Order Enquiries (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
Product Search         
Aircraft
Search
Squadron
Search
Signature
Search
SPECIAL
OFFERS

(Allied) Pilot Search :

CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL BATTLE OF BRITAIN PRINTS BY TITLE

Flt. Lt. Michael Penny

No Photo Available

His war service began in October 1940 at I.TW. Newquay. On completion of his training he was posted to No. 24 E. F.T.S. Luton. After 11 hours dual flying he first flew solo in a Miles Magister. After forty hours instruction he was posted to No. 9 S.F.T.S. Hullavington for advanced flying on Miles Masters and Hurricanes. On completing this course he was presented with his "Wings", having now flown 62 hours. His next posting was to No. 60 O.T.U. at East Fortune where he converted to B & P Defiants. "The Defiant was a very unpleasant aircraft to fly, very heavy and I did not like the idea of becoming a night fighter in this aircraft" said Michael. He was then posted to No. 153 Squadron in Northern Ireland; after only a few days the Squadron was disbanded and he was given a chance to convert to Beaufighters or stay on 'singles'. Michael requested training for Spitfires but was informed that there were no vacancies at that moment in time. He then asked if he could fly Lysanders being used to tow drogues. His request was granted and he flew Lysanders until January 1943 when his posting came through to 58 O.T.U. Grangemouth. He completed 50 hours on Spitfires and was posted to 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron 124 Airfield, Lasham. Michael recalls, "Although we were operational, we were now in 2 nd T. A. F. and most of our flying was done in cooperation with the Army and Tank Cor. This involved continual very low flying and demanded very strict air flying discipline - this held me in good stead as time went on". In May 1943 the Squadron moved to 121 Airfield Fairlop where he flew his first operation over occupied Europe on a fighter sweep over Rouen, followed by an escort op. with Ventura bombers to Zeebruger; this was his first experience of enemy antiaircraft fire. Various escort and fighter sweeps followed. There followed a series of moves to various airfields in Sussex and Kent. In early 1944 the Squadron, then stationed at Ford, had bombs fitted to our aircraft for dropping on V1 launch sites. "We began our dive at about 10,000 feet and released our bomb at 5000 feet - a most unpleasant experience. This brought us into range from all kinds of anti-aircraft fire, but fortunately we suffered very few direct hits," Michael recalls. After completing over 120 operations Michael was posted "tour expired" by the Air Comm. and went on to become a Spitfire flying instructor. He was demobilised in November 1945.

Items Signed by Flt. Lt. Michael Penny

One summers evening, Douglas Bader (flying Mk V Spitfire without cannons) and Johnnie Johnson (flying the Mk VB Spitfire with cannons) of the Tangmere Wing, share a few moments of peaceful flying whilst on patrol over the English Channel. ......
Spitfire Patrol by Philip West.
Price : £195.00
One summers evening, Douglas Bader (flying Mk V Spitfire without cannons) and Johnnie Johnson (flying the Mk VB Spitfire with cannons) of the Tangmere Wing, share a few moments of peaceful flying whilst on patrol over the English Channel. ......

Quantity:
 One summers evening, Douglas Bader (flying Mk V Spitfire without cannons) and Johnnie Johnson (flying the Mk VB Spitfire with cannons) of the Tangmere Wing, share a few moments of peaceful flying whilst on patrol over the English Channel. ......
Spitfire Patrol by Philip West (AP)
Price : £250.00
One summers evening, Douglas Bader (flying Mk V Spitfire without cannons) and Johnnie Johnson (flying the Mk VB Spitfire with cannons) of the Tangmere Wing, share a few moments of peaceful flying whilst on patrol over the English Channel. ......

Quantity:
High over the southern coast of England in 1940 a Spitfire (Mk 1) of 609 Squadron from Middle Wallop, flown by Flying Officer John Dundas, lies in wait for enemy aircraft (Junkers 87 divebombers) on their way to attack British naval installations at ......Supermarine Spitfire MkI by Philip West.
Price : £60.00
High over the southern coast of England in 1940 a Spitfire (Mk 1) of 609 Squadron from Middle Wallop, flown by Flying Officer John Dundas, lies in wait for enemy aircraft (Junkers 87 divebombers) on their way to attack British naval installations at ......

