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Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders. - battleofbritainaviationart.com

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Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders.


Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders.

The Luftwaffe had done everything in its power to pummel London into submission but they failed. By the end of September 1940 their losses were mounting. For weeks since the early days of September, London had been the main target for the Luftwaffe and during that time Luftwaffe High Command had grown increasingly despondent as their losses steadily mounted. Far from being on the brink of collapse RAF Fighter Command, though vastly outnumbered, had shown an incredible resilience. The fighting had reached a dramatic climax on Sunday 15th September when, bloodied and bruised, the Luftwaffe had lost the upper hand on a day of intense combat that had culminated with a humiliating retreat. Almost every day that had passed since then had seen the Luftwaffe do everything in its power to pummel London and regain the initiative, but the daylight raids were becoming increasingly costly. On Friday 27th September, 80 days after the Battle of Britain had officially begun, the Luftwaffe came once more, this time concentrating on the fastest bombers they had - Ju88s and Bf110s. And they came in force, principally targeting London and Bristol. Anthony Saunders' superb painting depicts one of these raids, this time by bombers from KG77 as they head over the Medway Estuary, east of the City of London, in an attempt to attack the capital's warehouses and docks. Among the many units defending the capital that day was 92 Squadron from Biggin Hill and Anthony portrays the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Geoffrey Wellum in his dramatic piece. With a deft flick of the rudder Wellum banks his fighter away to port seconds after sharing in the destruction of a Ju88. It was just one of more than 50 German aircraft destroyed by the RAF during the day.
Item Code : DHM6518Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders. - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 275 prints.

Image size 25.5 inches x 17 inches (65cm x 43cm) Paper size 32 inches x 24.5 inches (82cm x 63cm) Wilkinson, Ken
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders


Signature(s) value alone : £40
£110.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders. DHM6518
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 25 artist proofs. Image size 25.5 inches x 17 inches (65cm x 43cm) Paper size 32 inches x 24.5 inches (82cm x 63cm) Wilkinson, Ken
Wellum, Geoffrey
Elkington, John
McInnes, Archibald
Pickering, Tony
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders


Signature(s) value alone : £180
£250.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTCollectors edition of 125 prints. Image size 25.5 inches x 17 inches (65cm x 43cm) Paper size 32 inches x 24.5 inches (82cm x 63cm) Wilkinson, Ken
Wellum, Geoffrey
Elkington, John
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders


Signature(s) value alone : £115
£165.00VIEW EDITION...
REMARQUELimited edition of 25 remarques. Image size 25.5 inches x 17 inches (65cm x 43cm) Paper size 32 inches x 24.5 inches (82cm x 63cm) Wilkinson, Ken
Wellum, Geoffrey
Elkington, John
McInnes, Archibald
Pickering, Tony
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders


Signature(s) value alone : £180
£350.00VIEW EDITION...
REMARQUELimited edition of 10 double remarques. Image size 25.5 inches x 17 inches (65cm x 43cm) Paper size 32 inches x 24.5 inches (82cm x 63cm) Wilkinson, Ken
Wellum, Geoffrey
Elkington, John
McInnes, Archibald
Pickering, Tony
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders


Signature(s) value alone : £180
£550.00VIEW EDITION...

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


Flying Officer Ken Wilkinson (deceased)
*Signature Value : £40

Battle of Britain pilot flying Hurricanes, he flew Spitfires with 611 Sqn and then 616 Sqn at Kirton-in-Lindsey and 19 Sqn at Fowlmere during 1940 and after a spell instructing returned to operations on Spitfires, with 234 and 165 Squadrons. After spending time with 53, 24 and 10 Operational Training Units, he left the RAF in November 1945 and served in the RAFVR.
Ken said :
From 1st September 1939 I wrote myself off. I thought, 'you've got no chance' lasting through whatever is going to be. It was quite obvious, in the way the Germans were moving, they were going to make a hell of a war out of it, so I was ready for war. I can remember saying 'we've got to stop this fellow Hitler'. When you think of all the thousands of citizens that were being killed by this absurd bombing. They had to pay for it didn't they. Yes, we lost people. Friends that didn't come back. I don't think we were the sort of people to brood over it, ever. You have to get into an attitude to make sure that you're as cold as a fish. Once someone has failed to return, that's it. Fortune smiled on me and not on some of the others. I can only say that whoever it was who pooped off at me, wasn't a very good marksman. It transpired that we were doing something far more important than we thought. As far as we were concerned, it was just that there were some untidy creatures from over the other side of the channel, trying to bomb England and the United Kingdom. And we didn't want them to bomb us. After all, we never asked the Germans to start this nonsense, did we? But they did, and we had to stop them, and we did. It's our country. You die for you country.

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

 A telephone rings at a typical flight dispersal: a call from Operations sends pilots and ground crew running for aircraft ready fuelled and armed. A mechanic starts the engine of the spitfire in the foreground and it explodes into life, blasting out blue exhaust gases, the slipstream flattening the grass and kicking up dust. A young sergeant pilot with feelings a mixture of fear and excitement, runs for his machine. The painting captures the tense atmosphere of a much repeated action from these crucial events of over fifty years ago.

