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Hurricane

Royal Air Force Fighter, the Hawker Hurricane had a top speed of 320mph, at 18,200 feet and 340mph at 17,500, ceiling of 34,200 and a range of 935 miles. The Hurricane was armed with eight fixed wing mounted .303 browning machine guns in the Mark I and twelve .303 browning's in the MKIIB in the Hurricane MKIIC it had four 20mm cannon. All time classic fighter the Hurricane was designed in 1933-1934, the first prototype flew in June 1936 and a contract for 600 for the Royal Air Force was placed. The first production model flew ion the 12th October 1937 and 111 squadron of the Royal Air Force received the first Hurricanes in January 1938. By the outbreak of World war two the Royal Air Force had 18 operational squadrons of Hurricanes. During the Battle of Britain a total of 1715 Hurricanes took part, (which was more than the rest of the aircraft of the Royal air force put together) and almost 75% of the Victories during the Battle of Britain went to hurricane pilots. The Hawker Hurricane was used in all theatres during World war two, and in many roles. in total 14,533 Hurricanes were built.

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Hurricane Battle of Britain Aviation Art Prints, Paintings and Drawings
Aviation Art
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Ground Force by Ivan Berryman.


Ground Force by Ivan Berryman.

Routine, though essential, maintenance is carried out on a 501 Sqn Hurricane at the height of the Battle of Britain during the Summer of 1940. Hurricane P3059 SD-N in the background is the aircraft of Group Captain Byron Duckenfield.
Item Code : B0099Ground Force by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.
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PRESENTATIONFighter Pilots Presentation Edition of 5 Artist Proofs, supplied double matted.
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Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm) Brothers, Peter (matted)
Stanford-Tuck, Bob (matted)
Duckenfield, Byron (matted)
David, Dennis (matted)
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


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PRINTRAF signature edition of 100 prints (Nos 751 to 850) from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints.
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Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm) Millard, Jocelyn G P
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


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PRINTMorewood signature edition of 200 prints from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints.
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Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm) Morewood, Roger
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PRINTBattle of Britain signature edition of 300 prints from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints.
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Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm) Duckenfield, Byron
Wilkinson, Ken
Morewood, Roger
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


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PRINTWilkinson / Duckenfield signature edition of 300 prints from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints.
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Wilkinson, Ken
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POSTCARDCollector's Postcard - Restricted Initial Print Run of 100 cards.
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Tangmere Hurricanes by Nicolas Trudgian.


Tangmere Hurricanes by Nicolas Trudgian.

MK1 Hurricanes of No. 601 Squadron refueled and rearmed, climb to rejoin the battle during the summer of 1940. As the great air battle rages high above, life goes in the countryside as a Southern Railway train pulls out of a local village station, capturing the resilient mood of the people.
Item Code : DHM2679Tangmere Hurricanes by Nicolas Trudgian. - Editions Available
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 1000 prints.
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Paper size 33 inches x 24 inches (84cm x 61cm) Page, Geoffrey
Townsend, Peter
Beamont, Roland
Bird-Wilson, H
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Townsend, Peter
Beamont, Roland
Bird-Wilson, H
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PRINT Limited edition of publisher proofs.
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Paper size 33 inches x 24 inches (84cm x 61cm) Page, Geoffrey
Townsend, Peter
Beamont, Roland
Bird-Wilson, H
Jones, Richard L
Morgan, Tom Dalton
Snell, Vivian
Sizer, Wilfred M
Millard, Jocelyn G P
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Hurricane Country by Nicolas Trudgian.


Hurricane Country by Nicolas Trudgian.

Released on the 65th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain a new limited edition to commemorate Churchills famous few. Stalwart of the Battle of Britain, the Hawker Hurricane equipped the majority of the RAF squadrons that defended Britain during that epic and decisive air battle in the summer of 1940. At the forefront of the air fighting over the southern counties of England, the young Hurricane pilots of 501 Squadron covered themselves in glory. Nicolas Trudgians painting sets the scene: a victim of yesterdays aerial conflicts, a crashlanded German Ju88 of KG30 lies on the edge of a Sussex field; the attention of two members of the local Home Guard is drawn to the Hurricanes of 501 Squadron as the fighters race back at low-level to Gravesend for fuel and ammunition. Within minutes they will scramble aloft again to rejoin the fray.

Published 2005.
Item Code : DHM2586Hurricane Country by Nicolas Trudgian. - Editions Available
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PRINT Aces Edition : Signed limited edition of 100 prints.
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Print paper size 31 inches x 22.5 inches (79cm x 60cm) Lee, Kenneth
Mackenzie, Ken
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.
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Print paper size 31 inches x 23.5 inches (79cm x 60cm) Lee, Kenneth
Mackenzie, Ken
Snell, Vivian
Pickering, Tony
Parkin, Eric
Green, W J
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


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Print paper size 31 inches x 23.5 inches (79cm x 60cm) Pickering, Tony
Snell, Vivian
Green, W J
Parkin, Eric
Lee, Kenneth
Mackenzie, Ken
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


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PRINT Battle of Britain Proof Edition : Limited edition of 25 artist proofs.
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Print paper size 31 inches x 23.5 inches (79cm x 60cm) Pickering, Tony
Snell, Vivian
Green, W J
Parkin, Eric
Lee, Kenneth
Mackenzie, Ken
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


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Battle of Britain Proof Edition : Signed limited edition of 450 prints.
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Print paper size 31 inches x 23.5 inches (79cm x 60cm) Pickering, Tony
Snell, Vivian
Green, W J
Parkin, Eric
Lee, Kenneth
Mackenzie, Ken
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


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** (Ex Display) Aces Edition : Signed limited edition of 100 prints.
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Print paper size 31 inches x 22.5 inches (79cm x 60cm) Lee, Kenneth
Mackenzie, Ken
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Assault on the Capital by Robert Taylor


Assault on the Capital by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylors final painting in his 60th Anniversary trilogy features a scene from the attacks on the afternoon of September 7, 1940. Led by Herbert Ihlefeld, Me109Es of II/LG 2 dive through the bomber formation giving chase to Hurricanes of 242 Squadron as Ju88s of KG30, having unloaded their bombs, head for home. One Ju88 has been hit and is already losing height, and will not return. Following behind He111s of KG53 try to keep formation as they fly through flak. The sky is alive with action.
Item Code : DHM2121Assault on the Capital by Robert Taylor - Editions Available
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PRINT Millenium Edition of 250 prints.
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Paper size 33 inches x 24 inches (84cm x 61cm) Seeger, Gunther
Neumann, Eduard
Rossmann, Paule
Thomas, Herbert
Trenkel, Rudolf
Wehnelt, Herbert
Miese, Rudolf
Rall, Gunther
Dickfeld, Adolf
Lange, Heinz
Reinert, Ernst Wilhelm
Rudorffer, Erich
Bennemann, Helmut
Bethke, Siegfried
Bob, Hans-Ekkehard
Grislawski, Alfred
Kaiser, Herbert
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.
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Paper size 33 inches x 24 inches (84cm x 61cm) Rall, Gunther
Dickfeld, Adolf
Lange, Heinz
Reinert, Ernst Wilhelm
Rudorffer, Erich
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


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The Fly Past by Robin Smith.


