anywhere in the world.

5K+AR Sole Survivor by Ivan Berryman.
 Spitfires of No.616 Squadron, September 1940.  The aircraft nearest is K4330 QJ-G, the mount of Johnnie Johnson.

The New Knights by David Pentland. (P)
 Hurricanes of No.605 Squadron, October 1940.  Aircraft pictured are P3308 UP-A of A A McKellar and N2471 of P Parrott.

Enemy Approaching by David Pentland. (P)
 On 14th June 1940, the first German jackboots were heard on the streets of Paris. Within days France signed an armistice and Hitler could now turn his avaricious eyes north and across the grey waters of the Channel. The island of Britain stood alone and, faced with the threat of imminent invasion, few gave her much chance of survival. Before the all-conquering Panzers could invade, Germany needed to gain air superiority and Goering boasted that his Luftwaffe 'would quickly sweep the RAF from the skies' – how wrong he would be. The Battle of Britain began on 10th July 1940 and for the next eight weeks most front-line squadrons were often flying four missions a day. Totally outnumbered by the Luftwaffe the RAF was close to breaking point by early September, with some units reduced to a handful of pilots and aircraft. Then on 7th September, an over-confident Goering made a fatal error. Believing the RAF destroyed, he changed tactics and the Luftwaffe began bombing civilian targets in London. It was the respite that Fighter Command needed and the tide of battle was turned. Against overwhelming and seemingly impossible odds, a replenished RAF repelled the Luftwaffe and by the end of October it was over. Richard Taylor's stunning painting depicts Mk1 Spitfires from 92 Squadron undertaking a defensive sweep along the Kent coastline against a dramatic backdrop of the white cliffs of Dover, at the height of the battle in September 1940.

Channel Sweep by Richard Taylor.

Aircraft for : No.75 Sqn RAF
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by No.75 Sqn RAF. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Anson

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Manufacturer : Avro

Anson

Full profile not yet available.

Harrow

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Harrow

Full profile not yet available.

Kittyhawk



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Manufacturer : Curtiss

Kittyhawk

Curtiss Kittyhawk, single engine fighter with a top speed of 362mph, ceiling of 30,000 feet and a range of 1190 miles with extra fuel tanks but 900 miles under normal operation. Kitty Hawk armaments was four or six .50in machine guns in the wings and a bomb load of up to 1,000 lb's. A development of the earlier Tomahawk, the Kitty Hawk saw service in may air force's around the world, American, Australian, New Zealand, and the Royal Air Force. which used them in the Mediterranean, north Africa, and Malta. from January 1942/ apart from the large numbers used by the Us Air Force, over 3,000 were used by Commonwealth air force's including the Royal air Force.

Lancaster



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Manufacturer : Avro
Production Began : 1942
Retired : 1963
Number Built : 7377

Lancaster

The Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' Operation Gomorrah in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.

Lincoln

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Manufacturer : Avro

Lincoln

Full profile not yet available.

Spitfire



Click the name above to see prints featuring Spitfire aircraft.

Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Spitfire

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

Stirling



Click the name above to see prints featuring Stirling aircraft.

Manufacturer : Short
Production Began : 1939
Number Built : 2381

Stirling

The Royal Air Force's first four engined monoplane Bomber, the Short Stirling first flew in May 1939 and entered front line service in August 1940 with no. 7 squadron. Due to its poor operational ceiling the aircraft sustained heavy losses and by mid 1942 the Stirling was beginning to be replaced by the Lancaster. Improved versions of the Short Stirling were built for Glider towing, paratroopers and heavy transport. also from 1943 many of the Stirling's were used for mine laying. A total of 2381 Stirling's were built for the Royal air Force and from this total 641 Stirling bombers were lost to enemy action. Crew 7 or 8: Speed: 260 mph (MK1) 275mph (MKIII) and 280mph (MKV)Service ceiling 17,000 feet Range: 2330 miles. (MK1) 2010 miles (MKIII) and 3,000 miles (MKV) Armament: two .303 Vickers machine guns. in nose turret, two .303 in browning machine guns in dorsal turret , Four .303 Browning machine guns in tail turret. Bomb Load 14,000 Lbs Engines: four 1150 Hp Bristol Hercules II (MK1) four 1650 hp Bristol Hercules XVI (MK111 and MKV)

Wellington



Click the name above to see prints featuring Wellington aircraft.

