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Me109 of JG26 by Graeme Lothian. (P) - battleofbritainaviationart.com


Me109 of JG26 by Graeme Lothian. (P)


Me109 of JG26 by Graeme Lothian. (P)

An Me109 makes a low flight over the English countryside during the Battle of Britain. This painting was a preliminary painting by Graeme in preparation for the larger painting entitled Fighter General. When Graeme traveled to Germany to have prints of Fighter General signed by some of the top German Aces, he took this painting with him, and they have signed it on the back of the canvas.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : DHM6123PMe109 of JG26 by Graeme Lothian. (P) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original Oil on Canvas Painting Graeme Lothian.

SOLD.
Size 18 inches x 14 inches (46cm x 36cm) Krupinski, Walter
Rall, Gunther
Wolfrum, Walter
Galland, Adolf
Duttmann, Peter
+ Artist : Graeme Lothian


Signature(s) value alone : £345
SOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Extra Details : Me109 of JG26 by Graeme Lothian. (P)
About all editions :

A photo of the reverse of the painting, showing the pilot signatures :

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo




General Adolf Galland (deceased)
*Signature Value : £80

Adolf Galland fought in the great Battles of Poland, France and Britain, leading the famous JG26 Abbeville Boys. He flew in combat against the RAFs best including Douglas Bader, Bob Stanford Tuck and Johnnie Johnson. In 1941, at the age of 29, he was promoted to Inspector of the Fighter Arm. In 1942 Hitler personally selected Galland to organise the fighter escort for the Channel Dash. He became the youngest General in the German High Command but open disagreements with Goering led to his dismissal at the end of 1944. He reverted to combat flying, forming the famous JV44 wing flying the Me262 jet fighter, and was the only General in history to lead a squadron into battle. With 104 victories, all in the West, Adolf Galland received the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds. Born 19th March 1912, died 9th February 1996. Born in 1911, Adolf Galland learned to fly at a state-sponsored flying club in the early 1930s. In 1933 he was selected to go to Italy for secret pilot training. Galland flew for a brief time as a commercial airline pilot prior to joining the clandestine Luftwaffe as a Second Lieutenant. In April of 1935 he was assigned to JG-2, the Richtofen Fighter Wing, and in 1937 he joined the ranks of the Condor Legion flying the He-51 biplane fighter in support of General Franco during the Spanish Civil War. Despite flying 280 missions, Galland attained no aerial victories, a rather inauspicious start for a pilot would go on to attain more than 100 aerial victories - the highest for any pilot who flew on the Western Front. During Germanys invasion of Poland, Galland was assigned to an attack squadron and he flew over fifty ground sorties. He was promoted to Captain for his efforts, but Galland was anxious to return to a fighter squadron, and he got his wish in October of 1939 when he was transferred to JG-27. It was with JG-27 that Galland first learned to fly the Bf-109. In May of 1940 JG-27 flew in support of the invasion of Belgium, and Galland achieved his first combat victory on May 12. Two months later his score had risen to more than a dozen, and at this time he was once again transferred to JG-26 situated on the Channel Coast. Engaging the RAF on a daily basis during the Battle of Britain, Gallands score rose steadily until it exceeded 40 victories by September. After a short leave Galland rejoined JG-26 in Brittany, where the squadron played a defensive role. Following Germanys invasion of Russia in June of 1941, JG-26 became one of only two German fighter squadrons left on the Channel Coast. This resulted in plenty of flying, and by late in 1941 Gallands victory totals had reached 70. Following a near brush with death when the fuel tank of his 109 exploded, Galland was grounded for a time, and sent to Berlin where he was made the General of the Fighter Arm, reporting directly to Goring and Hitler. Galland spent most of the next few years carrying out inspection tours, and was at odds with his superiors about the need for an adequate fighter defense to negate ever-increasing Allied bombing of Germanys cities. He continued to fly combat missions when the opportunity presented itself, despite Gorings orders to the contrary. In January of 1945 almost 300 fighters were lost in an all-out attack on Allied airfields in France, a mission Galland did not support. He was dismissed as General of the Fighter Arm for his insubordination, but reflecting his flying abilities Hitler ordered Galland to organize JV-44, Germanys first jet-equipped fighter squadron. By March of 1945 Galland had recruited 45 of Germanys best surviving fighter pilots, and this new squadron was given the difficult task of trying to counter the daily onslaught of 15th Air Force bombers coming at Germany from the South. Gallands final mission of the War occurred on April 26 when he attained his 102nd and 103rd confirmed aerial victories prior to crash landing his damaged Me262. Several days later the War was over for both Galland and Germany. General Galland died in 1996.