The Fly Past by Robin Smith.

Hurricane MK1 of 85 Sqdn, Debden.
Item Code : RS0011The Fly Past by Robin Smith. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed edition.
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Image size 12 inches x 8.5 inches (31cm x 22cm)Artist : Robin Smith£40.00

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Bob Stanford-Tuck Tribute Folio by Nicolas Trudgian.


Bob Stanford-Tuck Tribute Folio by Nicolas Trudgian.

Bob Stanford-Tuck waits at dispersal in his 257 Squadron Hurricane during the Battle of Britain. Promoted to command 257 Squadron, Bob was one of the Battle of Britains leading Aces.
Item Code : DHM2049Bob Stanford-Tuck Tribute Folio by Nicolas Trudgian. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 250 mounted prints.
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Mounted size 19 inches x 16 inches (48cm x 41cm) Stanford-Tuck, Bob
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


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The Guardians by Philip West.


The Guardians by Philip West.

Legendary Hurricane pilot Flight Commander Pete Brothers (32 Sqn) and his wingman, having just taken off from Biggin Hill, proceed to gain height over the White Cliffs of Dover in search of the fighters and bombers of the Luftwaffe. By the end of the war Pete Brothers had amassed 875 operational hours over a 44-month period. He was credited with having personally shot down 16 enemy aircraft and damaged many more.
Item Code : DHM2333The Guardians by Philip West. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 100 prints.
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Paper size 26.5 inches x 16.5 inches (67cm x 42cm)Artist : Philip West£10 Off!
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Limited edition of 25 artist proofs.
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Paper size 26.5 inches x 16.5 inches (67cm x 42cm))cm) Brothers, Peter
+ Artist : Philip West


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A Pickle for Pickering by Brian Bateman. (P)


A Pickle for Pickering by Brian Bateman. (P)

September 11th 1940. The 501 Squadron Hurricane of Tony Pickering dives through a formation of 300 German bombers as they head for London. Smoke begins to pour from his Hurricane as a German gunner hits his oil sump, forcing Tony to make a hasty escape from the doomed aircraft.
Item Code : B0539A Pickle for Pickering by Brian Bateman. (P) - Editions Available
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DRAWING
Original drawing by Brian Bateman.
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Paper size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm) Duckenfield, Byron
+ Artist : Brian Bateman


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Undaunted by Odds by Robert Taylor.


Undaunted by Odds by Robert Taylor.

On 6th November 1935, a prototype aircraft took to the air for the very first time. As Sydney Camm's sturdy, single-engine monoplane fighter climbed into the sky, few realized that it was destined to become one of the enduring symbols of the greatest air battle ever fought. Its name was the Hawker Hurricane. Undaunted by Odds is a moving tribute to the Hurricane and the gallant pilots who flew it in combat. The painting portrays the Hurricanes of the 303 Polish Squadron RAF during the Battle of Britain as the unit climbs steadily to intercept yet another incoming wave of enemy bombers heading for London in September 1940. Soon the already battle-hardened Polish pilots will once again be in the thick of the action.
Item Code : DHM6057Undaunted by Odds by Robert Taylor. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 250 prints.
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Paper size 35 inches x 24 inches (89cm x 61cm) Image size 28 inches x 16 inches (71cm x 41cm) Mencel, Jurek
Nawarski, Stanislaw
Ryll, Stefan
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


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Hurricane Veterans edition of 25 artist proofs.
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Paper size 35 inches x 24 inches (89cm x 61cm) Image size 28 inches x 16 inches (71cm x 41cm) Mencel, Jurek
Nawarski, Stanislaw
Ryll, Stefan
Biggs, Jack
Byrne, John
Carter, Eric
Cockram, Ken
Joyce, Frank
Parry, Hugh
Taussig, Kurt
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


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PRINT Hurricane Veterans edition of 400 prints.
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Paper size 35 inches x 24 inches (89cm x 61cm) Image size 28 inches x 16 inches (71cm x 41cm) Mencel, Jurek
Nawarski, Stanislaw
Ryll, Stefan
Biggs, Jack
Byrne, John
Carter, Eric
Cockram, Ken
Joyce, Frank
Parry, Hugh
Taussig, Kurt
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


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PRINT Battle of Britain Tribute edition of 150 prints.
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Paper size 35 inches x 24 inches (89cm x 61cm) Image size 28 inches x 16 inches (71cm x 41cm) Mencel, Jurek
Nawarski, Stanislaw
Ryll, Stefan
Biggs, Jack
Byrne, John
Carter, Eric
Cockram, Ken
Joyce, Frank
Parry, Hugh
Taussig, Kurt
Ayerst, Peter V
Elkington, John (companion print)
Ellacombe, John (companion print)
Foster, Bob (companion print)
Neil, Tom (companion print)
Pickering, Tony (companion print)
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


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Hurricanes - 85 Squadron by Graeme Lothian. (P)


Hurricanes - 85 Squadron by Graeme Lothian. (P)

Hawker Hurricanes of No.85 Sqn RAF take off to intercept another enemy raid during the Battle of Britain.
Item Code : B0383Hurricanes - 85 Squadron by Graeme Lothian. (P) - Editions Available
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ORIGINAL
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Original pencil drawing by Graeme Lothian.
Full Item Details
Paper size 24 inches x 21 inches (61cm x 53cm) Area shown is not full paper size - please see product page for full paper size image. Thom, Alex
Tappin, H E
+ Artist : Graeme Lothian


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Hurricane Attack by Robert Taylor. (GS)


Hurricane Attack by Robert Taylor. (GS)

Few flew the Hurricane better in combat than Squadron Leader John Grandy, Commanding Officer of 249 Squadron. Robert Taylor's iconic painting Hurricane Attack portrays him about to pounce on a Bf110 over the Isle of Wight in August 1940.
Item Code : DHM6480Hurricane Attack by Robert Taylor. (GS) - Editions Available
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Studio Proof Edition of 75 giclee canvas prints.
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Size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)Artist : Robert Taylor£395.00

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Standing Guard by Graeme Lothian. (P)


Standing Guard by Graeme Lothian. (P)

A soldier of the Home Guard watches over a downed Me109 fighter as a squadron of RAF Hurricanes fly overhead. More Hawker Hurricanes flew during the Battle of Britain than Spitfires, guarding Britain against the might of the Luftwaffe.
Item Code : B0384Standing Guard by Graeme Lothian. (P) - Editions Available
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ORIGINAL
DRAWING
Original pencil drawing by Graeme Lothian.
Full Item Details
Paper size 24 inches x 21 inches (61cm x 53cm) Area shown is not full paper size - please see product page for full paper size image. Thom, Alex
Tappin, H E
+ Artist : Graeme Lothian


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We All Stand Together by Robert Taylor.


We All Stand Together by Robert Taylor.

