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Jet Interceptor by Nicolas Trudgian. (B) - battleofbritainaviationart.com


Jet Interceptor by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)


Jet Interceptor by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)

Herbert Ihlefelds personal He162 White 23 - the revolutionary Heinkel Peoples Fighter - on patrol with JG1.This aircraft was captured intact and is today preserved in the National Air & Space Museum in Washington DC.

Published 2000.
Item Code : DHM2441BJet Interceptor by Nicolas Trudgian. (B) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of publishers proofs.

Paper size 18 inches x 12 inches (46cm x 31cm) Wollenweber, Wolgang
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £45
Half
Price!
Now : £125.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Jet Interceptor by Nicolas Trudgian.DHM2441
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 250 prints, supplied double matted.

Last 40 copies available of this sold out edition.
Paper size 18 inches x 12 inches (46cm x 31cm) Ihlefeld, Herbert (matted)
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £55
£250.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs, supplied double matted.

We have 4 prints left of this edition, now with an additional signature.
Paper size 18 inches x 12 inches (46cm x 31cm) Ihlefeld, Herbert (matted)
Wollenweber, Wolgang
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £100
£40 Off!Now : £280.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Wollenweber signature edition of 20 artist proofs from the edition of 50 artist proofs. Paper size 18 inches x 12 inches (46cm x 31cm) Wollenweber, Wolgang
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £45
£40 Off!Now : £200.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTWollenweber signature edition of 30 prints from the signed limited edition of 250 prints. Paper size 18 inches x 12 inches (46cm x 31cm). Wollenweber, Wolgang
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £45
£50 Off!Now : £130.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : Jet Interceptor by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
About all editions :

A photo of an edition of the print :

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


Oberleutnant Wolfgang Wollenweber
*Signature Value : £45

After his flight training Wolfgang was transferred to JG5 in the Arctic where he flew the Me110 on escort missions over the North Atlantic, Murmansk and Russia, he was then awarded the Iron Cross First Class. After this he retrained on the Fw190 fighter aircraft and rocket fighter Me163. Wolfgang flew the Heinkel He162 as a Squadron Leader of the first jet fighter squadron. This revolutionary jet was demanding even for the most experienced pilots, many of them did not survive, but miraculously he survived 14 missions on this aircraft.

Some other related items available from this site, matching the aircraft, squadron or signatures of this item.

Cape Malyj-Korabelnye, Russia, 18th August 1943.  While escorting Fw190s to attack Soviet shipping, ObLt. Schuck's flight of Me109G2s from 8./JG5 attacked the four Soviet Hurricanes of 78 IAP/VVS which were on patrol over the boats.  The Soviet formation leader, Mladshiy Leytenant Valeriy Kiritshenko, ordered his men to form a defensive Lufbery circle but this proved inadequate protection against Schucks determined attack.  Breaking into the Ring he first downed Kitshenko, and then pursued and shot down a second Hurricane.

Breaking the Ring by David Pentland. (AP)
£80.00
 It was in 1941 that the remarkable Focke-Wulfe FW190 first appeared in the skies of Europe, quickly establishing itself as a most formidable adversary. It proved to be the supreme weapon against all allied bomber forces. Here FW190A-8 of 1 Gruppe, Jagdgesschwader 1 is shown attacking a B17G of 381st Bomb Group during a critical defence of the Reich in 1944.

Cat Among the Pigeons (FW190) by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
£370.00
 It was in 1941 that the remarkable Focke-Wulfe FW190 first appeared in the skies of Europe, quickly establishing itself as a most formidable adversary. It proved to be the supreme weapon against all allied bomber forces. Here FW190A-8 of 1 Gruppe, Jagdgesschwader 1 is shown attacking a B17G of 381st Bomb Group during a critical defence of the Reich in 1944.

Cat Among the Pigeons (FW190) by Ivan Berryman.
£60.00
Hermann W. Goering was born in Rosenheim, a small town near Munich, in 1893. He received an appointment to a military school, and became a flyer during WW I. He attained an excellent combat and leadership record, and was the last individual to command the famed Richtofen Flying Circus. Following the War he studied history, married, but was drifting aimlessly until he met Adolf Hitler. When Hitler came to power Goering was made economic czar, and authorized to implement a four year plan which would prepare the German economy for war. Goerings greatest personal interest was in the Luftwaffe, and ultimately Field Marshal Goering was made Chief of the Luftwaffe. The Luftwaffe performed admirably in the blitzkrieg attacks on Poland and the Benelux countries. However, Goering feared Britains entry into the War, and personally worked diplomatic channels to keep Britain out of the conflict. The Luftwaffes first defeat was in the Battle of Britain, where it was unable to wrest control of the sky from the Royal Air Force. As the War progressed, Goering supported Hitler, even though it appears he felt that the War was lost. In 1943 and 1944 Germany was devastated by massive Allied bombing attacks. Not enough resources were committed to the defense of Germanys cities, as Hitler became preoccupied with the struggle against the Soviet Union, and his desire to develop terror weapons to defeat Britain. Despite its strategic errors, the Luftwaffe developed some of the most advanced aircraft of the War including the Me-262 jet and the tail-less, rocket-powered Me-163 Comet, probably the most technically advanced aircraft of the War. Out of necessity, German aircraft designers compressed decades of development time into years or often months. Although it did not play a significant role in combat, the 163 represented a radical departure from conventional aircraft design. With a length of only 19 feet, the diminutive 163 was powered by a liquid fuel rocket engine. The production models of the Comet were fueled with a mixture of C-Stoff (a mixture of 57% methyl alcohol, 13% hydrazine hydrate, and 13% water) and T-Stoff which was 80% hydrogen peroxide. Almost 5000 pounds of fuel were carried, but the Comets engine had a burn time of only a few minutes. Many technological breakthroughs were required for the Comet program to succeed. Because space and weight were so critical, use of a conventional landing gear was not possible. Instead the 163 utilized a simple dolly consisting of an axle and two wheels which was jettisoned upon takeoff. For landing the 163 utilized a sturdy retractable skid with hydraulic shock absorbers. The Comet was also not particularly effective in combat despite its 596-MPH top speed and twin canon. The aircraft had only about 150 seconds of power once it reached altitude. Thereafter it became a very fast glider. Allied pilots learned to exploit the 163s vulnerability during landing.  Rudolf Opitz, the Chief Test Pilot on the 163, was a central figure in the development and testing of the 163. Rudy met Herman Goering once at a special airshow for high ranking military and government officials. The few remaining 163s to survive the War are due to the efforts of Rudy to preserve this unique aircraft for aviation posterity.