General Gunther Rall (deceased)
*Signature Value : £75

A young pilot with III/JG52 at the outbreak of war. He quickly demonstrated his natural ability and leadership qualities, scoring his first air victory early in the Battle of Britain, and by July 1940 was leading 8/JG52. After transfer to the Eastern Front his air victories mounted at an astonishing rate. A crash hospitalised him but within nine months he was back in the cockpit, and, when commanding III/JG52, gained the Wings 500th victory. Gunther fought throughout the war to become the 3rd highest Ace in history with 275 victories. He was awarded the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. Gunther Rall was born on March 10, 1918 in the small Bavarian town of Gaggenau, Baden. Immersing himself in Boy Scout activities during the difficult economic times in Germany following WW 1, Rall finished school in 1936 and joined the German Army. Influenced by a friend, who was a young officer in the Luftwaffe, Rall entered pilots school in 1938. His initial posting was with JG52. He attained his first aerial victory during the Battle of France in May of 1940. During the Battle of Britain JG52 absorbed many casualties, and Rall was promoted to Squadron Commander at the young age of 22. With his fair-hair and smooth complexion the young officer looked even younger than his years. But behind this pleasant exterior was a fierce competitor with the heart of a tiger. Later, Ralls squadron would support the attack on Crete, followed by deployment to the Southern Sector on the Eastern Front. Ralls victory totals began to mount. Following his 37 th victory, GiInther was himself shot down. He was lucky to survive the crash, but with a badly broken back he would spend most of the next year in various hospitals. In Vienna at the University Hospital he would meet his future wife, Hertha. Miraculously, Rall recovered and returned to the Luftwaffe in August of 1942. By November his score exceeded 100 and he was awarded the Oak Leaves to accompany the Knights Cross he was awarded only weeks earlier. As the War progressed against Russia, Rall began to encounter ever more experienced Soviet pilots flying better performing aircraft. Despite this fact, and being shot down several more times himself, Ralls victory tally kept rising. By March of 1944 the ace had attained 273 aerial victories. With the War now going badly for Germany, Rall was transferred to the Western Front. He was able to attain only two more victories against the swarms of Allied bombers and fighter escorts which now pounded Germany every day and night. In May of 1944 Rall was shot down by a P-47. Losing his thumb in the battle he remained out of combat until later in 1944. Ralls final assignments included flying 190Ds as Kornmodore of JG300, and flying the Me-262 jet. Ralls 275 aerial victories (attained on less than 700 combat sorties) make him the third highest scoring ace of all time. If not for the down time suffered as a result of his broken back, Rall might have actually equaled or exceeded Erich Hartmanns alltime record of 352 aerial victories. Rall was not much for socializing during the War. He was a fierce competitor with a businessmans attitude about flying. He was an excellent marksman, and possibly the best deflection shot expert of the War. He continued to fly with the Bundeslufwaffe following the War, serving as its Commander-In Chief in 1970-74. Sadly Gunther Rall died on 4th October 2009.




General Walter Krupinski (deceased)
*Signature Value : £75

Walter Krupinski first saw combat against the RAF on the Western Front. Transferring to the east, he became a Squadron Commander in the legendary JG52. In 1943 his victories reached 150 but, in March 1944 with 177 victories to his name, he was transferred to Germany to command JG11. Flying high altitude Me109s, he chalked up another 12 victories before being wounded. In September 1944 he was promoted Kommandeur of III./JG26 and led them on Operation Bodenplatte before joining Galland's famous JV44. He completed the war with 197 victories in over 1100 missions.

