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Coming Home by Tim Fisher. - battleofbritainaviationart.com


Coming Home by Tim Fisher.


Coming Home by Tim Fisher.

The B-17 Flying Fortress 'Memphis Belle' returns from one of her 25 mission over France and Germany. Memphis Belle, a B-17F-10-BO, USAAF Serial No.41-24485, was supplied to the USAAF on July 15th 1942, and delivered to the 91st Bomb Group in September 1942 at Dow Field, Bangor, Maine. Memphis Belle deployed to Scotland at Prestwick on September 30th 1942 and went to RAF Kimbolton on October 1st, and then to her permanent base at Bassingbourn on October 14th.1942. Memphis Belle was the first United States Army Air Force heavy bomber to complete 25 combat missions with her crew intact. The aircraft and crew then returned to the United States to promote and sell war bonds. The Memphis Belle B-17 is undergoing extensive restoration at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.
Item Code : DHM1283Coming Home by Tim Fisher. - This Edition
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim FisherHalf
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Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.
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Defenders of the Reich by Graeme Lothian.
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Berlin Bound by Anthony Saunders.
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American Flying Fortress Aviation Print Pack.

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Titles in this pack :
Coming Home by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)
Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)
The Veteran by Simon Smith.  (View This Item)
Last One Home by Ivan Berryman.  (View This Item)

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Other editions of this item : Coming Home by Tim Fisher DHM1283
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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim FisherHalf Price!Now : £70.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTMorgan Presentation Edition of 5 prints, supplied double mounted. Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm) Morgan, Bob (matted)
+ Artist : Tim Fisher


Signature(s) value alone : £40
£260.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
on separate certificate
£110 Off!Now : £480.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
on separate certificate
£90 Off!Now : £370.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Tim Fisher. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Tim Fisher£1900.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. (One print reduced to clear)

Ex display in near perfect coondition with minor handling dent on image.
Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim Fisher£70 Off!Now : £30.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : Coming Home by Tim Fisher.
About all editions :

Detailed Images :



The 25 missions of Memphis Belle
November 7, 1942 - Brest, France
November 9, 1942 - St Nazaire, France
November 17, 1942 - St. Nazaire, France
December 6, 1942 - Lille, France
December 20, 1942 - Romilly-sur-Seine
December 30, 1942 - Lorient (Piloted by Lt. James A. Verinis)
January 3, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
January 13, 1943 - Lille, France
January 23, 1943 - Lorient, France
February 14, 1943 - Hamm, Germany
February 16, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
February 27, 1943 - Brest, France
March 6, 1943 - Lorient, France
March 12, 1943 - Rouen, France
March 13, 1943 - Abbeville, France
March 22, 1943 - Wilhemshaven, Germany
March 28, 1943 - Rouen, France
March 31, 1943 - Rotterdam, Holland
April 16, 1943 - Lorient, France
April 17, 1943 - Bremen, Germany
May 1, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
May 13, 1943 - Meaulte, France (Piloted by Lt. C.L. Anderson)
May 14, 1943 - Kiel, Germany (Piloted by Lt. John H. Miller)
May 15, 1943 - Wilhelmshaven, Germany
May 17, 1943 - Lorient, France
May 19, 1943 - Kiel (flown by Lt. Anderson)

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

 P-51 Mustangs of the 20th Fighter Group, flying out of Kings Cliffe to engage Me109s from JG77 in a furiously contested dogfight. Below them a formation of B-17s from the 379th Bomb Group fly through the chaos, doggedly maintaining their course, as they head on to attack the huge synthetic oil refinery at Meresburg, southern Germany, on 11 September 1944. So vital was this refinery to the Nazi war machine that it became one of the most heavily defended targets in Germany, the air defences even surpassing those of Berlin.

Clash of Eagles by Anthony Saunders. (B)
£250.00
 B-17 Fortresses of the Bloody Hundredth- the Eighth Air Forces 100th Bomb Group - return to Thorpe Abbotts following a raid on enemy oil refineries, September 11, 1944. Nicolas Trudgians moving tribute to the Bloody Hundredth shows the imaginatively named B-17, Heaven Can Wait, on final approach to Thorpe Abbotts after the intense battle on September 11, 1944. Skilfully piloted by Harry Hempy, the seriously damaged B-17G has struggled 500 miles home on two engines to make it back to England. They lost their tail gunner that fateful day. Below the descending bomber stream, an agricultural traction engine peacefully ploughs the wheat stubble in preparation for next year's vital crop, the farm workers oblivious to the unimaginable traumas so recently experienced by the crews of the returning B-17 Fortresses. <br><br>Signed by four pilots and crew who flew with the 100th Bomb Group in Europe during World War II.  <br>Published in 1999 - Issue price was £120.

Heaven Can Wait by Nicolas Trudgian.
£150.00
  B-17G 42-37755 NV-A 325th Bomb Squadron, 92nd Bomb Group from Poddington crash landing in Switzerland on 25th February 1944 after sustaining damage over enemy territory after a raid on Augsburg and Stuttgart.