Quantity:
High over the southern coast of England in 1940 a Spitfire (Mk 1) of 609 Squadron from Middle Wallop, flown by Flying Officer John Dundas, lies in wait for enemy aircraft (Junkers 87 divebombers) on their way to attack British naval installations at ......Supermarine Spitfire MkI by Philip West. (AP)
SOLD OUT
High over the southern coast of England in 1940 a Spitfire (Mk 1) of 609 Squadron from Middle Wallop, flown by Flying Officer John Dundas, lies in wait for enemy aircraft (Junkers 87 divebombers) on their way to attack British naval installations at ......NOT
AVAILABLE
The Hawker Hurricane was Britains most important aircraft in the Battle of Britain, credited with destroying more enemy aircraft than all other forms of defence combined. Flown by Flying Officer Arthur Cowes, the aircraft depicted shows seven kill ma......Hawker Hurricane Mk I by Philip West.
Price : £60.00
The Hawker Hurricane was Britains most important aircraft in the Battle of Britain, credited with destroying more enemy aircraft than all other forms of defence combined. Flown by Flying Officer Arthur Cowes, the aircraft depicted shows seven kill ma......

Quantity:
 The Hawker Hurricane was Britains most important aircraft in the Battle of Britain, credited with destroying more enemy aircraft than all other forms of defence combined. Flown by Flying Officer Arthur Cowes, the aircraft depicted shows seven kill m......Hawker Hurricane Mk I by Philip West. (AP)
SOLD OUT
The Hawker Hurricane was Britains most important aircraft in the Battle of Britain, credited with destroying more enemy aircraft than all other forms of defence combined. Flown by Flying Officer Arthur Cowes, the aircraft depicted shows seven kill m......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Flt. Lt. Michael Penny

Flt. Lt. Michael Penny

Squadrons for : Flt. Lt. Michael Penny
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Flt. Lt. Michael Penny. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.153 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 4th November 1918
Fate : Disbanded 2nd July 1958

Noctividus - Seeing by night

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.153 Sqn RAF

No.153 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.602 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th September 1925
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
City of Glasgow (Auxiliary)

Cave leonem cruciatum - Beware the tormented lion

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.602 Sqn RAF

No.602 Sqn RAF

We have been informed by pilot Ian Blair about one of the aircraft of this squadron : The Spitfire MkVII had the Squadron markings of 312 Sqdn (DU-G) but the aircraft was on the strength of 602 Sqn. and was inherited by 602 Sqn from the Station Flight at Skae Bray, after 312 Sqn had left the area. The time span did not permit the ground personnel sufficient time to paint new letters on the aircraft. This fact has led to the incorrect assumption that I, the pilot of the aircraft, was a member of 312 Sqn.
Aircraft for : Flt. Lt. Michael Penny
A list of all aircraft associated with Flt. Lt. Michael Penny. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Defiant



Click the name above to see prints featuring Defiant aircraft.

Manufacturer : Boulton Paul
Production Began : 1939
Number Built : 1075

Defiant

BOULTON PAUL DEFIANT Built as a fighter, with a crew of two. Maximum speed of 304 mph, and a ceiling of 30,350 feet. armament on the defiant was four .303 browing machine guns in the Boulton Paul Turret. Designed as a intercepter fighter, the Defiant first flew in August 1937. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in October 1939 with no 264 squadron. and first flew in operations in march 1940 the Boulton Paul Defiant was certainly no match for the German Fighters, due to their lack of fire power as the defiant had no wing mounted machine guns. Heavy losses. The aircraft was re deployed as a night -Fighter in the autumn of 1940. This role also being taken over by Bristol Beaufighters in 1941, leaving the defiant for training, target tug, and air-sea rescue roles. A Total of 1075 Boulton Paul Defiant's were built

Hurricane



Click the name above to see prints featuring Hurricane aircraft.

Manufacturer : Hawker
Production Began : 1936
Number Built : 14533

Hurricane

Royal Air Force Fighter, the Hawker Hurricane had a top speed of 320mph, at 18,200 feet and 340mph at 17,500, ceiling of 34,200 and a range of 935 miles. The Hurricane was armed with eight fixed wing mounted .303 browning machine guns in the Mark I and twelve .303 browning's in the MKIIB in the Hurricane MKIIC it had four 20mm cannon. All time classic fighter the Hurricane was designed in 1933-1934, the first prototype flew in June 1936 and a contract for 600 for the Royal Air Force was placed. The first production model flew ion the 12th October 1937 and 111 squadron of the Royal Air Force received the first Hurricanes in January 1938. By the outbreak of World war two the Royal Air Force had 18 operational squadrons of Hurricanes. During the Battle of Britain a total of 1715 Hurricanes took part, (which was more than the rest of the aircraft of the Royal air force put together) and almost 75% of the Victories during the Battle of Britain went to hurricane pilots. The Hawker Hurricane was used in all theatres during World war two, and in many roles. in total 14,533 Hurricanes were built.