Spitfires of 616 Squadron scramble from RAF Kenley during the heavy fighting of the Battle of Britain, late August 1940. Below them a Hurricane of 253 Squadron, sharing the same base, is being prepared for its next vital mission at a distant dispersal. All through the long summer of 1940, as Britain stood alone, a small band of fighter pilots took part in the greatest aerial battle in history. Day after day the men of Fighter Command valiantly took to the air to defend their country from the Luftwaffe and the threat of German invasion and Nazi tyranny. Outnumbered, but never out-fought, they fought to the point of exhaustion and, in doing so, paid a heavy price. But they won.
Item Code : DHM6486We All Stand Together by Robert Taylor. - Editions Available
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 100 prints.
Full Item Details
Paper size 20 inches x 11.5 inches (51cm x 30cm) Kane, Terence
Hughes, William Robert Bob
Pickering, Tony
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £95
£125.00

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PRINTBattle of Britain edition of 50 prints.
Full Item Details
Great value : Value of signatures exceeds price of item!
Paper size 20 inches x 11.5 inches (51cm x 30cm) Kane, Terence
Hughes, William Robert Bob
Pickering, Tony
Clark, Terry
Elkington, John
Jonathan, Bill
Neil, Tom
Wellum, Geoffrey
Summers, Richard G B
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £285
£210.00

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Hawker Hurricane Mk I L1856 of 1 Sqn RAF by Keith Woodcock.


Hawker Hurricane Mk I L1856 of 1 Sqn RAF by Keith Woodcock.

Item Code : WC0007Hawker Hurricane Mk I L1856 of 1 Sqn RAF by Keith Woodcock. - Editions Available
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PRINT Open edition print.
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Image size 11 inches x 7 inches (28cm x 18cm)none£9.00

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Hurricane of No.501 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.


Hurricane of No.501 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.

No.501 Sqn Hurricane Mk.I of Squadron Leader Harry -Hulk- Hogan, during the Battle of Britain. This aircraft carried the codes SD-A.
Item Code : IBF0008Hurricane of No.501 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm) Thom, Alex
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


Signature(s) value alone : £50
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Limited edition of 20 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm) Thom, Alex
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


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Small limited edition of 15 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£5 Off!
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PRINTSmall limited edition of 35 prints.
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Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£10 Off!
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Now : £48.00

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Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Size 30 inches x 20inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
(on separate certificate)
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Guardian Angel by Gerald Coulson.


Guardian Angel by Gerald Coulson.

As Britain holds itself ready for perhaps the greatest battle it has ever fought, a pair of Mk 1 Hurricanes of 213 Squadron set out from their base at Biggin Hill for an early morning patrol over the Channel, they could meet the enemy at any moment. As they cross the coast, they are joined in spirit by a 213 Squadron Sopwith Camel from an earlier conflict. With the Battle of Britain poised to begin the great task of defending the nation will fall upon their shoulders. But at least for today the spirit of their guardian angel will be at their side.
Item Code : DHM1864Guardian Angel by Gerald Coulson. - Editions Available
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PRINTLimited edition of 300 prints
Full Item Details
Paper size 29.5 inches x 23 inches (75cm x 58cm)Artist : Gerald CoulsonSOLD
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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Paper size 29.5 inches x 23 inches (75cm x 58cm) Drake, Billy
Duckenfield, Byron
Elkington, John
+ Artist : Gerald Coulson


Signature(s) value alone : £135
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REMARQUELimited edition of 10 remarques
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Duckenfield, Byron
Elkington, John
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Vital Force by Richard Taylor.


Vital Force by Richard Taylor.

For perhaps the sixth time today, profoundly outnumbered, the RAFs young fighter pilots will intercept yet another Luftwaffe force as the evil raiders invade their beloved airspace. It is August 1940, and the Battle of Britain is raging towards its ferocious climax over southern England. The sturdy Hawker Hurricane MkIs, bearing the brunt of all the combat flying during the Battle, will account for no fewer than four fifths of the air victories achieved by RAF fighter pilots. The simplicity of its construction enabled the Hurricane to survive heavy punishment in combat, at the same time providing its pilots with a reliable and stable gun platform. Beautiful, distinctive, tough and aggressive, this remarkable fighter, together with its courageous young pilots, earned the undying gratitude of a nation on the verge of defeat and ultimately, an unrivalled position in the annals of air warfare.
Item Code : DHM2712Vital Force by Richard Taylor. - Editions Available
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Paper size 34.5 inches x 23 inches (88cm x 58cm) Image size 28 inches x 15.5 inches (71cm x 40cm) Hairs, Peter
Green, Bill
Duckenfield, Byron
+ Artist : Richard Taylor


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Limited edition of 25 artist proofs.
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Paper size 34.5 inches x 23 inches (88cm x 58cm) Image size 28 inches x 15.5 inches (71cm x 40cm) Doe, Bob
Pickering, Tony
Elkington, John
Hairs, Peter
Green, Bill
Duckenfield, Byron
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PRINT Limited edition of 25 remarques.
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Paper size 34.5 inches x 23 inches (88cm x 58cm) Image size 28 inches x 15.5 inches (71cm x 40cm) Doe, Bob
Pickering, Tony
Elkington, John
Hairs, Peter
Green, Bill
Duckenfield, Byron
+ Artist : Richard Taylor


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PRINT Limited edition of 10 double remarques.
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Paper size 34.5 inches x 23 inches (88cm x 58cm) Image size 28 inches x 15.5 inches (71cm x 40cm) Doe, Bob
Pickering, Tony
Elkington, John
Hairs, Peter
Green, Bill
Duckenfield, Byron
+ Artist : Richard Taylor


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Hurricane Patrol by Graeme Lothian (GS)
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Salute the Few by Anthony Saunders. (APB)


Salute the Few by Anthony Saunders. (APB)

A poignant scene from the Battle of Britain, as a pair of battle weary Hurricanes return from a mission, young children play in the afternoon sun.
Item Code : AS0005Salute the Few by Anthony Saunders. (APB) - Editions Available
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Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm) Pickering, Tony
Duckenfield, Byron
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Hawker Hurricane Mk I by Philip West.


Hawker Hurricane Mk I by Philip West.

The Hawker Hurricane was Britains most important aircraft in the Battle of Britain, credited with destroying more enemy aircraft than all other forms of defence combined. Flown by Flying Officer Arthur Cowes, the aircraft depicted shows seven kill markings displayed as stripes on the Hornet motif.
Item Code : DHM2312Hawker Hurricane Mk I by Philip West. - Editions Available
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 300 prints.
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Paper size 18 inches x 12 inches (46cm x 31cm) Penny, Michael
May, Peter
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Penny, Michael
May, Peter
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Steinhoff Tribute by Robert Taylor.


Steinhoff Tribute by Robert Taylor.

