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Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*

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Joining 153 Sqn flying Defiants, changing to Beaufighters. In 1943 he flew Beaufighters in Malta. With 89 Sqn he crashed in Tunisia, having to walk home 65 miles through the Sahara Desert. Went from 89 Sqn to 108 Sqn and then as an instructor teaching night flying. Joined 456 Sqn RAAF before D-Day, finishing the war on Intruder missions and 6 air victories. He became acting CO of 456 Sqn.


Awarded the Distinguished Flying CrossAwarded a Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross
Distinguished
Flying Cross
Bar to the
Distinguished
Flying Cross

Items Signed by Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*

 Flying the high speed low level Day Ranger missions in the Mosquito was one of the most exhilarating forms of aerial combat experienced by aircrews in WWII.  Given a free hand at squadron level to select targets of opportunity deep inside enemy held......Rangers on the Rampage by Robert Taylor. (APB)
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Flying the high speed low level Day Ranger missions in the Mosquito was one of the most exhilarating forms of aerial combat experienced by aircrews in WWII. Given a free hand at squadron level to select targets of opportunity deep inside enemy held......NOT
AVAILABLE
Flying the high speed low level Day Ranger missions in the Mosquito was one of the most exhilarating forms of aerial combat experienced by aircrews in WWII.  Given a free hand at squadron level to select targets of opportunity deep inside enemy held ......Rangers on the Rampage by Robert Taylor. (B)
SOLD OUT
Flying the high speed low level Day Ranger missions in the Mosquito was one of the most exhilarating forms of aerial combat experienced by aircrews in WWII. Given a free hand at squadron level to select targets of opportunity deep inside enemy held ......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*

Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*

Squadrons for : Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.108 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 11th November 1917
Fate : Disbanded 28th March 1945

Viribus contractis - With gathering strength

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.108 Sqn RAF

No.108 Sqn RAF

The unit was formed at Stonehenge in November 1917, and was equipped with Airco DH.9 bombers. In July 1918, the squadron went to Capelle, Dunkirk, equipped with DH.9s for day-bombing operations against targets in North-West Belgium. In October 1918, it moved to Bisseghem, Belgium, and remained based there until the Armistice. During its service overseas the squadron made 59 successful bombing raids, 40 reconnaissance flights, two photographic flights, dropped approximately 70 tons of bombs, and shot down nine enemy aircraft (a further 20 were reported shot down, but were not confirmed).[ Disbanded in July 1919, the squadron did not reappear in the order of battle until January 1937, when it was re-formed as No 108 (Bomber) Squadron at Upper Heyford. On the day before the outbreak of World War 2 it became a No. 6 Group training squadron and in April 1940, was absorbed into No 13 OTU. On 1 August 1941, No. 108 reformed at Kabrit as a night bomber Squadron. Its Wellingtons began bombing raids on the 22 September, targets being ports on the Libyan coast and in Greece. In November it began to receive Liberators and these supplemented the Wellingtons until June 1942. On the 18 December 1942 the Squadron was reduced to a cadre which was disbanded on 25 December 1942. On 15 March 1943 No. 108 reformed at Shandur as a night fighter Squadron. Its Beaufighters flew night patrols over Egypt, Libya and Malta and were supplemented by Mosquitoes in February 1944. The latter were used for intruder missions until withdrawn in July while the Beaufighters moved back to Libya for intruder operations over Greece and the Aegean. In October 1944 the Squadron moved to Greece and became involved in the attempted Communist take-over of the country in December. After taking part in attacks on rebel positions until the uprising was quelled, the Squadron gave up its aircraft and sailed for Italy in March 1945, disbanding on 28 March 1945.

No.153 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 4th November 1918
Fate : Disbanded 2nd July 1958

Noctividus - Seeing by night

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.153 Sqn RAF

No.153 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.456 Sqn RAAF

Country : Australia
Founded : 30th June 1941
Fate : Disbanded 15th June 1945

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.456 Sqn RAAF
No.456 Sqn RAAF

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*
A list of all aircraft associated with Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Beaufighter



Click the name above to see prints featuring Beaufighter aircraft.

Manufacturer : Bristol
Production Began : 1940
Number Built : 5564

Beaufighter

BRISTOL BEAUFIGHTER The Bristol Beaufighter was a Torpedo Bomber and had a crew of two. with a maximum speed of 330mph and a ceiling of 29,000 feet. maximum normal range of 1500 miles but could be extended to 1750 miles. The Bristol Beaufighter carried four 20mm cannon in the belly of the aircraft and upto six .303in browning machine guns in the wings. it could also carry eight 3 -inch rockets, 1605 lb torpedo or a bomb load of 1,000 lb. The Bristol Beaufighter first flew in July 1939 and with some modifications entered service with the Royal Air Force in July 1940. In the winter of 1940 - 1941 the Beaufighter was used as a night fighter. and in March 1941 the aircraft was used at Coastal Command as a long range strike aircraft. and in 1941, the Beaufighter arrived in North Africa and used as a forward ground attack aircraft. The Bristol Beaufighter was used also in India, Burma and Australia. A total of 5,564 Beaufighters were built until production in Britain finished in 1945, but a further 364 were built in Australia for the Australian Air Force

Defiant



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Manufacturer : Boulton Paul
Production Began : 1939
Number Built : 1075

Defiant

BOULTON PAUL DEFIANT Built as a fighter, with a crew of two. Maximum speed of 304 mph, and a ceiling of 30,350 feet. armament on the defiant was four .303 browing machine guns in the Boulton Paul Turret. Designed as a intercepter fighter, the Defiant first flew in August 1937. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in October 1939 with no 264 squadron. and first flew in operations in march 1940 the Boulton Paul Defiant was certainly no match for the German Fighters, due to their lack of fire power as the defiant had no wing mounted machine guns. Heavy losses. The aircraft was re deployed as a night -Fighter in the autumn of 1940. This role also being taken over by Bristol Beaufighters in 1941, leaving the defiant for training, target tug, and air-sea rescue roles. A Total of 1075 Boulton Paul Defiant's were built

Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 20th November
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