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No.75 Sqn RAF

Founded : 1st October 1916
Country : UK
Fate : Disbanded 15th October 1945
Known Aircraft Codes : AA, FO, JN

New Zealand

Ake ake kia kaha - For ever and ever be strong

No.75 Sqn RAF


Latest Battle of Britain Artwork Releases !
 They came from every corner of Britain.  And mostly they were young.  These fresh faced fighter pilots, joined by an ever-growing band of volunteer airmen from the British Commonwealth and those who had managed to escape from the occupied countries of Europe would, over the summer of 1940, not only hold the world's most powerful air force at bay, they would defeat it.  Richard Taylor's stunning piece graphically conveys the conflicting realities of those deadly aerial encounters over southern England during 1940.  As the sound of Merlin engines briefly interrupts the tranquility of a sleepy English village, its residents are determined to carry on with everyday life.  In the skies overhead the bitter battle will shortly be reaching its crescendo but, for today at least, the fighting is over as Flight Sergeant George 'Grumpy' Unwin, one of the Battle of Britain's top Aces, and the Spitfire pilots of 19 Squadron return from yet another encounter with Goering's much-vaunted Luftwaffe.

Return From the Fray by Richard Taylor.
 A trio of Spitfire Mk1s of 603 Sqn based at Biggin Hill are depicted on patrol in the Summer skies above Kent during the height of the Battle of Britain in August 1940. Lead aircraft is N3288 XT-H flown by Plt Off George Gilroy who finished the war with 14 confirmed victories, 10 shared and a further 14 aircraft destroyed in actions in which he was directly involved.

Biggin Trio by Ivan Berryman.
 Spitfires of 616 Squadron scramble from RAF Kenley during the heavy fighting of the Battle of Britain, late August 1940.  Below them a Hurricane of 253 Squadron, sharing the same base, is being prepared for its next vital mission at a distant dispersal.  All through the long summer of 1940, as Britain stood alone, a small band of fighter pilots took part in the greatest aerial battle in history.  Day after day the men of Fighter Command valiantly took to the air to defend their country from the Luftwaffe and the threat of German invasion and Nazi tyranny.  Outnumbered, but never out-fought, they fought to the point of exhaustion and, in doing so, paid a heavy price.  But they won.

We All Stand Together by Robert Taylor.
 You can almost hear the roar of their mighty Merlin engines and feel the prop-wash in this salute to the Hawker Hurricane.  This classic portrayal of this much-loved fighter depicts a pair of Mk.I Hurricanes from No.32 Sqn leading the scramble away from their forward airfield.  Often making three, four or five such scrambles a day at the height of the battle, this time they are racing to intercept Luftwaffe intruders who have been spotted crossing the Kent coast.

Response to Call by Robert Taylor.

Aircraft for : No.75 Sqn RAF
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by No.75 Sqn RAF. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Anson

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Manufacturer : Avro

Anson

Full profile not yet available.

Harrow

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Harrow

Full profile not yet available.

Kittyhawk



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Manufacturer : Curtiss

Kittyhawk

Curtiss Kittyhawk, single engine fighter with a top speed of 362mph, ceiling of 30,000 feet and a range of 1190 miles with extra fuel tanks but 900 miles under normal operation. Kitty Hawk armaments was four or six .50in machine guns in the wings and a bomb load of up to 1,000 lb's. A development of the earlier Tomahawk, the Kitty Hawk saw service in may air force's around the world, American, Australian, New Zealand, and the Royal Air Force. which used them in the Mediterranean, north Africa, and Malta. from January 1942/ apart from the large numbers used by the Us Air Force, over 3,000 were used by Commonwealth air force's including the Royal air Force.

Lancaster



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Manufacturer : Avro
Production Began : 1942
Retired : 1963
Number Built : 7377

Lancaster

The Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' Operation Gomorrah in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.

Lincoln

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Manufacturer : Avro

Lincoln

Full profile not yet available.

