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367th Fighter Group

Founded :
Country : US
Fate :

367th Fighter Group

Latest Battle of Britain Artwork Releases !
 Sunday 15 September 1940 and Luftwaffe supremo Hermann Goering believed victory over the RAF was at hand. Today, he decreed, would be the day that his 'glorious' Luftwaffe would finally break the back of Fighter Command's stubborn resistance. Or so he believed. In response to a massed formation of enemy aircraft detected heading for London, Air Vice Marshal Keith Park commanding 11 Group scrambled his squadrons. He also requested that 12 Group bring Douglas Bader's 'Big Wing' down from Duxford. Every available pilot and machine was committed. Prime Minister Winston Churchill turned to Park and asked +What other reserves have we+ +There are none+, Park replied. Bader now had five squadrons racing south, meeting what remained of the enemy on the outskirts of London. With a successful morning behind them the RAF fighters raced back to re-fuel and re-arm. Just after 14.00 hrs another enemy battle group was observed and this time the formations were even larger. Bader's Wing was scrambled once more.

The Greatest Day by Robert Taylor.
 September 1940 and they came in their hundreds, the black crosses under their wings clearly visible to those on the ground who listened in silence as the menacing drone of a thousand engines filled the clear blue summer sky.  As Goering's Luftwaffe attempted to deal the killer blow to British defences, huge formations of Heinkel, Dornier and Junker bombers lumbered over sleepy English fields towards London.  Surrounding them were their escorts, the formidable Messerschmitt Bf109 fighters.  Diving our of the sun, 11 Group's fighter squadrons pounced, with the Spitfires going for the Bf109s while the Hurricanes fell on the slower moving bombers.  Looking up on the swirling melee above, onlookers below could only watch in awe as the sky was filled with criss-cross patterns of creamy white vapour and spiralling trails of ominous, darker smoke.  A parachute here and there caught the eye as the white silk drifted slowly down to the fields below.  Hugely outnumbered, the men of RAF Fighter Command were supported by volunteer airmen from fifteen nations, and as more squadrons joined the fray the battle raged towards the capital until the Bf109s turned for home.  The Few were finally turning the tide of the Battle of Britain.

Fields of Glory by Richard Taylor.
 They came from every corner of Britain.  And mostly they were young.  These fresh faced fighter pilots, joined by an ever-growing band of volunteer airmen from the British Commonwealth and those who had managed to escape from the occupied countries of Europe would, over the summer of 1940, not only hold the world's most powerful air force at bay, they would defeat it.  Richard Taylor's stunning piece graphically conveys the conflicting realities of those deadly aerial encounters over southern England during 1940.  As the sound of Merlin engines briefly interrupts the tranquility of a sleepy English village, its residents are determined to carry on with everyday life.  In the skies overhead the bitter battle will shortly be reaching its crescendo but, for today at least, the fighting is over as Flight Sergeant George 'Grumpy' Unwin, one of the Battle of Britain's top Aces, and the Spitfire pilots of 19 Squadron return from yet another encounter with Goering's much-vaunted Luftwaffe.

Return From the Fray by Richard Taylor.
 A trio of Spitfire Mk1s of 603 Sqn based at Biggin Hill are depicted on patrol in the Summer skies above Kent during the height of the Battle of Britain in August 1940. Lead aircraft is N3288 XT-H flown by Plt Off George Gilroy who finished the war with 14 confirmed victories, 10 shared and a further 14 aircraft destroyed in actions in which he was directly involved.

Biggin Trio by Ivan Berryman.

Aces for : 367th Fighter Group
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
Laurence E Blumer6.00The signature of Laurence E Blumer features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Aircraft for : 367th Fighter Group
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by 367th Fighter Group. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.


Click the name above to see prints featuring Lightning aircraft.

Manufacturer : Lockheed


Designed by Kelly Johnson the P38 made its maiden flight on the 27th January 1939 and introduced into service in 1941. they cost $134,284 at the time each and a total of 10,037 were built. The Lockheed P-38 was introduced as a inceptor fighter but soon proved a valuable long range bomber escort for the 8thUS Air Force's B-17 and-24 bombers as they bombed targets further into Germany.
Signatures for : 367th Fighter Group
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.

Captain Larry Blumer
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Captain Larry Blumer

23 / 10 / 1997Died : 23 / 10 / 1997
23 / 10 / 1997Ace : 6.00 Victories
Captain Larry Blumer

Assigned to the 393rd Fighter Squadron, 367th Fighter Group, Scrappy, nicknamed after his Scrap Iron P-38, became one of the few fighter pilots to become an ace-in-a-day when he shot down five FW-190s in 15 minutes of aerial combat on 25 August 1944. Scrappy rose to command the 393rd and destroyed another FW-190 before returning to the States in January 1945. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, Purple Heart, Air Medal with 22 Oak Leaf Clusters and the Belgian Croix de Guerre. In 1946, he returned to the United States and became a contractor. Later in life, he purchased a P-38, painted it like his old plane, and flew it at air shows. Sadly Captain Larry Blumer died of Leukemia on October 23rd 1997 in Springfield, Oregon.

Lieutenant Colonel Joseph A Dobrowolski
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Lieutenant Colonel Joseph A Dobrowolski

1 / 2 / 2006Died : 1 / 2 / 2006
Lieutenant Colonel Joseph A Dobrowolski

Enlisting in June 1942, Joseph Dobrowolski was assigned to the 367th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force, and arrived the European Theater, April 1944, flying P-38s out of Stoney Cross in England. He flew his first combat mission a month later. Flying throughout the whole D-Day invasion period he notched up 175 combat hours, the majority in the hazardous ground-attack role, chalking up many ground victories before returning to the U.S. in November 1944. He retired Lieutenant Colonel in 1967. Joe Dobrolowolski passed away on 1st February 2006.

Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 30th November
30November1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. F. Sumner of 23 Squadron, was Killed.
30November1992Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. Mann of 64 & 92 Squadrons, Passed away.


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