Walter Krupinski, known as Graf Punski or Count Punski in the Jagdwaffe, was a swashbuckling fly-boy with a phenomenal record of 197 aerial victories. Krupinski not only never lost a wingman, but also had the ability to help beginners develop to their full potential. He joined the Luftwaffe in 1939 as a student in the 11th Flying Training Regiment. He first served with the Jagderganzungsgruppe JG52, a combat replacement unit, flying the Me109, in October 1940. By the end of 191, he had earned the Iron Cross 1st class after his seventh victory and was awarded the German Cross in Gold and the Knights Cross one year later after scoring over 52 aerial victories. Krupinski taught the aerial art of closing with the enemy aircraft until it filled the windscreen before firing. It was during this time that the young Erich Hartmann was assigned as Krupinskis wingman. The young and overly enthusiastic Hartmann was seriously struggling in his first attempts at aerial combat, resulting in severe reprimands by the group commander. However, under Krupinskis expert tutelage, Hartmann mastered the art of aerial combat and went on to become the top scoring fighter ace in the world with 352 victories. While still a first lieutenant, Krupinski was selected as Dquadron Commander of 7.JG52 in the spring of 1943. On 5th of July of the same year, he scored victories 80 to 90 - 11 in one day! He later transferred to the Reich Defence in the west with 1./JG5 in the spring of 1944. His units mission was to help halt the Allied strategic bombardment campaign against Germany. Krupinski continued to rack up aerial victories and was awarded Oak Leaves to the Knights Cross after his 177th victory. He was promoted to Captain and became Group Commander of II./JG 11. Later, Krupinski became Group Commander of II./JG 26 Schlageter Group. In March 1945 he joined General Adolf Gallands famed Jagdverband 44 and flew Messerschmitt Me262 jet fighters until the end of the war. After logging a total of 1,100 combat missions, Krupinski was officialy credited with 197 aerial victories. Krupinski was also wounded seven times in aerial combat and received the Verwundetenabzeichen in Gold - the German equivalent of the American Purple Heart. A civilian after the war, Krupinski later joined the new Luftwaffe in 1952 and was promoted to major in 1955. He received jet fighting training from the Royal Air Force and became the first commander of the Jagdbomber Geschwader, Fighter-Bomber Wing - 33. Krupinski flew various jet fighters in the German Air Force, but held dear the last aircraft he flew until his retirement, his beloved F-104G Starfighter. General Krupinski retired as Commander of the German Air Force Tactical Air Command in 1976.

He received the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves. He died 7th October 2000.




Oberleutenant Peter Düttmann (deceased)
*Signature Value : £55

Peter Düttman joined 5/JG-52 in the spring of 1943 and served with that unit until the end of the war when he was a Staffelkapitan. During those two years on the Russian Front Peter flew 395 missions, had 152 victories, including nine in one day, was shot down or crash landed 17 times but was never wounded. His decorations include the Knights Cross and towards the end of the war was recommended for Oak Leaves. Sadly, Peter Duttmann passed away on 9th January 2001. As far as we are aware Peter Duttmann did not sign many art prints, making his signature very rare and highly collectable, escpecially with his high number of victories, making him the 34th highest scoring German Ace of the war.




Walter Wolfrum (deceased)
*Signature Value : £60

Walter Wolfrum first saw combat in the Crimea with 5/JG52. He was shot down three times, and wounded twice before scoring his first victory. With his score at 70 he was again wounded, but returned to take command of 1/JG52 in May 1944, taking part in the fiercely fought defence of the Ploesti oilfields. he was again wounded, but returned to command 1/JG52 until the end of the war. he had flown 423 missions, achieved 137 victories, and was awarded the Knights Cross. Sadly, Walter Wolfrum passed away on 26th August 2010.