Spitfire



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Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Spitfire

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

Stirling



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Manufacturer : Short
Production Began : 1939
Number Built : 2381

Stirling

The Royal Air Force's first four engined monoplane Bomber, the Short Stirling first flew in May 1939 and entered front line service in August 1940 with no. 7 squadron. Due to its poor operational ceiling the aircraft sustained heavy losses and by mid 1942 the Stirling was beginning to be replaced by the Lancaster. Improved versions of the Short Stirling were built for Glider towing, paratroopers and heavy transport. also from 1943 many of the Stirling's were used for mine laying. A total of 2381 Stirling's were built for the Royal air Force and from this total 641 Stirling bombers were lost to enemy action. Crew 7 or 8: Speed: 260 mph (MK1) 275mph (MKIII) and 280mph (MKV)Service ceiling 17,000 feet Range: 2330 miles. (MK1) 2010 miles (MKIII) and 3,000 miles (MKV) Armament: two .303 Vickers machine guns. in nose turret, two .303 in browning machine guns in dorsal turret , Four .303 Browning machine guns in tail turret. Bomb Load 14,000 Lbs Engines: four 1150 Hp Bristol Hercules II (MK1) four 1650 hp Bristol Hercules XVI (MK111 and MKV)

Wellington



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Manufacturer : Vickers
Production Began : 1938
Retired : 1953

Wellington

The Vickers Wellington was a Bomber aircraft and also used for maritime reconnaissance. and had a normal crew of six except in the MKV and VI where a crew of three was used. Maximum speed was 235 mph (MK1c) 255 mph (MK III, X) and 299 mph (MK IIII), normal operating range of 1805 miles (except MK III which was 1470miles) The Wellington or Wimpy as it was known, was the major bomber of the Royal Air Force between 1939 and 1943. The Royal Air Force received its first Wellingtons in October 1938 to 99 squadron. and by the outbreak of World war two there were 6 squadrons equipped with the Vickers Wellington. Due to heavy losses on daylight raids, the Wellington became a night bomber and from 1940 was also used as a long range bomber in North Africa. and in 1942 also became a long range bomber for the royal Air Force in India. It was well used by Coastal Command as a U-Boat Hunter. The Wellington remained in service with the Royal Air Force until 1953. Probably due to its versatile use, The aircraft was also used for experimental work including the fitting of a pressure cabin for High altitude tests. The Vickers Wellington could sustain major damage and still fly, probably due to its construction of its geodesic structure and practical application of geodesic lines. Designed by Sir Barnes Wallis
Signatures for : No.75 Sqn RAF
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Warrant Officer Dennis Baker
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Warrant Officer Dennis Baker

Originally a Halton Brat, Dennis qualified as a Flight Engineer serving with 75 Sqn on Stirlings. Shot down on his third operation returning from Frankfurt on 3rd December 1942, he was held as a PoW for nearly three years in camps including Stalag Luft I, Lutz VI and 357.



Wing Commander Robert Bray
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Wing Commander Robert Bray

Robert flew his first tour of 32 ops in 75 (NZ) Squadron on Wellington’s. After a period instructing he joined 105 Squadron PFF on Mosquitos, flying Oboe operations, completing 87 ops by June 1944. In March 1945 he was posted to command 571 Squadron PFF, then commanded 128 Squadron PFF until Feb 1946.



Warrant Officer Ron Brown
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Warrant Officer Ron Brown

Initially served as a Fitter on Hurricanes and Harvards, then joined Aircrew in 1942 and served as a Flight Engineer on Stirlings with 218 Squadron where he towed gliders on D-Day. He went on to complete another Tour with 75 Squadron on Lancasters, completing 64 Operations by the end of the War.



Flight Lieutenant Raife J Cowan
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Flight Lieutenant Raife J Cowan

Joined the RAAF in May 1940 and attended EFTS in Australia and gained his wings in Canada. Early in 1941, Raife sailed to the UK and converted to Spitfires at 57 OTU Hawarden. In April 1942 he joined 452 Sqn RAAF being formed at Kirton in Lindsay, Lincolnshire. On 16th June 1941 he was hospitalised after a night flying prang until re-joining the squadron at Kenley during September. Raife flew operations with 452 Sqn until the squadron was posted to Australia for the defence of Darwin. On 24th June he joined 75 Sqn which was re-forming at Kingaroy after their epic forty four day Battle at Port Moresby. Cowan flew to New Guinea in July and participated in the Battle of Milne Bay during August and September, then withdrew to Australia with the squadron. In February 1943 Raife was posted to 2 OTU Mildura as an instructor on Spitfires, Kittyhawks and Wirraways. On 3rd August 1945 Raife Cowan was posted as CO to 78 Sqn at Tarakan until the end of the war.