Lysander

Click the name above to see prints featuring Lysander aircraft.

Manufacturer : Westland Aircraft
Production Began : 1938
Retired : 1946
Number Built : 1786

Lysander

The first Lysanders entered service in June 1938, equipping squadrons for army co-operation and were initially used for message-dropping and artillery spotting. When war broke out in Europe, the earlier Mk Is had been largely replaced by Mk IIs, the older machines heading for the Middle East. Some of these aircraft, now designated type L.1, operated with the Chindits of the British Indian Army in the Burma Campaign of the Second World War. Four regular squadrons equipped with Lysanders accompanied the British Expeditionary Force to France in October 1939, and were joined by a further squadron early in 1940. Following the German invasion of France and the low countries on 10 May 1940, the Lysanders were put into action as spotters and light bombers. In spite of occasional victories against German aircraft, they made very easy targets for the Luftwaffe even when escorted by Hurricanes. Withdrawn from France during the Dunkirk evacuation, they continued to fly supply-dropping missions to Allied forces from bases in England; on one mission to drop supplies to troops trapped at Calais, 14 of 16 Lysanders and Hawker Hectors that set out were lost. 118 Lysanders were lost in or over France and Belgium in May and June 1940, of a total of 175 deployed. With the fall of France, it was clear that the type was unsuitable for the coastal patrol and army co-operation role, being described by Air Marshal Arthur Barratt, commander-in-chief of the British Air Forces in France as "quite unsuited to the task; a faster, less vulnerable aircraft was required." Nevertheless, throughout the remainder of 1940, Lysanders flew dawn and dusk patrols off the coast and in the event of an invasion of Britain, they were tasked with attacking the landing beaches with light bombs and machine guns.[9] They were replaced in the home-based army co-operation role from 1941 by camera-equipped fighters such as the Curtiss Tomahawk and North American Mustang carrying out reconnaissance operations, while light aircraft such as the Taylorcraft Auster were used to direct artillery. Some UK-based Lysanders went to work operating air-sea rescue, dropping dinghies to downed RAF aircrew in the English Channel. Fourteen squadrons and flights were formed for this role in 1940 and 1941. In August 1941 a new squadron, No. 138 (Special Duties), was formed to undertake missions for the Special Operations Executive to maintain clandestine contact with the French Resistance. Among its aircraft were Lysander Mk IIIs, which flew over and landed in occupied France. While general supply drops could be left to the rest of No. 138's aircraft, the Lysander could insert and remove agents from the continent or retrieve Allied aircrew who had been shot down over occupied territory and had evaded capture. For this role the Mk IIIs were fitted with a fixed ladder over the port side to hasten access to the rear cockpit and a large drop tank under the belly. In order to slip in unobtrusively the Lysanders were painted matte black; operations almost always took place within a week of a full moon, as moonlight was essential for navigation. The aircraft undertook such duties until the liberation of France in 1944. The Lysanders flew from secret airfields at Newmarket and later Tempsford, but used regular RAF stations to fuel-up for the actual crossing, particularly RAF Tangmere. Flying without any navigation equipment other than a map and compass, Lysanders would land on short strips of land, such as fields, marked out by four or five torches. They were originally designed to carry one passenger in the rear cockpit, but for SOE use the rear cockpit was modified to carry two passengers in extreme discomfort in case of urgent necessity. The pilots of No. 138 and from early 1942, No. 161 Squadron transported 101 agents to and recovered 128 agents from Nazi-occupied Europe. The Germans knew little about the British aircraft and wished to study one. Soldiers captured an intact Lysander in March 1942 when its pilot was unable to destroy it after a crash, but a train hit the truck carrying the Lysander, destroying the cargo

Magister

Click the name above to see prints featuring Magister aircraft.


Magister

Full profile not yet available.

Master

Click the name above to see prints featuring Master aircraft.

Manufacturer : Miles

Master

Full profile not yet available.

Spitfire



Click the name above to see prints featuring Spitfire aircraft.

Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Spitfire

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 20th November
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page