Manufacturer : Vickers
Production Began : 1938
Retired : 1953

Wellington

The Vickers Wellington was a Bomber aircraft and also used for maritime reconnaissance. and had a normal crew of six except in the MKV and VI where a crew of three was used. Maximum speed was 235 mph (MK1c) 255 mph (MK III, X) and 299 mph (MK IIII), normal operating range of 1805 miles (except MK III which was 1470miles) The Wellington or Wimpy as it was known, was the major bomber of the Royal Air Force between 1939 and 1943. The Royal Air Force received its first Wellingtons in October 1938 to 99 squadron. and by the outbreak of World war two there were 6 squadrons equipped with the Vickers Wellington. Due to heavy losses on daylight raids, the Wellington became a night bomber and from 1940 was also used as a long range bomber in North Africa. and in 1942 also became a long range bomber for the royal Air Force in India. It was well used by Coastal Command as a U-Boat Hunter. The Wellington remained in service with the Royal Air Force until 1953. Probably due to its versatile use, The aircraft was also used for experimental work including the fitting of a pressure cabin for High altitude tests. The Vickers Wellington could sustain major damage and still fly, probably due to its construction of its geodesic structure and practical application of geodesic lines. Designed by Sir Barnes Wallis
Signatures for : No.75 Sqn RAF
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Wing Commander Robert Bray
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Wing Commander Robert Bray

Robert flew his first tour of 32 ops in 75 (NZ) Squadron on Wellington’s. After a period instructing he joined 105 Squadron PFF on Mosquitos, flying Oboe operations, completing 87 ops by June 1944. In March 1945 he was posted to command 571 Squadron PFF, then commanded 128 Squadron PFF until Feb 1946.



Warrant Officer Ron Brown
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Warrant Officer Ron Brown

Initially served as a Fitter on Hurricanes and Harvards, then joined Aircrew in 1942 and served as a Flight Engineer on Stirlings with 218 Squadron where he towed gliders on D-Day. He went on to complete another Tour with 75 Squadron on Lancasters, completing 64 Operations by the end of the War.



Flight Lieutenant Raife J Cowan
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Raife J Cowan
Flight Lieutenant Raife J Cowan

Joined the RAAF in May 1940 and attended EFTS in Australia and gained his wings in Canada. Early in 1941, Raife sailed to the UK and converted to Spitfires at 57 OTU Hawarden. In April 1942 he joined 452 Sqn RAAF being formed at Kirton in Lindsay, Lincolnshire. On 16th June 1941 he was hospitalised after a night flying prang until re-joining the squadron at Kenley during September. Raife flew operations with 452 Sqn until the squadron was posted to Australia for the defence of Darwin. On 24th June he joined 75 Sqn which was re-forming at Kingaroy after their epic forty four day Battle at Port Moresby. Cowan flew to New Guinea in July and participated in the Battle of Milne Bay during August and September, then withdrew to Australia with the squadron. In February 1943 Raife was posted to 2 OTU Mildura as an instructor on Spitfires, Kittyhawks and Wirraways. On 3rd August 1945 Raife Cowan was posted as CO to 78 Sqn at Tarakan until the end of the war.




Squadron Leader T Kearns
Click the name above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader T Kearns
Squadron Leader T Kearns

New Zealander Terry Kearns joined the RNZAF in December 1940, transferring to England in 1941 to join 75 (NZ) Squadron, flying Wellingtons. In 1942 he took part in the first 1000 bomber raids before joining 156 Squadron Pathfinders. After a period as an instructor, he joined 617 Squadron at Warboys on operations. He flew the Mosquito FBVI on precision low-level target marking throughout 1944. He took part in most of 617's major operations, including raids on the Samur rail tunnel, and the V1 rocket sites.