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

 There were tens of thousands of aerial combat encounters during World War II. One of the most unusual was a dogfight that took place between Captain Arthur C. Fiedler, Jr. and an unidentified German Bf-109 pilot on June 28, 1944. Fiedler was an Illinois native who received his wings in July 1943. He was assigned as a flight instructor in Dover, Delaware, but in May 1944 he was assigned to the 317th Fighter Squadron of the 325th Fighter Group. Flying P-51B Mustangs the 317th was based in Lesina, Italy. Fiedler named his Mustang after his wife Helen. On a combat mission on June 24th Fiedler claimed a probable. Four days later the eventual ace was flying near Polesti, Rumania when a Bf-109 crossed directly in front of his aircraft. Slamming his P-51 into a near vertical bank he trailed the 109 for a few seconds attaining several hits before his guns jammed. As Fiedler rolled out of his bank he found himself flying in formation parallel to the 109, and headed towards Russia. Fiedler was not willing to make himself a target for the 109, and with his Mustang low on fuel and with jammed guns, Fiedler reactively drew his service revolver. As he drew his .45 pistol, the German pilot unexpectedly jettisoned his canopy and bailed out. Fiedler was given the nickname Svengali for this incident. Fiedler continued his combat tour into 1945, and by January he had attained 8 confirmed aerial victories. Fiedler remained in the Air Force following the War. Flying in both Korea and Vietnam, he was promoted to Colonel in 1969, and retired from the Air Force in 1975. The P-51 Mustang and the Messerschmitt Bf-109 were two of the most important aircraft of WW II. More than 15,000 P-51s were produced, the most of any American-built fighter, while the Bf-109 was the most produced fighter aircraft of the war with 35,000 produced. The P-51 was designed by Raymond Rice and Edgar Schmued of North American Aviation, because the President of the company thought he could do better than merely produce Curtiss P-40s under license for the RAF.  Initially introduced with an Allison liquid-cooled V-12, the P-51 performed poorly despite its superior airframe. As early Mustangs arrived the British were anxious to see how this aircraft would perform with the powerful Rolls Royce Merlin engine. The aircraft was about 13 percent faster and could climb to combat altitude in 45 percent less time than the Allison-equipped aircraft. Going into production as the P-51B the Brits received about 1000 aircraft while the USAAF took an additional 1000. The first P-51B models were in service with the Eighth Air Force in December 1943. The excellent performance of these aircraft and their excellent range when equipped with external wing tanks, made the P-51 a tremendous asset when accompanying American daylight bombers on their raids into Germany. The 109 was arguably the most advanced fighter aircraft from 1935 until 1940. The 109 was designed by Willy Messerschmitt and Walter Rethel with the goal of packing the most powerful engine available into the smallest possible aircraft structure. During the Spanish Civil War the 109 proved its superiority. Despite numerous technical enhancements as the war progressed, by the end of the War the 109 was both outclassed and outnumbered by its rivals.
A Pistol Whipping by Stan Stokes. (GM)
£484.00
 Jagdeschwader 26, or JG 26, was one of the Lufwaffes elite fighter forces. Nicknamed the Abbeville Boys, or the Abbeville Kids,JG 26 gained tremendous notoriety early in the War while operating out of Abbeville in Northern France. Although JG 26 never operated with more than 124 fighter aircraft, the unit dominated its airspace over Northern France and Belgium for more than a two year period. Adolf Galland was one of Germanys top fighter aces of the War, with more than 100 confirmed victories. For most of his flying career Galland was associated with JG 26. By year-end 1940 he had attained 57 victories, and was awarded the Oak Leaves, the highest award of the time. Galland took over command of JG 26 in August 1940 during the Battle of Britain. In Stan Stokes painting, entitled Defiant, But Doomed, Galland is depicted during a mission with the Abbeville Kids on August 28, 1940. Flying low cover for a formation of Heinkel bombers Galland was shocked to see a squadron of 12 Royal Air Force Defiants flying directly below the bombers. The Defiant was a unique British aircraft which was utilized as a daylight fighter incorporating four machine guns enclosed in a top mounted hydraulic turret operated by a gunnery officer. Despite serving admirably during the Dunkirk evacuation, the Luftwaffe had devised tactics which made the Defiant only marginally successful. By utilizing its turret guns RAF 264 Squadron was preparing to decimate the Heinkels with an attack on their vulnerable underbellies. Climbing straight up into the formation Galland broke up the attack. Minutes later he was engaged with the Defiant piloted by 264 Squadron Commander Garvin. Although struck four times by the Defiants machine guns, Galland was ultimately victorious. Gallands JG 26 flew the Messerschmitt Bf-109 (also often referred to as the ME-109) of which over 30,000 were produced. The first large scale production model of the 109 was the E series. Powered by a 12 cylinder water cooled engine the 109e was capable of 360 MPH, and had a ceiling of 33,000 feet. The 109 was very maneuverable and had a very strong airframe capable of sustaining high G maneuvers. Utilizing a low-wing cantilever design, the 109 had retractable landing gear and initially was produced with fuselage mounted machine guns. Galland complained about this configuration and actually modified several of his aircraft to incorporate wing mounted machine guns, which would provide a wider field of fire. A few of these aircraft were utilized during the Spanish Civil War in 1939, and proved vastly superior to anything they faced. The 109, unlike many other fighters which were in service at the start of the War, remained effective for the entire War, and in fact became a de facto standard by which many other aircraft would be judged. Adolf Galland was promoted to General of the Fighter Arm in late 1941, and became preoccupied with fighter tactics for the duration of the War.