Squadron Leader T Kearns
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Squadron Leader T Kearns

New Zealander Terry Kearns joined the RNZAF in December 1940, transferring to England in 1941 to join 75 (NZ) Squadron, flying Wellingtons. In 1942 he took part in the first 1000 bomber raids before joining 156 Squadron Pathfinders. After a period as an instructor, he joined 617 Squadron at Warboys on operations. He flew the Mosquito FBVI on precision low-level target marking throughout 1944. He took part in most of 617s major operations, including raids on the Samur rail tunnel, and the V1 rocket sites.



Flt Lt Len MacNamara DFC
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Flt Lt Len MacNamara DFC

A Rear Gunner with 10 Squadron at Melbourne, before being transferred to 158 Squadron at Lissett. He completed 36 Operations, then after a spell at OTU, completed 10 more Operations with 75 New Zealand Squadron.




Group Captain Roy D Max
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1 / 7 / 2007Died : 1 / 7 / 2007
Group Captain Roy D Max

Group Captain Roy Max, who has died aged 88, Roy Max was born on November 24 1918 at Brightwater, near Nelson in New Zealand. After attending Nelson College he learned to fly at the local aero club when he was 18. travelled from New Zealand to join the RAF and received a short servcie commission in August 1938 as a pilot and survived the crippling losses of bombers deployed to France at the outbreak of the Second World War; already a veteran at 24, he was made a wing commander and appointed to command No 75 (NZ) Squadron, the first Commonwealth squadron in Bomber Command. Shortly after the declaration of war in September 1939 No 103 Squadron, equipped with the Fairey Battle, deployed to France. in May 1940 along with the other 9 Fairy Battle squadorns. took part in action against the german Offensive But the Fairy battles were outclassed by the german fighters. On one occassion a force of 70 fairey Battle aircraft took part in a bombingmission on bridges at sedan a total of 41 aircraft were lost., Captain Roy Max dived on a group of enemy tanks in a valley and found that the guns were shooting down on him. His aircraft was hit and unable to climb. Although he and his gunner were wounded, he managed to land on a French airfield. Returning to operations a few days later, he was told that he had been awarded the Croix de Guerre and the news reached his parents and newspapers in New Zealand. In the chaos of the collapsing French administration, however, the paperwork was lost and he never received the medal. By the middle of June No 103 had lost 18 aircraft and nine crews, and Max was lucky to survive when a German fighter strafed the airfield as he was standing on the wing refuelling his aircraft. He jumped into a trench and watched his bomber burst into flames with all his belongings inside it. In the sole surviving aircraft he took off for a maintenance unit near Nantes, where a number of other Battles were found. Ground crew were loaded into the cramped cockpit of Max's aircraft and he headed towards England. He navigated using a map torn from a calendar, skirting the Channel Islands and landing at the first airfield he came to after crossing the English coast in order to determine where he was; he then pressed on to Abingdon. Roy Max his squadorn but now 103 squadron was now equipped with Wellington bombers, and Max flew on the squadron's first operation bombing the docks at Ostend in December 1940. Roy Max also attacked targets in the Ruhr. in March 1941 Roy Max spent some time ferrying Amercina built Hudson bombers form the Us to England, after this he re joined 103 squadron. On July 24th 1941 a 100 boomber day light raid took place against the german naval ships at Brest, Roy Max was leading a section of Wellingtons with no fighter escort, and losses were heavy. But he pressed home his attack, and his bombs were seen exploding on a dry dock. He was awarded the DFC. In July 1943 Max's short service commission was completed, and he reverted to the RNZAF as a squadron leader. Almost immediately he was informed that it had been decided that a native New Zealander should command No 75 (NZ) Squadron and he was promoted to wing commander. Max began operations on August 19 1943, flying the Stirling bomber from an airfield near Cambridge. The Battle of Berlin was under way and the Stirling, unable to climb to the higher levels of the Lancaster and Halifax, suffered heavy losses. Roy Max as the squadorn Commnader flew operations with his crew but, was not expected to fly on every sortie. The Stirling was eventually withdrawn from long-range bombing operations, and Max and his crews flew mining sorties and parachute drops to resistance groups. After converting to the Lancaster and flying a few more operations in support of the impending D-Day landings, his tour ended in May 1944, when he was awarded the DSO, an award that he always claimed belonged to his air and ground crews. Max returned to New Zealand to command a flying training airfield near Christchurch. In 1947 he accepted a permanent commission in the RAF, returning to England as a flight lieutenant. Having attended a course at the RAF Flying College he commanded the bomber squadron at the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment at Boscombe Down, where the new jet bombers for the RAF were being tested. After commands in Germany and Italy and other Air ministry Jobs, in 1965 he became ADC to the Queen and finally retiring form the RAF in November 1968. Sadly on the 1st July 2007 Roy Max passed away.