Macky Steinhoff in action over the White Cliffs of Dover. It is August, and the height of the Battle of Britain: Heinkel 111 bombers have attacked airfields and radar stations along the south coast, and a frantic dog-fight has developed as Me109s of JG-52 clash with Hurricanes of the RAFs No. 32 Squadron. Mackys Me109E, which dominates the picture, provides a magnificently detailed study of this superlative fighter, as he and his fellow Luftwaffe pilots do their best to protect the retreating Heinkels. Below is a wonderful panoramic aerial view of Dover Harbour, the legendary White Cliffs, and the carefully researched landscape showing the south-eastern tip of the British Isles as it was in 1940.
Item Code : DHM2172Steinhoff Tribute by Robert Taylor. - Editions Available
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 1250 prints.
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Paper size 33 inches x 25 inches (84cm x 64cm) Steinhoff, Johannes
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


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Paper size 33 inches x 25 inches (84cm x 64cm) Steinhoff, Johannes
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Paper size 33 inches x 25 inches (84cm x 64cm) Steinhoff, Johannes
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Top Aces for : Hurricane
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
John Randall Daniel Bob Braham29.00
Robert Stanford-Tuck29.00The signature of Robert Stanford-Tuck features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Frank R Carey28.00The signature of Frank R Carey features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
James Harry Ginger Lacey28.00The signature of James Harry Ginger Lacey features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Billy Drake24.50The signature of Billy Drake features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Geoffrey Allard23.80
William Vale22.00
Archibald Ashmore Archie McKellar21.00
F W Higginson15.00The signature of F W Higginson features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Peter Malam Brothers15.00The signature of Peter Malam Brothers features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Robert Francis Thomas Doe15.00The signature of Robert Francis Thomas Doe features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Tom Neil14.00The signature of Tom Neil features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Manfred Beckett Czernin13.00
Alan Geoffrey Page12.50The signature of Alan Geoffrey Page features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Joseph Risso11.00The signature of Joseph Risso features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
George H Westlake11.00The signature of George H Westlake features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Ken Mackenzie8.00The signature of Ken Mackenzie features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Paul Farnes8.00The signature of Paul Farnes features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Charles Palliser7.50The signature of Charles Palliser features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
James Douglas Lindsay7.00The signature of James Douglas Lindsay features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Kenneth Lee7.00The signature of Kenneth Lee features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Bob Foster7.00The signature of Bob Foster features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Wilf Sizer7.00The signature of Wilf Sizer features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Owen Vincent Tracey6.00
Keith Ashley Lawrence5.00The signature of Keith Ashley Lawrence features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
John Harry Stafford5.00The signature of John Harry Stafford features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Signatures for : Hurricane
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Captain Luke Allen
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Captain Luke Allen

Volunteering for the RAF just as the Battle of Britain was reaching its climax, Luke joined 71 Eagle Squadron, flying his first combat operation in April 1941 on Hurricanes. Converting to Spitfires the squadron had a busy period of patrols, sweeps and escorts before transferring to the USAAF as the 334th Fighter Squadron. Luke flew over 60 combat missions in Europe.




Flying Officer (Acting Flt/Lt) Bill Anderson
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Flying Officer (Acting Flt/Lt) Bill Anderson

Flying Officer (Acting Flt/Lt) Bill Anderson flew with 16 Sqn from 1943 until the war was over. He trained in Georgia, USA, before becoming attached to 16 Sqn at Benson, flying missions over France and Germany. Bill flew many different types of aircraft beginning with a PT17 Stearman in the USA; others include Tiger Moths, Typhoons, Tempest, Harvards, Lysanders, Hurricanes and Oxfords.




Flight Lieutenant Alexander N R L Appleford
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17 / 4 / 2012Died : 17 / 4 / 2012
Flight Lieutenant Alexander N R L Appleford

Born in September 1921, Robin Appleford was one of the youngest pilots to take part in the Battle of Britain. He joined 66 Squadron at Duxford on 13th May 1940, flying Spitfires. He was shot down over the Thames Estuary during a dogfight on 4th September 1940, but baled out slightly wounded. After a spell as an instructor, in 1943 he flew another combat tour, this time with 274 Squadron, flying Hurricanes on coastal defence in North Africa. After a spell with the Aircraft Delivery Unit, he went to South Africa as a flying instructor. Sadly, we have learned that Alexander Appleford passed away on 17th April 2012.




Wing Commander Peter V Ayerst DFC
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Wing Commander Peter V Ayerst DFC

Peter Ayerst joined the RAF in 1938, and was posted to 73 Squadron in August 1939, flying Hurricanes. He went to France with the squadron, scoring his first victory in April 1940. After a spell instructing, when he shared in the destruction of a He111 with two other instructors, he had postings with both 145 and 243 Squadrons. In July 1942 he went to 33 Squadron, before promotion to flight commander with 238 Squadron, both postings with further combat success. After a period in South Africa, he returned to the UK, joining 124 Squadron flying Spitfire MkVIIs in defence of the invasion ports, where he scored his final victory; then flew Spitfire MkIXs on bomber escorts to Germany. He later became a Spitfire test pilot at Castle Bromwich. Peter finished the war not only a brilliant fighter Ace, but also one of the most highly regarded wartime instructors in the RAF. His final victory tally stood at 5 destroyed, 1 probable, 3 damaged and 2 further destroyed on the ground.




Squadron Leader Cyril Bam Bamberger
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Squadron Leader Cyril Bam Bamberger

3 / 2 / 2008Died : 3 / 2 / 2008
Squadron Leader Cyril Bam Bamberger

Born in Port Sunlight on May 4th 1919, Cyril Bamberger won an electrical engineering apprenticeship at Lever Brothers in 1934. He joined 610 Squadron AuxAF, in 1936 on the ground staff. Accepted for pilot training with the RAF VR in late 1938, he soloed in mid 1939. Bamberger was called up at the outbreak of war and on the 23rd October 1939 was posted to No 8 EFTS, Woodley and later went to 9 FTS, Hullavington to complete his training. He rejoined 610 (F) Squadron at Biggin Hill on July 27th but with no experience on Spitfires, he was sent to Hawarden for three weeks. Back with 610 (F) Squadron, Bamberger claimed a probable Bf109 on August 28th 1940. He was posted to 41 (F) Squadron at Hornchurch, Essex, September 17th and on October 5th he claimed a Bf109 destroyed. After volunteering for Malta, Bamberger left 41 (F) Squadron in mid-October 1940. He sailed from Glasgow on the Aircraft Carrier HMS Argus. Luckily for him, he did not fly off for Malta with the twelve Hurricanes ad two navigating Skuas which did. Only five of the fourteen aircraft reached their destination. Bamberger eventually reached Malta on November 28th on the destroyer HMS Hotspur, and on arrival he joined 261 Squadron. On January 18th 1941 he destroyed a Junkers JU87 Stuka and another the following day. 261 Squadron was dispended on May 21st 1941. Bamberger moved on the 12th to the newly formed 185 (F) Squadron at Hal Far. He was posted back to England on June 12th and was sent to Central Gunnery School at Sutton Bridge. Commissioned in February 1942, he was posted to Northern Ireland as a Gunnery Officer with the Americans who were converting to Spitfires. In March 1943 Bamberger volunteered for North Africa where he joined 93 Squadron at Hal Far, Malta in May. On July 13th operating over Sicily, he shot down a Junkers JU87 Stuka. In August Bamberger joined 243 Squadron in Sicily as a Flight Commander. He was awarded the DFC (28.09.43). On October 16th Bamberger damaged a Bf109, his first success after 243 crossed into Italy. On May 25th 1944 he claimed a Bf109 destroyed and on June 15th a Macci 202 damaged. Bamberger came off operations in July for medical reasons returning to the UK. He was sent on an instructors course and in early 1945 was posted to the Gunnery School at Catfoss. Awarded a bar to his DFC (14.11.44). Bamberger received it from the King at Buckingham Palace on July 3rd 1945. Released in 1946, Bamberger returned to Lever Brothers and rejoined 610 Squadron at Hooten Park, becoming its CO in 1950. When the Korean crisis came, he was recalled to the RAF. In February 1951 he was granted a permanent commission and in May 1952 moved to an Intelligence Unit, assessing strike capabilities of the Chinese and Koreans. Bamberger retired on January 29th 1959 as a Squadron Leader, and became managing director of a small packaging materials company – he started in 1954. On retirement he had an antique shop in Hampshire. Sadly, Cyril Bamberger passed away on 3rd February 2008.