Defiant but Doomed by Stan Stokes. (GS)
£294.00
 It was the foundation upon which the Luftwaffe was built and flew throughout WWII.  It was flown by some of the greatest fighter Aces of all time, and credited with more air victories than any other fighter in history.  It was the Messerschmitt Bf109.  One of the finest fighter aircraft ever to take to the skies, the Bf109 was flown by the Luftwaffe's greatest Aces - men like Hartmann, Galland, Rall, Reinert and Krupinski.

JG-52 by Robert Taylor. (AP)
£110.00
 Nicolas Trudgians painting Desert Victory recreates all the atmosphere of the North African desert war with a stunning portrayal of the Me109s of 3./JG-27. The wing is depicted being led by Staffelkapitan Gerhard Homuth as they escort Afrikakorps armor heading for the front line at Gazala, Libya, on February 21, 1942. Flying alongside Homuth, the great Luftwaffe Ace Joachim Marseille scored his 49th and 50th victories on this day, earning his Knights Cross. Below, the crew of an SdKfz 10 light half-track stop to investigate a crashed P-40 Kittyhawk belonging to No 112 Squadron RAF, brought down during an earlier contest.

Desert Victory by Nicolas Trudgian.
£180.00
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Me109Willy Messerschmitt designed the BF109 during the early 1930s. The Bf109 was one of the first all metal monocoque construction fighters with a closed canopy and retractable undercarriage. The engine of the Me109 was a V12 aero engine which was liquid-cooled. The Bf109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War and flew to the end of World War II, during which time it was the backbone of the Luftwaffe fighter squadrons. During the Battle of Britian the Bf109 was used in the role of an escort fighter, a role for which it was not designed for, and it was also used as a fighter bomber. During the last days of May 1940 Robert Stanford-Tuck, the RAF ace, got the chance to fly an Me109 which they had rebuilt after it had crash landed. Stanford-Tuck found out that the Me109 was a wonderful little plane, it was slightly faster than the Spitfire, but lacked the Spitfire manoeuvrability. By testing the Me109, Tuck could put himself inside the Me109 when fighting them, knowing its weak and strong points. With the introduction of the improved Bf109F in the spring of 1941, the type again proved to be an effective fighter during the invasion of Yugoslavia and during the Battle of Crete and the invasion of Russia and it was used during the Siege of the Mediteranean island of Malta. The Bf109 was the main fighter for the Luftwaffe until 1942 when the Fw190 entered service and shared this position, and was partially replaced in Western Europe, but the Me109 continued to serve on the Eastern Front and during the defence of the Reich against the allied bombers. It was also used to good effect in the Mediterranean and North Africa in support of The Africa Korps. The Me109 was also supplied to several German allies, including Finland, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia, and Slovakia. The Bf109 scored more kills than any other fighter of any country during the war and was built in greater numbers with a total of over 31,000 aircraft being built. The Bf109 was flown by the three top German aces of the war war. Erich Hartmann with 352 victories, Gerhard Barkhorn with 301 victories and Gunther Rall with 275 kills. Bf109 pilots were credited with the destruction of 100 or more enemy aircraft. Thirteen Luftwaffe Aces scored more than 200 kills. Altogether this group of pilots were credited with a total of nearly 15,000 kills, of which the Messerschmitt Bf109 was credited with over 10,000 of these victories. The Bf109 was the most produced warplane during World War II, with 30,573 examples built during the war, and the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 units produced up to April 1945. Bf109s remained in foreign service for many years after World War II. The Swiss used their Bf109Gs well into the 1950s. The Finnish Air Force did not retire their Bf109Gs until March 1954. Romania used its Bf109s until 1955. The Spanish Hispanos flew even longer. Some were still in service in the late 1960s.