Warrant Officer Lou Parsons
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Warrant Officer Lou Parsons

Flight Engineer, 75 Squadron.




Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener DSO DFC (deceased)
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener DSO DFC (deceased)

5 / 2007Died : 5 / 2007
Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener DSO DFC (deceased)

One of the top RAF navigators of the war who went on more than 100 sorties in Bomber Command. Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener was born in Birmingham in November 1915 and joined the Royal Air Force in early 1939. Norman Scrivener trained at Staverton Aerodrome, in Gloucestershire, where he discovered he suffered from air sickness. He joined 97 (New Zealand ) Squadron, became a pilot officer and was one of the first navigators to use the developing radar systems and later flew with Wing Commander Guy Gibson (before Gibson moved to the Dambusters.) with 106 Squadron and in 1943 joined the Pathfinders of 83 Squadron as navigator to the Squadron Commander John Searby and took part in the raid on the German radar facilities in Peenemunde where the German V2 and V1 rockets were produced and tested. Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Distinguished Flying Order. Sadly Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener died in Worcester aged 91 in May 2007.



Flight Lieutenant Noel C Todd
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Noel C Todd
Flight Lieutenant Noel C Todd

Joined the RAAF in November 1940. Noel trained in Australia and gained his wings in Canada. Commissioned as Pilot Officer, he sailed to the UK in 1941 and attended a Spitfire OTU then posted to 501 Sqn equipped with Spitfire Vs. Noel was seconded to Australia and joined 75 Sqn in June 1942. Flying Kittyhawks he took part in the Battle of Milne Bay during August / September 1942. After returning to Australia to rest and re-equip, Todd returned to Milne Bay with the squadronin February 1943. In April, Flg Off Todd flew A29-133 during a patrol from Milne Bay and on 14th April claimed a Zero destroyed during 75 Sqns last major air to air battle of the war when one hundred Japanese planes attacked Milne Bay. He remained with the squadron for much of 1943 and was then posted as a Test Pilot to the Aircraft Performance Unit at Laverton. Noel Todd ended his service career testing aircraft at 2 OTU.



Flt Lt B S Turner DFC
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flt Lt B S Turner DFC
Flt Lt B S Turner DFC

Volunteered for the RAF in 1940 and trained as a Heavy Bomber pilot flying Tiger Moths, Airspeed Oxfords and Wellingtons at Hatfield, South Cerney and Pershore respectively. His first operational posting was to a grass field aerodrome at Feltwell where he flew Wellingtons with 75 NZ Sqn. After a tour of 37 trips mainly over Germany he then spent two and a half years as taxi driver with various navigation training flights and some two years later was posted to 61 Sqn at Skellingforth for a second tour of ops flying Lancasters - flying N for Nan on her 100th trip. After 21 ops he went to T.R.E. Defford as an experimental pilot. At that time the Air Force was preparing Tiger Force for the invasion of Japan, but because of the atomic bomb being dropped the invasion did not take place. Flying at Defford was with radar boffins testing their various offensive and defensive radar equipment in about ten different types of aircraft. In 1946 Fly Lt Turner left the Air Force.