Wing Commander Roland Bee Beamont CBE DSO DFC DL
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19 / 11 / 2001Died : 19 / 11 / 2001
Wing Commander Roland Bee Beamont CBE DSO DFC DL

One of World War IIs great characters, Bee flew Hurricanes with 87 Squadron, later leading a Tempest Wing. He had 8 victories plus a further 32 VIs destroyed. After the war he became a highly respected Chief Test Pilot.Wing Commander Roland Beamont, one of the RAFs top buzz bomb interceptors, was born in Enfield England on August 10, 1920. Educated at Eastborne College, Beamont accepted a short service commission with the Royal Air Force in 1938. He commenced flying in 1939 at the the No. 13 Reserve Flying School at White Waltham. His initial duty was with the Group Fighter Pool at St. Athan where he learned to fly the Hurricane. Beamont was soon posted with the No. 87 Squadron which was part of the Advanced Air Striking Force in France. Seeing action in both France and Belgium prior to the Allied withdrawl, Beamont rejoined 87 Squadron in England during the Battle of Britain. In the spring of 1941 Beamont was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross after destroying five enemy aircraft. As Commanding Officer of 609 Squadron, Beamont pioneered both day and night ground attack missions utilizing the Typhoon. Beamont was credited with destroying 25 trains in a three month period. He was then made responsible for organizing and commanding the first Tempest Wing at Newchurch. Three days after D-Day Bearnont shot down an Me-109, marking the first aerial combat victory for the Hawker Tempest. In the summer of 1944 Beamont destroyed 32 buzz bombs prior to leading his wing to a Dutch Airfield at Volkel on the Continent. In October of 1944 Beamont was shot down during a ground attack mission over Germany, and he remained a prisoner of war until wars end. Following repatriation Beamont became an experimental test pilot with the Gloster Aircraft Company, which had developed the RAFs first jet aircraft. Turning down a permanent commission with the RAF, Beamont then joined English Electric Company in Wharton as the Chief Test Pilot for the B3/45 (Canberra) jet bomber program. He managed all prototype testing on the Canberra, and in the process set two Atlantic speed records. Later Beamont was involved with the supersonic P1/Lightning program, and became the first British pilot to fly at twice the speed of sound. From 1965 until 1970 he was a founding member of Britains highly succesful Saudi Arabian export program. For several years prior to his retirement in 1979, Beamont was Director of Operations for British Aerospace and Panavia where he was in charge of flight testing for the Tornado. Since his retirement Beamont has authored nine books, and published numerous magazine articles. He is a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Scociety and an Honorary Fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots in America. He died 19th November 2001.



Bee Beamont in the cockpit.



Flight Lieutenant Jack Biggs
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Flight Lieutenant Jack Biggs

Serving with 17 Sqn on Hurricanes he then transferred to Spitfires flying on the Burma front from March 1944 until the end of September 1945 as air cover for the planned invasion on Malaya which, as a result of the Nuclear attacks on the Japanese Empire, never happened.




Air Commodore Peter Brothers CBE, DSO, DFC*
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18 / 12 / 2008Died : 18 / 12 / 2008
18 / 12 / 2008Ace : 15.00 Victories
Air Commodore Peter Brothers CBE, DSO, DFC*

Learnt to fly at the age of 16 and joined the RAF two years later in 1936. He first saw action in 1940 when as a Flight Commander in 32 Squadron, based at Biggin Hill, he flew his Hurricane against the fighters and bombers of the Luftwaffe. He recalls this as an intensely busy period, during which he shot down an Me109 - his first enemy aircraft; by the end of August that same year his tally of enemy aircraft shot down increased to eight. Awarded the DFC, he was transferred to 257 Squadron where he joined Bob-Stanford Tuck as a Flight Commander. Promoted in 1941 to Squadron Leader, Pete Brothers then took command of 457 Squadron RAAF, equipped with Spitfires. A year later when 457 Squadron returned to Australia, Pete took command of 602 Squadron. In the early autumn of 1942 he went on to become Wing Leader of the Tangmere Wing, succeeding his old friend, Douglas Bader. By the end of the war Pete Brothers had amassed 875 operational hours over a 44-month period. He was credited with having personally shot down 16 enemy aircraft and damaged many more. He later went on to command 57 Squadron during the Malaya campaign. Upon return to the UK Pete Brothers joined the V-Force, flying Valiant-4 jet bombers. He retired in 1973. Sadly, Pete Brothers died 18th December 2008.

Peter Brothers signing the print - Combat Over Normandy - by Graeme Lothian

Peter Brothers signing the print - Fighting Lady - by Graeme Lothian



Air Commodore Cyril Brown CBE AFC AE
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1 / 11 / 2003Died : 1 / 11 / 2003
Air Commodore Cyril Brown CBE AFC AE

Born 17th January 1921. Joined the RAFVR in 1939, and completed pilot training to fly Hurricanes with No.245 Sqn during the Battle of Britain. He then joined No.616 Sqn in 1941, before taking a post as a test pilot. He died 1st November 2003.



Flying Officer John Byrne
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Flying Officer John Byrne

With the RAF since 1938, Byrne flew Hurricanes, Spitfires, P-47s, Tempests and Typhoons during WWII. Upon joining 197 Sqn in March 1944 he flew Typhoons during one the squadrons most hectic periods in the run up to D-Day and throughout the subsequent Allied invasion, mostly on low-level bombing missions. In total Byrne completed over 150 combat operations and finally left the RAF in 1946.