Battle of Britain History Timeline : 31st August
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
31August1940Anti Aircraft batteries shot down 15 Luftwaffe aircrfat, sveen ME109's one ME110 and seven DO17's
31August1940At 1315 hours Croydon Aerodrome was bombed and the Rollason Aircraft Works were destroyed. Other buildings were damaged including the Redwing Aircraft Factory
31August1940Biggin Hill Aerodrome was twice bombed at 1200 hours and again at 1838 hours Aerodrome, buildings were wrecked, gas and water mains affected and aircraft damaged
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O E. J. Wilcox of 72 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O P. S. DFC Weaver of 56 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O R. McG. Waterston of 603 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O G. H. Maffett of 257 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O M. D. W. A. Doulton of 601 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O R. A. C. Aeberhardt of 19 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. H. M. Starr of 245 & 253 Squadrons, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. H. A. Bolton of 79 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. I. Johnson of 222 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940Czech Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. Stirbacek of 310 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1940Feldwebel Franz Lüders of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Feldwebel Fritz Dettmer of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Feldwebel Fritz Stritzel of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Feldwebel Konrad Jäckel of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Feldwebel Leonhard Kaufmann of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Feldwebel Siegfried Voss of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Flight Lieutenant Kenneth McLeod Gillies of No.66 Sqn RAF shot down a Do215
31August1940Gefreiter Erwin Richey of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hauptmann Rolf Pingel of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hauptmann Wolf-Dietrich Wilcke of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Hornchurch Aerodrome, was attacked twice at 1300 hours and 1800 hours. six aircraft on the gorund were destroyed and four damaged
31August1940It is calculates that 300 German aircraft attacked Great Britain during the night 30th/31st August and 800 during the day of 31st August.
31August1940Leutnant Erich Schmidt of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Gottfried Schlitzer of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Gustav Sprick of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Gustav Sprick of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Hans Berthel of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Hans Berthel of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Hans Christinnecke of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Hans-Ekkehard Bob of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Hans-Ekkehard Bob of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Heinz Ebeling of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Heinz Ebeling of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Heinz Ebeling of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Heinz Schnabel of JG 3 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Hubert Mütherich of JG 77 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Joachim Junghans of ZG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Klaus Mietusch of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Kurt Sidow of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Kurt Votel of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Leutnant Kurt Votel of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Kurt Votel of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Leutnant Wolfgang Kosse of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Major Adolf Galland of JG 26 shot down a Curtiss
31August1940Major Adolf Galland of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Major Adolf Galland of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Major Werner Mölders of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Major Werner Mölders of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Major Werner Mölders of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Major Wolfgang Schellmann of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940No 151 Squadron has moved from Rochford to Duxford.
31August1940No 17 Squadron has moved from Tangmere to Debden
31August1940No 310 Squadron has moved from Duxford to North Weald.
31August1940No 601 Squadron has moved from Debden to Tangmere
31August1940No 610 Squadron has moved from Biggin Hill to Acklington
31August1940No 72 Squadron has moved from Acklington to Biggin Hill
31August1940Number of aircraft available for service on this day was 700 with 417 Hurricanes, 212 Spitfires, 54 Blenheims, amd 13 Defiants and 4 Gladiators
31August1940Oberfahnrich Alfred Wehmeyer of ZG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Adolf Iburg of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Erich Rudorffer of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Franz Willinger of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Fritz Ströhlein of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Fritz Ströhlein of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Fritz Ströhlein of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Heinrich Hott of ZG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Hermann Staege of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Karl Hier of JG 54 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Otto Schulz of JG 27 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Robert Schiffbauer of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Werner Machold of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberfeldwebel Willi Grosse of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Adolf Buhl of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Arnold Lignitz of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Eberhard Henrici of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Ernst Matthes