Flt Lt Len MacNamara DFC
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flt Lt Len MacNamara DFC
Flt Lt Len MacNamara DFC

A Rear Gunner with 10 Squadron at Melbourne, before being transferred to 158 Squadron at Lissett. He completed 36 Operations, then after a spell at OTU, completed 10 more Operations with 75 New Zealand Squadron.




Group Captain Roy D Max
Click the name above to see prints signed by Group Captain Roy D Max

1 / 7 / 2007Died : 1 / 7 / 2007
Group Captain Roy D Max

Group Captain Roy Max, who has died aged 88, Roy Max was born on November 24 1918 at Brightwater, near Nelson in New Zealand. After attending Nelson College he learned to fly at the local aero club when he was 18. travelled from New Zealand to join the RAF and received a short servcie commission in August 1938 as a pilot and survived the crippling losses of bombers deployed to France at the outbreak of the Second World War; already a veteran at 24, he was made a wing commander and appointed to command No 75 (NZ) Squadron, the first Commonwealth squadron in Bomber Command. Shortly after the declaration of war in September 1939 No 103 Squadron, equipped with the Fairey Battle, deployed to France. in May 1940 along with the other 9 Fairy Battle squadorns. took part in action against the german Offensive But the Fairy battles were outclassed by the german fighters. On one occassion a force of 70 fairey Battle aircraft took part in a bombingmission on bridges at sedan a total of 41 aircraft were lost., Captain Roy Max dived on a group of enemy tanks in a valley and found that the guns were shooting down on him. His aircraft was hit and unable to climb. Although he and his gunner were wounded, he managed to land on a French airfield. Returning to operations a few days later, he was told that he had been awarded the Croix de Guerre and the news reached his parents and newspapers in New Zealand. In the chaos of the collapsing French administration, however, the paperwork was lost and he never received the medal. By the middle of June No 103 had lost 18 aircraft and nine crews, and Max was lucky to survive when a German fighter strafed the airfield as he was standing on the wing refuelling his aircraft. He jumped into a trench and watched his bomber burst into flames with all his belongings inside it. In the sole surviving aircraft he took off for a maintenance unit near Nantes, where a number of other Battles were found. Ground crew were loaded into the cramped cockpit of Max's aircraft and he headed towards England. He navigated using a map torn from a calendar, skirting the Channel Islands and landing at the first airfield he came to after crossing the English coast in order to determine where he was; he then pressed on to Abingdon. Roy Max his squadorn but now 103 squadron was now equipped with Wellington bombers, and Max flew on the squadron's first operation bombing the docks at Ostend in December 1940. Roy Max also attacked targets in the Ruhr. in March 1941 Roy Max spent some time ferrying Amercina built Hudson bombers form the Us to England, after this he re joined 103 squadron. On July 24th 1941 a 100 boomber day light raid took place against the german naval ships at Brest, Roy Max was leading a section of Wellingtons with no fighter escort, and losses were heavy. But he pressed home his attack, and his bombs were seen exploding on a dry dock. He was awarded the DFC. In July 1943 Max's short service commission was completed, and he reverted to the RNZAF as a squadron leader. Almost immediately he was informed that it had been decided that a native New Zealander should command No 75 (NZ) Squadron and he was promoted to wing commander. Max began operations on August 19 1943, flying the Stirling bomber from an airfield near Cambridge. The Battle of Berlin was under way and the Stirling, unable to climb to the higher levels of the Lancaster and Halifax, suffered heavy losses. Roy Max as the squadorn Commnader flew operations with his crew but, was not expected to fly on every sortie. The Stirling was eventually withdrawn from long-range bombing operations, and Max and his crews flew mining sorties and parachute drops to resistance groups. After converting to the Lancaster and flying a few more operations in support of the impending D-Day landings, his tour ended in May 1944, when he was awarded the DSO, an award that he always claimed belonged to his air and ground crews. Max returned to New Zealand to command a flying training airfield near Christchurch. In 1947 he accepted a permanent commission in the RAF, returning to England as a flight lieutenant. Having attended a course at the RAF Flying College he commanded the bomber squadron at the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment at Boscombe Down, where the new jet bombers for the RAF were being tested. After commands in Germany and Italy and other Air ministry Jobs, in 1965 he became ADC to the Queen and finally retiring form the RAF in November 1968. Sadly on the 1st July 2007 Roy Max passed away.