Scramble by Gerald Coulson. (B)
£230.00
 Of the many famous combat aircraft to serve their respective countries in the Second World War, two perhaps more than any others, created huge impact and consternation upon seasoned opposing pilots when they first appeared on the battlefront - the Supermarine Spitfire and the Messerschmitt Me262. Both in their day represented enormous advances in aircraft design and power, and both have continued to capture the imagination of aviation enthusiasts ever since. As the war progressed the Spitfire continually upgraded its performance and by the time the Luftwaffes new Me262 turbo-jet arrived on the scene the sleek new Mk XIV, powered by the awesome Griffon engine, was among the fastest piston-engine fighters of the war. The stage was set for a clash between the most powerful piston-engine fighter and the worlds first turbojet, and it was not long before the pilots of these two most advanced combat aircraft met in the hostile skies over western Europe. Ill-advisedly employed by Hitler as the wonder-bomber, the Me262 was initially issued to Bomber Units, one of which being KG51. Tasked with undertaking lightning fast raids upon advancing Allied ground forces, the shark-like jets employed their spectacular speed advantage to surprise, strike and escape. Not to be outdone, the RAF responded with their supremely fast Spitfire XIVs which had already proven themselves highly effective against Germanys V1 flying bombs. In his painting, Nick Trudgian recreates a typical moment: Spitfire Mk XIVs of 41 Squadron have intercepted and damaged a Me262 of KG51 and, with smoke and debris pouring from its damaged Jumo 004 Turbojet, the stricken Luftwaffe jet will be lucky to make it home. A dramatic painting and a fine tribute to the RAFs contribution to the Victory in Europe.

Victory Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian. (FLY)
£2.00
 Major Heinz Schnaufer, with 121 victories, was the top-scoring night fighter ace of all time. He became a Luftwaffe pilot in 1942 and obtained his first victory in June of that year. By August his victory count had reached twenty-two and he was put in command of the 9th Staffel of the IV/BJG1. On the evening of December 16, 1943 Schnaufer downed four RAF Lancaster 4-engine bombers, and on February 21, 1945 he claimed a total of nine Lancasters in one evening. He received the highest award which could be obtained, the Diamonds to the Knights Cross, upon attainment of his 100th victory. Schnaufer survived the War, but was killed in a motoring accident in 1950. As depicted by Stan Stokes in his dramatic painting entitled Top Night Fighter, Schnaufer, who primarily flew the night fighter version of the Messerschmitt Bf-110 Zerstorer, homes in on an RAF Lancaster heavy bomber. The Bf-110 grew out of Herman Gorings specifications for a multipurpose aircraft capable of penetrating deep into enemy airspace to clear the sky of enemy fighters in advance of German bomber formations. The aircraft would also be utilized as a long range interceptor, and as a ground support and ground attack bomber. The Bf-110 prototype first flew in 1936. The prototype was under powered with its Daimier Benz DB 600A engines. Several months passed before a go ahead was given for large scale production which commenced in 1938. Utilizing  improved DB 601 engines, the early production 110s were as fast as any single engine fighter at that time, and had superior fire power. Their biggest apparent weakness was in the areas of armor protection for the crew, and in terms of maneuverability when compared to single seat fighters. The 110 was produced in large numbers and in many different variants. The 110D was the long range model. An additional belly tank was fitted to that aircraft, with several later variants having the more traditional drop tanks. The first serious test for the Bf-110 came during the Battle of Britain. About 300 Bf-110s were involved. They became easy prey for Hurricane and Spitfire pilots, and Bf-109s were often required to assist the 110s in their own defense. On August 15, 1940, which became known as Black Tuesday, the Bf-110s were ravaged by the RAF, and for the month over 100 aircraft were lost. On the Eastern Front the Bf-110 performed admirably in the early stages of Operation Barbarossa. With the Soviet Air Force weakened in the first several weeks of the attack, 110s were effectively utilized in a ground attack role. Ultimately, the Luftwaffe re-equipped a significant number of its 110s as night fighters. The aircraft performed well in this role because it was a good gun platform with sufficient speed to overtake the RAF night bombers. Such night missions were typically carried out with no Allied fighter escort, so the 110 night fighters would not have to engage or elude Allied fighters in this role.

Top Night Fighter by Stan Stokes.
£27.00
<b>Sold out at publisher.  We have the last 120 remaining prints.

Troubleshooters by Gerald Coulson.
£35.00

Battle of Britain History Timeline : 24th September
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
24September1940Canadian Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. Bryson of 92 Squadron, was Killed.
24September1940Feldwebel Hans Stechmann of JG 3 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Gefreiter Kaspar Amhausend of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Hauptmann Günther Frhr. von Maltzahn of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Hauptmann Wolfgang Lippert of II./Jagdgeschwader 27 was awarded the Knight's Cross
24September1940Leutnant Karl Roos of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Luftwaffe lost Two ME109, One ME110, on eJU88. One DO215. Two DO17
24September1940Major Adolf Galland of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
24September1940Number of aircraft available to the Royal Air Force for service on this day was 698 with 380 Hurricanes, 233 Spitfires, 58 Blenheims, amd 19 Defiants and 8 Gladiators
24September1940Oberleutnant Anton Mader of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Hans (Assi) Hahn of 4./Jagdgeschwader 2 was awarded the Knight's Cross
24September1940Oberleutnant Helmut Bennemann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Helmut Bennemann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Helmut Kühle of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Herbert Ihlefeld of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Leesmann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Leesmann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Michael Sonner of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
24September1940Oberleutnant Ulrich Steinhilper of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Ulrich Steinhilper of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Polish Battle of Britain pilot, P/O W. J. Glowacki of 605 and 145 Squadrons, was Killed.
24September1940Royal Air Force lost Five aircraft with two pilots killed
24September1940Unteroffizier Adolf Benzinger of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
24September1940Unteroffizier Eberhard von Boremski of JG 3 shot down a Blenheim
24September1940Unteroffizier Fritz Schweser of JG 54 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Unteroffizier Hugo Dahmer of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 24th September
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
24September1941Former Czech Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt A. Dvorak of 310 Squadron, was Killed.
24September1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O V. M. Bright of 229 Squadron, was Killed.
24September2002Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/Lt. H. P. F. Patten of 64 Squadron, Passed away.

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