Safe Pastures by Mark Postlethwaite.
£70.00
 As the sun slowly begins to rise this wintry morning over Thorpe Abbots, Norfolk, ground crew prepare B-17G The All American Girl in an almost surreal setting, for her 99th dangerous mission over enemy territory. On 10th January 1945, 19-year-old pilot, 1st Lt. John Dodrill and his crew went missing on a combat sortie to Cologne. Like many other crews, they made the ultimate sacrifice in the fight for freedom, with the Bloody Hundredth Bombardment Group playing its full part with courage and honour.

Those Golden Moments by Philip West.
£120.00

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Flying FortressIn the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 ½ years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes

Battle of Britain History Timeline : 2nd September
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
2September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O A. T. Rose-Price of 501 Squadron, was Killed.
2September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O O. St. J. Pigg of 72 Squadron, was Killed.
2September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O C. A. DFC Woods-Scawen of 43 Squadron, was Killed.
2September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. C. L. D. Bailey of 46 Squadron, was Killed.
2September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. W. L. DFM Dymond of 111 Squadron, was Killed.
2September1940Feldwebel Erwin Leykauf of JG 54 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Feldwebel Heinz Bär of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Feldwebel Herbert Schramm of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Feldwebel Rudolf Täschner of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Feldwebel Werner Stumpf of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Fuhrer Hans-Joachim Marseille of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Hauptmann Wilhelm Knapp of 3. (F)/Aufklärungs-Gruppe 123 was awarded the Knight's Cross
2September1940Hauptmann Wolfgang Lippert of JG 53 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Leutnant Eberhard Bock of JG 3 shot down a Morane
2September1940Leutnant Erich Meyer of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Leutnant Ernst Terry of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Leutnant Franz Essl of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Leutnant Friedrich-Wilhelm Behrens of JG 54 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Leutnant Gerhard Sprenger of JG 3 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Leutnant Günther Büsgen of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Leutnant Karl Götze of LG 1 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Number of aircraft available for service on this day was 690 with 398 Hurricanes, 204 Spitfires, 60 Blenheims, amd 21 Defiants and 7 Gladiators
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Erich Kuhlmann of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Erich Rudorffer of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Georg Schott of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Heinrich Osswald of JG 3 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Hermann Staege of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Max Bucholz of JG 3 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Oskar Strack of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Siegfried Schnell of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Werner Machold of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Werner Machold of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberfeldwebel Werner Machold of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Obergefreiter Karl-Heinz Boock of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Adolf Buhl of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Friedrich von Schlosheim of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Günther Scholz of JG 54 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Helmut Bennemann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Herbert Ihlefeld of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Herbert Ihlefeld of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Herbert Kunze of JG 77 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Hortari Schmude of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Hortari Schmude of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Kurt Kirchner of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Otto Bertram of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Otto Bertram of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Richard Hausmann of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Oberleutnant Wilhelm Herget of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Wilhelm Hobein of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Oberleutnant Wolfgang Ewald of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Royal Air Force lost 20 aircraft with 10 pilots killed or missing.
2September1940Spitfire K9799 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Spitfire K9840 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Spitfire K9938 Mk.Ia , SD-H, ZP-W, - Shot down by Me109. Crashed near Herne Bay. Sergeant Norfolk parachuted to safety.
2September1940Spitfire N3056 Mk.Ia , XT-B, - Shot down by Me109 near Maidstone. Sergeant Stokoe parachuted to safety but was injured.
2September1940Spitfire P9458 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 over Kent. Pilot Officer O st J Pigg killed.
2September1940Spitfire R6752 Mk.Ia - Wheels up landing at Hornchurch following combat. Pilot Officer Haig ok.
2September1940Spitfire R6769 Mk.Ia - Damaged in night landing accident.
2September1940Spitfire R6806 Mk.Ia , DW-N, - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Spitfire X4105 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Spitfire X4181 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me110 near Gravesend. Flight Lieutenant Gillam parachuted to safety.
2September1940Spitfire X4241 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Spitfire X4262 Mk.Ia - Damaged by Me109 and abandoned near Marden.
2September1940Spitfire X4280 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
2September1940Unteroffizier Hommel of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Arno Zimmermann of JG 54 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Erwin Fleig of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Fritz Auerbach of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Georg Mund of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Unteroffizier Johann Horst of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Kurt Koch of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
2September1940Unteroffizier Otto Riedel of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Rudolf Eiberg of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940Unteroffizier Rudolf Meixner of JG 77 shot down a Spitfire
2September1940the Luftwaffe lost 19 ME109, 5 ME110 , 2 HE111, 5 DO17 and 3 DO215, Flak also shot down 1 ME109 and 3 DO17, with a further probabaly 8
Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 2nd September
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS

 

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