Herman's Comet by Stan Stokes. (D)
£70.00

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
He162Heinkel He 162 Volksjäger Known as the peoples Fighter, named after the Volksstrum was a single-engine, jet-powered fighter aircraft built by Germany for the Luftwaffe at the end of World War Two. Designed and built quickly, and made primarily of wood as metals were in very short supply and prioritized for other aircraft, the He162 was nevertheless the fastest of the first jets that flew in the Luftwaffe and faster than the first Allied jet fighters. Volksjäger was the Reich Air Minstrys official name for the He162. The He162 was also well known by another name - the Salamander, which was the codename of its construction program, and Spatz (Sparrow), which was the name given to the plane by the builders Heinkel. In February 1945 the He162 began operations with deliveries of the He 162 to its first operational unit, I./JG 1 The He 162s only had 30-minute fuel capacity which caused problems, as at least two of JG 1s pilots were killed attempting emergency landings after exhausting their fuel.

Battle of Britain History Timeline : 25th July
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
25July1940AA claim an enemy aircraft shot down in flames near Milford Haven.
25July1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/Lt. A. T. Smith of 610 Squadron, was Killed.
25July1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O A. J. O. DFC Jeffery of 64 Squadron, was Killed.
25July1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O B. H. Way of 54 Squadron, was Killed.
25July1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O A. Finnie of 54 Squadron, was Killed.
25July1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O G. K. Gout of 234 Squadron, was Killed.
25July1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. H. Culverwell of 87 Squadron, was Killed.
25July1940During a raid on Portsmouth, one Geman aircraft was confirmed shot down and another is probable.
25July1940During continued raids on Dover 14 enemy aircraft confirmed destroyed and an additional 11 probables with the loss of four Spitfires
25July1940Flying Officer Peter E C Strahan of No.33 Sqn RAF shot down a CR42
25July1940Hauptmann Ernst Wiggers of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940Hauptmann Horst Tietzen of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940Hauptmann Joachim Schlichting of JG 27 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940Hauptmann Walter Oesau of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940He111 was shot down between the Orkneys and Kinnaird's Head
25July1940Leutnant Gerhard Müller-Dühe of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940Leutnant Hans-Otto Lessing of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940Leutnant Herbert Wasserzier of JG 27 shot down a Blenheim
25July1940Leutnant Josef Bürschgens of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940Leutnant Otto Decker of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940Leutnant Walter Blume of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940Major Adolf Galland of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940Number of aircraft available for service on this day was 639 with 316 Hurricanes, 234 Spitfires, 56 Blenheims, amd 8 Defiants
25July1940Oberfeldwebel Karl Schmid of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940Oberleutnant Georg Beyer of JG 26 shot down a Spitfire
25July1940One Hurricane was shot down by a Ju88 which in turn was shot down by a training aircraft
25July1940Six enemy aircraft were shot down between the Needles and Portland with the loss of one Spitfire
25July1940Spitfire K9901 Mk.Ia , DL-D, - Hit by return fire from Ju87 and abandoned 5 miles south of Portland.
25July1940Spitfire L1035 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 off Kent coast at 18.00hrs. S/Lt Dawson-Paul rescued by enemy boats but died later.
25July1940Spitfire L1055 Mk.Ia - Damaged by Ju88 off Dover. S/Ldr MacDonnell ok.
25July1940Spitfire N3231 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
25July1940Spitfire P9327 Mk.Ia - Damaged on operations.
25July1940Spitfire P9387 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 near Dover. P/O Turley-George ok.
25July1940Spitfire P9421 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 off Dover. F/O Jeffery killed.
25July1940Spitfire P9493 Mk.Ia - Flew into ground on night patrol near Porthdown, Cornwall. P/O Gout killed.
25July1940Spitfire R6693 Mk.Ia , DW-A, - Stalled on approach and dived into ground at Hawkinge. Sgt Smith killed.
25July1940Spitfire R6707 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 over convoy nr Dover F/Lt Way killed.
25July1940Spitfire R6816 Mk.Ia - Shot down by Me109 off Dover. P/O Finnie killed.
25July1940Unteroffizier Edmund Rossmann of JG 52 shot down a Bréguet 690
25July1940Unteroffizier Karl Born of JG 27 shot down a Blenheim
25July1940Unteroffizier Paul Obst of JG 51 shot down a Spitfire
Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 25th July
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
25July1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, (F.A.A.) Lt. A. T. J. Kindersley of 808 Squadron, was Killed.

 

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