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The Element of Surprise by Robert Barbour. - battleofbritainaviationart.com

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The Element of Surprise by Robert Barbour.


The Element of Surprise by Robert Barbour.

On 20th October 1943, Wildcat and Avenger aircraft from the Carrier US Core, on patrol north of the Azores, surprised U378, a type VIIC U-boat which had been active in that area. The element of surprise was so complete that the submarines guns remained unmanned throughout the action.
Item Code : DHM0760The Element of Surprise by Robert Barbour. - This Edition
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1250 prints.

Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)Artist : Robert BarbourHalf
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Tough as Nails by Stan Stokes. (C)
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Other editions of this item : The Element of Surprise by Robert Barbour DHM0760
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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)Artist : Robert Barbour10 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 90.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTPresentation edition of 5 prints from the signed limited edition of 1250 prints. Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm) Merten, Karl-Friedrich (matted)
Scholtz, Klaus (matted)
+ Artist : Robert Barbour


Signature(s) value alone : 130
200.00VIEW EDITION...
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Origina watercolour painting by Robert Barbour.Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Robert Barbour200 Off!Now : 700.00VIEW EDITION...

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

On 20th October 1943, Wildcat and Avenger aircraft from the Carrier US Core, on patrol north of the Azores, surprised U378, a type VIIC U-boat which had been active in that area. The element of surprise was so complete that the submarines guns remained unmanned throughout the action.
The Element of Surprise by Robert Barbour (AP)
90.00
 The Grumman F4F Wildcat was the third monoplane to see carrier service with the Navy. It was also the fighter aircraft which would carry the brunt of the fighting in the Pacific until 1943 when the F6F Hellcat would enter service. The Wildcat was flow by both USN and USMC aviators. The Wildcat lacked the range and maneuverability of the Mitsubishi Zeros it often faced, but the Wildcat was more heavily armed and able to take a lot more punishment than the Mitsubishis. Most of the pilots which obtained ace status while flying the F4F obtained most of their victories against Japanese bombers and reconnaissance aircraft. Eight individuals were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor while displaying valor while in command of an F4F. The pilots of no other aircraft during WW II were as highly decorated. One of the most outstanding of this elite group was USMC Captain Joseph Jacob Foss. Foss, a South Dakota native, had been accepted as a naval aviation cadet following his graduation from the University of South Dakota. Foss had already learned to fly on his own, and had no difficulty earning his wings. Foss flew with VMF-121 in Guadacanal in 1942 and early 1943. He was credited with 26 confirmed aerial victories, making him the first American aviator to reach the victory record of the famed Captain Eddie Rickenbacker, one of Joes boyhood heroes. The ground based fighter pilots in Guadacanal were often referred to as The Cactus Air Force.  As the Executive Officer of VMF-121 flying out of Henderson Field, Joes amazing victory tally helped make VMF-121 the highest scoring Marine squadron of the War. The success at Guadacanal was not without a heavy price. More than 20% of VMF-121s pilots did not return from the campaign. The squadrons best combat day in Guadacanal was on October 25, 1942. Eighteen aerial victories were credited to the squadron, with Foss leading the way with five Zeros bagged on two combat missions. Because it was impossible to permanently assign aircraft at Guadacanal, Foss flew several different Wildcats, including those numbered 53, 50, and 84. Nicknamed Swivel-Neck-Joe by some his fellow pilots, Foss learned early that it did not pay to be surprised by the opposition. Foss also leaned that the most effective way to down an opposing aircraft was to get as close to it as possible before utilizing ones limited supply of ammunition. As depicted in Stan Stokes painting entitled Tough As Nails, Joe Foss is tangling with a F1M2 Pete on November 7, 1942. Joes first pass over the much slower float plane proves ineffective, and the Petes gunner actually stars the portside glass of Foss windscreen. Circling around, and approaching from below, the Pete would soon become his eighteenth victory. Returning from this mission Foss would have to ditch his aircraft. He was rescued by missionaries and returned to combat flying the next day. Joes second combat tour in 1943 was cut short due to the ongoing effects of a bout with malaria. Joe served in the Air Force Reserve after the War reaching the rank of Brigadier General. Following a successful career in both politics and professional sports, Foss has remained active and was instrumental in the formation of the American Fighter Aces Association, and has served as President of the NRA.
Tough as Nails by Stan Stokes.
28.00
 Arguably the most important piston-engined single-seat fighter design ever to see service with the US Navy and Marine Corps, the aesthetically inelegant F4F Wildcat achieved much acclaim during its bloody frontline career. Thrown into combat at Coral Sea, Midway and Guadalcanal, the handful of Wildcat units of the Navy and Marine Corps took on large numbers of fighters and bombers and came out victorious. On the European front, the Royal Navys Fleet Air Arm also put the fighter to effective use from escort carriers, protecting Atlantic convoys from Luftwaffe attacks.
Wildcat Aces of World War Two.
12.99
 Pearl Harbor - Monday December 8th, 1941.  On Sunday December 7th, 1941, the free world had been stunned into disbelief by the treacherous Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  Giving no formal declaration of war, the devastating Japanese assault on the headquarters of the US Pacific Fleet had left over two thousand American servicemen dead, most of her battleships destroyed or damaged, and the remains of nearly 200 American aircraft lay in tatters.  America reeled from the shock and sheer incredulity.  But for Admiral Yamamoto, Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Navy, and architect of the attack on Pearl Harbor, the success of victory left a bitter taste.  The main targets of his carefully orchestrated plan had been the US carriers but, as fate would have it, they were all at sea.  Yamamoto knew in his heart that he would have to face those carriers one day, and when he did they would be the platform upon which America would unleash the brunt of her power against him.  At 12.30 the following day President Roosevelt began his address to Congress, calling for the declaration of war on Japan.  By 4.10pm America was formally at war, and five thousand miles away the first of the carriers, USS Enterprise, was returning to Pearl Harbor.  Richard Taylor's painting depicts the Enterprise as she approaches Ford Island and the smoldering ruins that had been the Pacific Fleet.  As ships still burn and the thick smoke hangs in the air, ever alert F4F-3A Wildcats of VF-6 fly an overhead patrol.  Throughout the night the carrier will refuel and re-arm, and at dawn she will return to sea with a steel resolve and a new mission, to avenge Pearl Harbor.  The Japanese failure to destroy the US carriers was a fateful mistake and, six months later, the Enterprise finally got her chance at the Battle of Midway, as the US carriers delivered one of the most decisive victories in the history of naval warfare, paving the way for victory in the Pacific.
The Sleeping Giant Awakes by Richard Taylor. (AP)
145.00

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Avenger
WildcatF4F

Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 1st May
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
1May1942Former New Zealand Battle of Britain pilot, F/O H. L. North of 43 Squadron, was Killed.
1May1982Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O F. H. P. Connor of 234 Squadron, Passed away.

 

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