Battle of Britain History Timeline : 31st August
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
31August1940Anti Aircraft batteries shot down 15 Luftwaffe aircrfat, sveen ME109's one ME110 and seven DO17's
31August1940At 1315 hours Croydon Aerodrome was bombed and the Rollason Aircraft Works were destroyed. Other buildings were damaged including the Redwing Aircraft Factory
31August1940Biggin Hill Aerodrome was twice bombed at 1200 hours and again at 1838 hours Aerodrome, buildings were wrecked, gas and water mains affected and aircraft damaged
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O E. J. Wilcox of 72 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O P. S. DFC Weaver of 56 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O R. McG. Waterston of 603 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O G. H. Maffett of 257 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O M. D. W. A. Doulton of 601 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O R. A. C. Aeberhardt of 19 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. H. M. Starr of 245 & 253 Squadrons, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. H. A. Bolton of 79 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. I. Johnson of 222 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940Czech Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. Stirbacek of 310 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940Feldwebel Franz Lüders of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Feldwebel Fritz Dettmer of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Feldwebel Fritz Stritzel of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Feldwebel Konrad Jäckel of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Feldwebel Leonhard Kaufmann of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Feldwebel Siegfried Voss of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Flight Lieutenant Kenneth McLeod Gillies of No.66 Sqn RAF shot down a Do215
31August1940Gefreiter Erwin Richey of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hauptmann Rolf Pingel of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hauptmann Wolf-Dietrich Wilcke of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hornchurch Aerodrome, was attacked twice at 1300 hours and 1800 hours. six aircraft on the gorund were destroyed and four damaged
31August1940It is calculates that 300 German aircraft attacked Great Britain during the night 30th/31st August and 800 during the day of 31st August.
31August1940Leutnant Erich Schmidt of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Gottfried Schlitzer of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Gustav Sprick of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Gustav Sprick of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Hans Berthel of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Hans Berthel of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Hans Christinnecke of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Hans-Ekkehard Bob of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Hans-Ekkehard Bob of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Heinz Ebeling of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Heinz Ebeling of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Heinz Ebeling of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Heinz Schnabel of JG 3 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Hubert Mütherich of JG 77 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Joachim Junghans of ZG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Klaus Mietusch of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Kurt Sidow of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Kurt Votel of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Kurt Votel of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Kurt Votel of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Wolfgang Kosse of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Major Adolf Galland of JG 26 shot down a Curtiss
31August1940Major Adolf Galland of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Major Adolf Galland of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Major Werner Mölders of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Major Werner Mölders of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Major Werner Mölders of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Major Wolfgang Schellmann of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940No 151 Squadron has moved from Rochford to Duxford.
31August1940No 17 Squadron has moved from Tangmere to Debden
31August1940No 310 Squadron has moved from Duxford to North Weald.
31August1940No 601 Squadron has moved from Debden to Tangmere
31August1940No 610 Squadron has moved from Biggin Hill to Acklington
31August1940No 72 Squadron has moved from Acklington to Biggin Hill
31August1940Number of aircraft available for service on this day was 700 with 417 Hurricanes, 212 Spitfires, 54 Blenheims, amd 13 Defiants and 4 Gladiators
31August1940Oberfahnrich Alfred Wehmeyer of ZG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Adolf Iburg of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Erich Rudorffer of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Franz Willinger of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Fritz Ströhlein of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Fritz Ströhlein of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Fritz Ströhlein of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Heinrich Hott of ZG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Hermann Staege of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Karl Hier of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Otto Schulz of JG 27 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Robert Schiffbauer of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Werner Machold of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Willi Grosse of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Adolf Buhl of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Arnold Lignitz of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Eberhard Henrici of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Ernst Matthes