of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Ernst-Hartmann von Schlotheim of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Franz Hahn of JG 77 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Georg Claus of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Gerhard Schöpfel of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans Barschel of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans Barschel of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans Hahn of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans Hahn of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans Hahn of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hans-Joachim Jabs of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Helmut Bennemann of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Helmut Kühle of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Herbert Ihlefeld of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hermann Weeber of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hermann-Friedrich Joppien of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hermann-Friedrich Joppien of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Hubert Grisslich of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Joachim Müncheberg of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Gottfried Nordmann of JG 77 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Gottfried Nordmann of JG 77 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Krahl of JG 2 shot down a Curtiss
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Krahl of JG 2 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Leesmann of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Leesmann of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Leesmann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Lothar Keller of JG 3 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Richard Leppla of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Robert Göbel of JG 52 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Sophus Baagoe of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Walter Horten of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Oberleutnant Walter Schneider of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Oberleutnant Werner Streib of NJG 1 shot down a Hampden
31August1940Oberleutnant Wilhelm Herget of ZG 76 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940RAF flew 192 patrols involving 1016 fighter flights
31August1940RAF lost 37 fighters t with 12 pilots killed
31August1940Spitfire N3110 Mk.Ia - Destroyed by bombs during take off. Pilot ok.
31August1940Spitfire N3233 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 and crash landed at Eastchurch. Flight Lieutenant Robinson injured.
31August1940Spitfire N3249 Mk.Ia , GR-P, - Damaged on operations and crash landed at Bilbury.
31August1940Spitfire P9323 Mk.Ia , ZD-F, - Shot down by Me109s at Isle of Sheppey. Sergeant Speares parachuted to safety.
31August1940Spitfire P9337 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 at Ashford. Pilot Officer Davies injured.
31August1940Spitfire P9360 Mk.Ia - Destroyed during air raid on Hornchurch.
31August1940Spitfire P9424 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
31August1940Spitfire P9438 Mk.Ia - Damaged by Me109 near Dungeness and crashed near New Romney. Flight Lieutenant Smith parachuted to safety.
31August1940Spitfire P9457 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 near Dungeness. Flying Officer E J Wilcox killed.
31August1940Spitfire P9497 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
31August1940Spitfire P9505 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
31August1940Spitfire R6628 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 and crashed at Bishopsbourne. Sergeant Johnson killed.
31August1940Spitfire R6629 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
31August1940Spitfire R6835 Mk.Ia , XT-W, - Damaged on operations.
31August1940Spitfire R6895 Mk.Ia - Damaged by bombs on take off.
31August1940Spitfire R6912 Mk.Ia - Damaged by Me109 and crash landed. Pilot Officer Aeberhardt killed.
31August1940Spitfire R6928 Mk.Ia - destroyed during air raid at Biggin Hill.
31August1940Spitfire R6958 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 near North Weald. Flying Officer Brinsden parachuted to safety.
31August1940Spitfire X4054 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Hurricane near Manston. Sergeant Gibbons parachuted to safety.
31August1940Spitfire X4231 Mk.Ia - Damaged by return fire from Do17s and abandoned. Flying Officer J B Coward parachuted to safety, but required leg amputation.
31August1940Spitfire X4235 Mk.Ia - Damaged on take off.
31August1940Spitfire X4236 Mk.Ia - Damaged by bombs on take off from Hornchurch.
31August1940Spitfire X4271 Mk.Ia , XT-N, - Shot down by Me109 and crashed at Wanstead. Pilot Officer Gilroy parachuted to safety.
31August1940Spitfire X4273 Mk.Ia , XT-K, - Collided with Me109 near Ilford. Flying Officer R M Waterston killed.
31August1940The RAF shot down 70- aircrfat plsu anotoher 34 unconfirmed. These were 39 ME109's ith upto 21 mE109 more, 9 ME110 and five more unconfirmed, six HE111 and 1 JU88 five DO17 plus a further twounconfirmed Ten DO215 with a further 6 unconfirmed
31August1940Unteroffizier Erwin Fleig of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Unteroffizier Franz Sander of ZG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Unteroffizier Herbert Lange of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Unteroffizier Hugo Dahmer of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Unteroffizier Hugo Dahmer of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
31August1940Unteroffizier Karl Willius of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
31August1940Unteroffizier Richard Heller of ZG 26 shot down a Spitfire
Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 31st August
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
31August1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O R. Mottram of 92 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1943Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. B. E. Dye of 219 Squadron, was Killed.
31August1943Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. F. N. Robertson of 66 Squadron, was Killed.

 

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