Group Captain Frank Carey
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6 / 12 / 2004Died : 6 / 12 / 2004
6 / 12 / 2004Ace : 28.00 Victories
Group Captain Frank Carey

Born 7th May 1912. Frank Carey joined the Royal Air Force n 1927 as a 15 year old apprentice. Carey was first employed as a ground crew fitter and metal rigger but in 1935 Frank carey was selected in 1935 for a pilots course. He was then posted as a sergeant pilot to No 43 Squadron, the Fighting Cocks, whose aircraft he had been servicing. Demonstrating exceptional panache in the Hawker Fury biplane fighter, Carey was selected for the squadrons renowned aerobatics team which took part in many air displays. In early 1939, No 43 Squadron was re-equipped at Tangmere, Sussex, with the eight-gun Hurricane fighter. During World War Two, Frank Carey scored 25 enemy aircraft destroyed, one of the highest Allied fighter pilot totals. Carey opened his account at Acklington in Northumberland, when he shared in the destruction of several Heinkel shipping raiders during the cold winter of 1939-40. This was followed by a short spell at Wick defending the fleet at Scapa Flow before he was commissioned as a pilot officer and posted with No 3 Hurricane Squadron to Merville in France after the German invasion, adding to his total. After six days day of continuous combat, during which he bagged some 14 kills Carey was shot down. He had attacked a Dornier 17 bomber and was following it closely down in its last moments; the pilot was dead but the surviving rear gunner pressed his trigger to set Careys Hurricane alight, wounding him in a leg. The fire stopped, and Carey lwas forced to land between the Allied and enemy lines. Carey managed to get back by hitching a lift with a Belgium soldier on the back of his motorbike until he was picked up by a Passing Army truck which got him to a casualty station at Dieppe, he was put on a Hospital train but the train was attacked by the luftwaffe afer the attack the Engin eDriver had detache dthe train form the carriages and left the wounded. The wlaking wounded managed to push the carriages to the relative safety of La Baule on the coast. Frank Carey along with some other RAF personel managed to obtain a abandoned Bristol Bombay whihc they flew back to Hendon with Carey manning the rear gun. Carey found himself listed as missing believed killed and awarded a DFC and Bar to add to an earlier DFM. He returned to Tangmere just in time for the Battle of Britain. During the Battle of Britain, Carey was shot down during an attack on a large formation of German aircraft, when after several ships had been lost from a Channel convoy during the summer of 1940 Carey and five other Hurricane pilots of No 43 Squadron arrived on the scene to find enemy aircraft stretched out in great lumps all the way from the Isle of Wight to Cherbourg. Frank Carey said about the combat At the bottom were Ju87 dive-bombers; above these Me 109s in great oval sweeps, and above them Me 110s. Three of us got up into them. It was absolutely ludicrous - three of us to take on that mob. At one stage I found himself hooked on to the tail of the last of an echelon of 109s and started firing away quite merrily. Then I had an awful wallop. It was an Me 110 with four cannons sitting just behind me. There was a big bang and there, in the wing, was a hole a man could have crawled through. Carey was slightly wounded by an explosive bullet, then a second Me 110 attacked and caused damage to Carey's rudder; but he managed to return to Tangmere only to be fired at by its anti-aircraft guns. That he managed to land was, he said, a great tribute to the Hurricane. He had been in combat up to six times a day when on August 18, the squadron's losses enabled him to lead No 43 for the first time in an attack on a mixed bunch of fighters and Ju 87 dive-bombers. The fur was flying everywhere, he recalled. Suddenly I was bullet stitched right across the cockpit. Since Tangmere was under attack he turned away and found a likely field for a crash landing at Pulborough, Sussex, where his Hurricane turned violently upside down. he spent some time in hospital. In November 1941 he was posted to Burma with No.135 Sqn when war broke out in the Far East. No 135 was diverted to Rangoon in Burma , , On February 27 1942, Carey was promoted wing commander to lead No 267 Wing, though it could seldom muster more than six serviceable Hurricanes. After destroying several Japanese aircraft he was forced to move to Magwe. As Japanese air raids increased Carey turned the Red Road, the main thoroughfare across the city, into a fighter runway. One advantage, he recalled, was that it was quite possible to sit in Firpos, the citys fashionable restaurant, and take off within three to four minutes. I managed it on several occasions. Early in 1943, Carey formed an air fighting training unit at Orissa, south-west of Calcutta, for pilots who were unfamiliar with conditions and Japanese tactics. In November 1944 he was posted to command No 73 OTU at Fayid, Egypt, in the rank of group captain. Awarded the AFC, Carey returned to Britian as the war ended in 1945, where he was granted a permanent commission and went to teach tactics at the Central Fighter Establishment at Tangmere. After attending the Army Staff College he reverted to the rank of wing commander to lead No 135 Wing, 2nd Tactical Air Force in Germany, where he flew Tempests. Converting to jets, he moved to Gutersloh as wing commander, A succession of staff appointments followed until 1958 he was appointed air adviser to the British High Commission in Australia. Carey, who was awarded the US Silver Star and appointed CBE in 1960, retired from the Royal Air Force in 1962 and joined Rolls-Royce as its aero division representative in Australia, New Zealand and Fiji, retiring in 1972 and moving back the the UK. . Frank Carey died 6th December 2004.

Frank Carey with the original painting - Fighter General - by Graeme Lothian.



Warrant Officer Eric Carter
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Warrant Officer Eric Carter

Initially posted to 615 Squadron flying Hurricanes, Eric was then posted to 81 Squadron, again on Hurricanes. In the autumn of 1941 he accompanied the squadron on HMS Argus to Russia as part of Force Benedict, a clandestine operation to defend the strategically important Russian port of Murmansk. As well as operational patrols the squadron escorted Russian bomber missions.




Squadron Leader A M Charlesworth DFC
Click the name above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader A M Charlesworth DFC
Squadron Leader A M Charlesworth DFC

Joined the RAF straight from school just before his 18th birthday in the summer of 1940 with the sole purpose of becoming a fighter pilot. After training, at age just 18, he was posted to RAF Ibsley, Hampshire, to 118 Sqdn, flying Spitfire 2Bs. Here he took part in his first scramble. After a month he was posted where the action was thickest, to a 11 Group Station, RAF Kenley, where he joined 602 Sqdn. His Squadron Commander was Al Deere, by this time a highly decorated ace; Al was 23 then and had already been shot down nine times. 602 Squadron was equipped with the more advanced Spitfire VBs which had two 20mm cannons, firing at 1200 rounds a minute, plus four very useful Browning 50mm machine guns firing at an even higher rate per minute. Al Deere was eventually posted to another squadron and Paddy Finucane took over - possibly the finest fighter pilot 1 came across, Max. Charlesworth continues, I remember him trying to get his 21st victory before his birthday and I often flew No. 2 to him. These were twitchy and tiring days when three sweeps a over occupied France day were the norm, to be met each time by several hundred Me 109s and Focke Wolf 190s, at our maximum range, where hectic dog fights ensued. We were normally outnumbered and a day could last from an early morning call at 3.30am to the last landing at 10.30pm in the semi-dark of the long summer of 1941. The average age of the approximately 30 pilots on the squadron was always about 19. During this period they were scrambled to search for and attack the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau (although they did not know it at the time) which, with escorting vessels had slipped up the Channel from Brest. The weather was awful and Max flew straight across the German battle cruiser Hipper thinking it was a Royal Navy cruiser. The Hipper opened up at Max with guns blazing but he was fortunate to escape with just a hole in one wing. In April 1942 Max was posted to a secret unit called MSFU (Merchant Service Fighter Unit) where he flew Hurricanes from catapults on merchant ships attached to convoys of anything up to fifty merchant men a time. The ships were mainly bringing supplies from America and taking them to Murmansk and Archangel, the hard-pressed Soviets and Gibraltar. Max recalls this as a highly physical and uncomfortable task, apart from also being very scary. The ships were constantly attacked by U Boat packs and aircraft. When they were in range of the latter, if they launched the Hurricane they knew they would ultimately have to bail out and hope to be picked up by either a friendly escort vessel or a sunken ships lifeboat. The North Atlantic route to Canada, north of Iceland and down the Greenland coast at an average sped of six knots in appalling seas was not our idea of a holiday cruise, Max vividly recalls. Having survived this posting Max was then moved to 124 Sq. at West Malting, Near Maidstone, Kent. The squadron was equipped with the much more powerful Spitfire IXs. Their task here was mainly escorting USAF and RAF bombing raids into Europe. With longrange tanks fitted they were able to reach Hamburg and Ludwigshafen; later on they were able to refuel from liberated bases in France. These ops. required them to fly as Top Cover at over 30,000 feet for up to three hours, where it was so cold the pilots returned to base hardly able to climb out of their cockpits. On February 9th 1945 Max was the Senior Flight Commander on 124 Squadron during their move to Cottishall. Here they adapted the Spitfire Ks to dive-bombing. The Spitfires carried either a 500lb. bomb under the fuselage and two 250lbs. under each wing or, a 90-gallon fuel tank under the fuselage and a 250lb. bomb under each wing. Their mission was to destroy V2 sites in Holland - mainly situated in small parks near the centre of the Hague. These V2 sites were launching rockets on London in ever increasing numbers. As well as attacking the V2 sites they were to destroy railway lines used by the Germans to transport V2s into the area. These were dangerous times as the V2s sites were heavily defended by 88mm guns down to 20mm. The flak was horrendous and we lost many recalls Max. As Senior Flight Commander, Max often led the squadron, though identifying targets from 12,000 feet was difficult. After the war Max was one of the first pilots to convert to the Meteor twin-engined jet, later to move on to Vampires and Canberras. His flying career was completed in June 1961 when he was posted to Warsaw, Poland as the Assistant Air Attache. He finally retired from the RAF in 1966.