Warrant Officer Lou Parsons
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Warrant Officer Lou Parsons

Flight Engineer, 75 Squadron.




Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener DSO DFC (deceased)
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener DSO DFC (deceased)

5 / 2007Died : 5 / 2007
Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener DSO DFC (deceased)

One of the top RAF navigators of the war who went on more than 100 sorties in Bomber Command. Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener was born in Birmingham in November 1915 and joined the Royal Air Force in early 1939. Norman Scrivener trained at Staverton Aerodrome, in Gloucestershire, where he discovered he suffered from air sickness. He joined 97 (New Zealand ) Squadron, became a pilot officer and was one of the first navigators to use the developing radar systems and later flew with Wing Commander Guy Gibson (before Gibson moved to the Dambusters.) with 106 Squadron and in 1943 joined the Pathfinders of 83 Squadron as navigator to the Squadron Commander John Searby and took part in the raid on the German radar facilities in Peenemunde where the German V2 and V1 rockets were produced and tested. Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Distinguished Flying Order. Sadly Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener died in Worcester aged 91 in May 2007.



Flight Lieutenant Noel C Todd
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Noel C Todd
Flight Lieutenant Noel C Todd

Joined the RAAF in November 1940. Noel trained in Australia and gained his wings in Canada. Commissioned as Pilot Officer, he sailed to the UK in 1941 and attended a Spitfire OTU then posted to 501 Sqn equipped with Spitfire Vs. Noel was seconded to Australia and joined 75 Sqn in June 1942. Flying Kittyhawks he took part in the Battle of Milne Bay during August / September 1942. After returning to Australia to rest and re-equip, Todd returned to Milne Bay with the squadronin February 1943. In April, Flg Off Todd flew A29-133 during a patrol from Milne Bay and on 14th April claimed a Zero destroyed during 75 Sqns last major air to air battle of the war when one hundred Japanese planes attacked Milne Bay. He remained with the squadron for much of 1943 and was then posted as a Test Pilot to the Aircraft Performance Unit at Laverton. Noel Todd ended his service career testing aircraft at 2 OTU.



Flt Lt B S Turner DFC
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flt Lt B S Turner DFC
Flt Lt B S Turner DFC

Volunteered for the RAF in 1940 and trained as a Heavy Bomber pilot flying Tiger Moths, Airspeed Oxfords and Wellingtons at Hatfield, South Cerney and Pershore respectively. His first operational posting was to a grass field aerodrome at Feltwell where he flew Wellingtons with 75 NZ Sqn. After a tour of 37 trips mainly over Germany he then spent two and a half years as taxi driver with various navigation training flights and some two years later was posted to 61 Sqn at Skellingforth for a second tour of ops flying Lancasters - flying N for Nan on her 100th trip. After 21 ops he went to T.R.E. Defford as an experimental pilot. At that time the Air Force was preparing Tiger Force for the invasion of Japan, but because of the atomic bomb being dropped the invasion did not take place. Flying at Defford was with radar boffins testing their various offensive and defensive radar equipment in about ten different types of aircraft. In 1946 Fly Lt Turner left the Air Force.