of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Ernst-Hartmann von Schlotheim of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Franz Hahn of JG 77 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Georg Claus of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Gerhard Schöpfel of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans Barschel of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans Barschel of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans Hahn of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans Hahn of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans Hahn of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans-Joachim Jabs of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Helmut Bennemann of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Helmut Kühle of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Herbert Ihlefeld of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hermann Weeber of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hermann-Friedrich Joppien of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hermann-Friedrich Joppien of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hubert Grisslich of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Joachim Müncheberg of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Gottfried Nordmann of JG 77 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Gottfried Nordmann of JG 77 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Krahl of JG 2 shot down a Curtiss
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Krahl of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Leesmann of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Leesmann of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Leesmann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Lothar Keller of JG 3 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Richard Leppla of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Robert Göbel of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Sophus Baagoe of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Walter Horten of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Walter Schneider of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Werner Streib of NJG 1 shot down a Hampden
31August1940Oberleutnant Wilhelm Herget of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940RAF flew 192 patrols involving 1016 fighter flights
31August1940RAF lost 37 fighters t with 12 pilots killed
31August1940Spitfire N3110 Mk.Ia - Destroyed by bombs during take off. Pilot ok.
31August1940Spitfire N3233 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 and crash landed at Eastchurch. Flight Lieutenant Robinson injured.
31August1940Spitfire N3249 Mk.Ia , GR-P, - Damaged on operations and crash landed at Bilbury.
31August1940Spitfire P9323 Mk.Ia , ZD-F, - Shot down by Me109s at Isle of Sheppey. Sergeant Speares parachuted to safety.
31August1940Spitfire P9337 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 at Ashford. Pilot Officer Davies injured.
31August1940Spitfire P9360 Mk.Ia - Destroyed during air raid on Hornchurch.
31August1940Spitfire P9424 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
31August1940Spitfire P9438 Mk.Ia - Damaged by Me109 near Dungeness and crashed near New Romney. Flight Lieutenant Smith parachuted to safety.
31August1940Spitfire P9457 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 near Dungeness. Flying Officer E J Wilcox killed.
31August1940Spitfire P9497 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
31August1940Spitfire P9505 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
31August1940Spitfire R6628 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 and crashed at Bishopsbourne. Sergeant Johnson killed.
31August1940Spitfire R6629 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
31August1940Spitfire R6835 Mk.Ia , XT-W, - Damaged on operations.
31August1940Spitfire R6895 Mk.Ia - Damaged by bombs on take off.
31August1940Spitfire R6912 Mk.Ia - Damaged by Me109 and crash landed. Pilot Officer Aeberhardt killed.
31August1940Spitfire R6928 Mk.Ia - destroyed during air raid at Biggin Hill.
31August1940Spitfire R6958 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 near North Weald. Flying Officer Brinsden parachuted to safety.
31August1940Spitfire X4054 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Hurricane near Manston. Sergeant Gibbons parachuted to safety.
31August1940Spitfire X4231 Mk.Ia - Damaged by return fire from Do17s and abandoned. Flying Officer J B Coward parachuted to safety, but required leg amputation.
31August1940Spitfire X4235 Mk.Ia - Damaged on take off.
31August1940Spitfire X4236 Mk.Ia - Damaged by bombs on take off from Hornchurch.
31August1940Spitfire X4271 Mk.Ia , XT-N, - Shot down by Me109 and crashed at Wanstead. Pilot Officer Gilroy parachuted to safety.
31August1940Spitfire X4273 Mk.Ia , XT-K, - Collided with Me109 near Ilford. Flying Officer R M Waterston killed.
31August1940The RAF shot down 70- aircrfat plsu anotoher 34 unconfirmed. These were 39 ME109's ith upto 21 mE109 more, 9 ME110 and five more unconfirmed, six HE111 and 1 JU88 five DO17 plus a further twounconfirmed Ten DO215 with a further 6 unconfirmed
31August1940Unteroffizier Erwin Fleig of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Unteroffizier Franz Sander of ZG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Unteroffizier Herbert Lange of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Unteroffizier Hugo Dahmer of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Unteroffizier Hugo Dahmer of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Unteroffizier Karl Willius of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Unteroffizier Richard Heller of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 31st August
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
31August1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O R. Mottram of 92 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1943Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. B. E. Dye of 219 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1943Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. F. N. Robertson of 66 Squadron, was Killed.

 

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