Battle of Britain History Timeline : 2nd September
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
2September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O A. T. Rose-Price of 501 Squadron, was Killed.
2September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O O. St. J. Pigg of 72 Squadron, was Killed.
2September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O C. A. DFC Woods-Scawen of 43 Squadron, was Killed.
2September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. C. L. D. Bailey of 46 Squadron, was Killed.
2September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. W. L. DFM Dymond of 111 Squadron, was Killed.
2September1940Feldwebel Erwin Leykauf of JG 54 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Feldwebel Heinz Bär of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Feldwebel Herbert Schramm of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Feldwebel Rudolf Täschner of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Feldwebel Werner Stumpf of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Fuhrer Hans-Joachim Marseille of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Hauptmann Wilhelm Knapp of 3. (F)/Aufklärungs-Gruppe 123 was awarded the Knight's Cross
2September1940Hauptmann Wolfgang Lippert of JG 53 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Leutnant Eberhard Bock of JG 3 shot down a Morane
2September1940Leutnant Erich Meyer of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Leutnant Ernst Terry of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Leutnant Franz Essl of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Leutnant Friedrich-Wilhelm Behrens of JG 54 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Leutnant Gerhard Sprenger of JG 3 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Leutnant Günther Büsgen of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Leutnant Karl Götze of LG 1 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Number of aircraft available for service on this day was 690 with 398 Hurricanes, 204 Spitfires, 60 Blenheims, amd 21 Defiants and 7 Gladiators
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Erich Kuhlmann of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Erich Rudorffer of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Georg Schott of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Heinrich Osswald of JG 3 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Hermann Staege of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Max Bucholz of JG 3 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Oskar Strack of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Siegfried Schnell of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Werner Machold of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Werner Machold of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Werner Machold of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Obergefreiter Karl-Heinz Boock of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Adolf Buhl of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Friedrich von Schlosheim of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Günther Scholz of JG 54 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Helmut Bennemann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Herbert Ihlefeld of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Herbert Ihlefeld of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Herbert Kunze of JG 77 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Hortari Schmude of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Hortari Schmude of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Kurt Kirchner of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Otto Bertram of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Otto Bertram of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Richard Hausmann of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Oberleutnant Wilhelm Herget of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Wilhelm Hobein of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Wolfgang Ewald of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Royal Air Force lost 20 aircraft with 10 pilots killed or missing.
2September1940Spitfire K9799 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Spitfire K9840 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Spitfire K9938 Mk.Ia , SD-H, ZP-W, - Shot down by Me109. Crashed near Herne Bay. Sergeant Norfolk parachuted to safety.
2September1940Spitfire N3056 Mk.Ia , XT-B, - Shot down by Me109 near Maidstone. Sergeant Stokoe parachuted to safety but was injured.
2September1940Spitfire P9458 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 over Kent. Pilot Officer O st J Pigg killed.
2September1940Spitfire R6752 Mk.Ia - Wheels up landing at Hornchurch following combat. Pilot Officer Haig ok.
2September1940Spitfire R6769 Mk.Ia - Damaged in night landing accident.
2September1940Spitfire R6806 Mk.Ia , DW-N, - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Spitfire X4105 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Spitfire X4181 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me110 near Gravesend. Flight Lieutenant Gillam parachuted to safety.
2September1940Spitfire X4241 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Spitfire X4262 Mk.Ia - Damaged by Me109 and abandoned near Marden.
2September1940Spitfire X4280 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Unteroffizier Hommel of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Arno Zimmermann of JG 54 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Erwin Fleig of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Fritz Auerbach of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Georg Mund of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Unteroffizier Johann Horst of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Kurt Koch of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Unteroffizier Otto Riedel of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Rudolf Eiberg of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Rudolf Meixner of JG 77 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940the Luftwaffe lost 19 ME109, 5 ME110 , 2 HE111, 5 DO17 and 3 DO215, Flak also shot down 1 ME109 and 3 DO17, with a further probabaly 8
Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 2nd September
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS

 

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