Squadron Leader Douglas G Clift
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31 / 12 / 2008Died : 31 / 12 / 2008
Squadron Leader Douglas G Clift

Squadron Leader Douglas G Clift was born in 1919 and joined the RAF in January 1939. Douglas Clift arrived at 11 Group Pool, St Athan on 24 October 1939 and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 79 Squadron at Biggin Hill on November 17. On 15 August 1940 Clift claimed a Bf 110 destroyed and on 30 August he shared in the destruction of a He 111. In July 1941 he was posted to the Central Flying School at Upavon for an instructor's course. Clift later volunteered for the Merchant Ship Fighter Unit (MSFU) and served with it until October 1942. He remained on flying duties for the rest of the war, finishing up in South-East Asia with the Royal Indian Air Force (RIAF). After the war Clift served with 34 Squadron flying photo-reconnaissance Spitfires until its disbandment in August 1947. later he became a radar specialist, sadly Squadron Leader Douglas G Clift passed away on the 31st December 2008 aged 89.



Flying Officer Ken Cockram
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Flying Officer Ken Cockram

After training in Rhodesia and a spell with 73 OTU in Egypt, Ken Cockram flew Hurricanes and Spitfires in late 1944 and early 1945 with 26 AA Cooperation Unit based in Egypt. He also flew Curtiss Kittyhawks with 112 Squadron on anti-shipping and fighter patrols, once crashing his aircraft on take-off during a dust storm. He completed a total of 198 operations.



Flight Lieutenant Bryan Colston
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Flight Lieutenant Bryan Colston

Bryan Colston was born in Buckinghamshire on 27 May 1921 and was educated at St Pauls School. He joined the RAFVR in 1940, training on Tiger Moths, Oxfords and Lysanders, becoming a fighter reconnaissance pilot with 225 Squadron in 1941. He served with 225 Sqn until July 1943 and became a Flight Commander in 1942. He flew Lysanders, Tomahawks, Hurricanes, Mustangs and Spitfires serving throughout the Tunisian campaign and flying over a hundred operational sorties. He contracted typhoid fever at the end of the campaign and was invalided back to the UK, where, after periods of instructing at 61 OTU and some staff appointments, he commanded 695 Squadron flying Spitfire XVIs.



Flight Lieutenant Michael E Croskell
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Flight Lieutenant Michael E Croskell

Joining the RAFVR in June 1938, Michael Croskell was called up in September 1939 at the outbreak of war. He was posted to join 213 Squadron at Wittering in December flying Hurricanes, and took part in the Battle of France and the operations over Dunkirk in May 1940, where he probably destroyed a Ju87. He flew with 213 Squadron throughout the Battle of Britain, scoring three further victories at the height of the battle in August 1940. Commissioned in 1942, his great fighter skills led to him spending six years as an instructor.



Air Cheif Marshal Sir Kenneth Cross KCB, CBE, DSO, DFC
Click the name above to see prints signed by Air Cheif Marshal Sir Kenneth Cross KCB, CBE, DSO, DFC

18 / 6 / 2003Died : 18 / 6 / 2003
Air Cheif Marshal Sir Kenneth Cross KCB, CBE, DSO, DFC

Born October 4th 1911, Kenneth Cross was commissioned in to the RAF in 1930, joining 25 Sqn in 1931. Kenneth Cross survived the sinking of the aircraft carrier HMS Glorious in June 1940, when his No.46 Sqn Hurricane was onboard. Sqn Ldr Kenneth Cross was one of only two pilots to survive the sinking of HMS Glorious. Squadron Leader Cross and Flight Lieutenant Jameson from 46 squadron managed to get aboard a Carley float with 61 seamen, but 25 of the latter died of exposure and exhaustion before the 38 survivors, the two RAF men amongst them, were finally picked up by a passing fishing vessel. He spent much of the war commading Hurricanes in Africa, involved in the Crusader offensive in 1941, returning home in early 1944, and working at the Air Ministry until 1945. He died on the 18th of June 2003.



Lieutenant Steve Crowe
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Lieutenant Steve Crowe

Steve Crowe flew Hurricanes with 257 Squadron RAF. and undertook his first combat operation in November 1941. Along with other Americans he was then posted to join 133 Eagle Squadron, flying Spitfires, transferring to the USAAF in September 1942 as the 336th Fighter Squadron. He flew over 70 combat missions in both the European and Mediterranean theatres of operations.



Flight Lieutenant W R Cundy DFC DFM MID
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Flight Lieutenant W R Cundy DFC DFM MID

Ron Cundy commenced flying with 135 Sqn before being posted to the Middle East with 260 Sqn flying Hurricanes and later Kittyhawks. Returning back to Australia he flew Spitfires in defence of Darwin with 452 Sqn RAAF. In North Africa he survived an encounter with Marseille, and ended the war with 5 confirmed victories.



Miss Lettice Curtis
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Miss Lettice Curtis

Joined the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in July 1940 having been taken on to ferry Tiger Moths. Although we were later allowed to ferry other training types such as Oxfords and Masters, it was not until the autumn of 1941 that women were allowed to fly operational aircraft types. I flew my first Hurricane in August 1941 and my first Spitfire a couple of weeks later. After a brief course on a Blenheim I was cleared to fly without any further training, twin-engine bombers up to the Wellington. In November 1943 I was sent on a Halifax course, which due to unserviceability and bad weather closed, restarting in February 1943 at Pocklington where I was cleared for ferrying Halifaxes. After that without further training, I ferried Lancasters and over 100 Stirlings. In November 1945 I ferried 14 Liberators.



Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFM
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFM
Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFM

Roy Daines joined the RAF as soon as he was able, and after completing his hurried training as a pilot, was posted to join 247 Squadron in the autumn of 1940. Here he flew Gladiators and Hurricanes on coastal patrols, 247 being the only squadron to fly Gladiators during the Battle of Britain, before converting to nightfighting Hurricanes. Later, in 1943, he flew Typhoons with 247 before being posted to join 65 Squadron flying Spitfires and Mustangs.

Roy Daines signing the print Victory Above Dover

Roy Daines signing the original pencil drawing A Dunkirk Encounter




Flt Lt Leonard Davies
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Flt Lt Leonard Davies

Joined 151 Squadron in July 1940 and was wounded in combat over the Thames estuary on August 18th of that year. He later flew Sunderlands in the Middle East.




Wing Commander Bob Doe, DSO, DFC*
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Bob Doe, DSO, DFC*

21 / 2 / 2010Died : 21 / 2 / 2010
21 / 2 / 2010Ace : 15.00 Victories
Wing Commander Bob Doe, DSO, DFC*

In 1939 he joined the R.A.F. and upon completion of his training was posted to 234 squadron. During the Battle of Britain he achieved great success. He was one of the very few pilots to successfully fly both Hurricanes and Spitfires and was one of the top scorers of the Battle with 14 and two shared victories. He was awarded the DFC in October and a BAR in November. He joined 66 squadron as a Flight Commander then moving to 130 squadron in August 1943 saw him in 613 squadron flying Mustangs. October 1943 he was posted out to the Far-East, forming 10 squadron, Indian Air Force, which he led on the Burma front. Awarded the DSO in 1945. He stayed on in the R.A.F. after the war, retirement in 1966 was followed by opening a Garage business which proved successful. Sadly, we have learned of the passing of Bob Doe on 21st February 2010.

Bob Doe signing the print - Fighting Lady - by Graeme Lothian.

Bob Doe with the original painting - Fighter Pilot of the RAF - by Graeme Lothian.

Bob Doe signing the print - Fighter Pilot of the RAF - by Graeme Lothian.




Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC*
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC*

28 / 8 / 2011Died : 28 / 8 / 2011
28 / 8 / 2011Ace : 24.50 Victories
Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC*

Joined the R.A.F. in 1936. His first posting was to 1 squadron flying Furies then Hurricanes and first saw action over France in the Spring of 1940 and was awarded his first DFC by the end of the year. As a Squadron Leader he was sent to West Africa to command 128 Squadron. 1942 saw his commanding 112 squadron in North Africa, in July saw an immediate BAR to his DFC and in December an immediate DSO. Posted to Malta as Wing Commander he won a US DFC in 1943. Back in the UK he now was flying Typhoons in the lead up to D-Day. With Pete Brothers he was sent to the States to attend the US Staff School at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he continued in the R.A.F. serving in Japan, Malaya, Singapore, Switzerland and his final posting as Group Captain RAF Chivenor, Devon. Retired in July 1963. Going to Portugal where he ran a Bar and Restaurant and dealing in Real Estate. In his flying career he accounted for more than 24 enemy aircraft. Sadly, Billy Drake passed away on 28th August 2011.

Billy Drake signing the print - Fighting Lady - by Graeme Lothian.




Group Captain Byron Duckenfield AFC
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19 / 11 / 2010Died : 19 / 11 / 2010
Group Captain Byron Duckenfield AFC

Byron Duckenfield started at Flying Training School on 25th November 1935 in a Blackburn B2 at Brough. As a Sergeant, he joined No.32 Sqn at Biggin Hill on 8th August 1936 and flew Gauntlets and Hurricanes. He joined 74 Squadron at Hornchurch on 11th April 1940, flying Spitfires, and on 5th May was posted to 501 Squadron flying Hurricanes at Tangmere. On the 11th of May at Betheniville, he survived a crash in a passenger transport Bombay aircraft in an aircraft in which he was a passenger, While comin ginto land the aircraft at 200 feet the aircraft stalled and the aircrfat fell backwards just levelly out as it histhe ground. 5 of th epassengers were killed when the centre section collapsed and crushed them. Duckenfield was fortunate as he had moved position during the flight. as the two passengers sitting each side of where he was sitting had died in the crash. (it was found later that the Bombay had beeb loaded with to much weight in the aft sectiion. ) recovering in hospital in Roehampton. On 23rd July 1940, he rejoined No.501 Sqn at Middle Wallop, then moved to to Gravesend two days later, scoring his first victory, a Ju87, on the 29th of July 1940. During August and September he scored three more victories. After a spell as a test pilot from 14th September 1940, he was posted to command 66 Squadron on 20th December 1941, flying Spitfires. On 26th February 1942 he took command of 615 Squadron flying Hurricanes from Fairwood Common, taking the squadron to the Far East. In late December 1942 he was shot down in Burma and captured by the Japanese. He remained a POW until release in May 1945. After a refresher course at the Flying Training School in November 1949, he took command of No.19 Squadron flying Hornets and Meteors from Chruch Fenton. After a series of staff positions, he retired from the RAF as a Group Captain on 28th May 1969. Duckenfield would write later his details :

Burma

At first light, 12 Hurricanes IIC aircraft of 615 Squadron, myself in the lead, took off from Chittagong for central Burma to attack the Japanese air base at Magwe, 300 miles away on the banks of the River Irrawaddy. Arriving at Yenangyaung, we turned downstream at minimum height for Magwe, 30 miles to the South and jettisoned drop tanks. Just before sighting the enemy base, the squadron climbed to 1200 feet and positioned to attack from up sun. On the ramp at the base, in front of the hangers, were 10 or 12 Nakajima KI - 43 Oscars in a rough line up (not dispersed) perhaps readying for take. These aircraft and the hangars behind them were attacked in a single pass, before withdrawing westward at low level and maximum speed. A few minutes later perhaps 20 miles away form Magwe, I was following the line of a cheung (small creek), height about 250 feet, speed aboput 280 mph, when the aircraft gave a violent shudder, accompanied by a very lound, unusual noise. The cause was instantly apparent: the airscrew has disappeared completely, leaving only the spinning hub. My immediate reaction was to throttle back fully and switch off to stop the violently overspeeding engine. Further action was obvious: I was committed to staying with the aircraft because, with a high initial speed, not enough height to eject could be gained without the help of an airscrew. So I jettisoned the canopy and acknowledged gratefully the fact that I was following a creek; the banks of either side were hillocky ground, hostile to a forced landing aircraft. Flying the course of the creek, I soon found the aircraft to be near the stall (luckily, a lower than normal figure without an airscrew) extended the flaps and touched down wheels-up with minimum impact ( I have done worse landings on a smooth runway!) My luck was holding, if one can talk of luck in such a situation. December is the height of the dry season in that area and the creek had little water, it was shallow and narrow at the point where I came down: shallow enough to support the fusalage and narrow enough to support wing tips. So I released the harness, pushed the IFF Destruct switch, climed out and walked the wing ashore, dryshod. The question may occur -Why did not others in the squadron see their leader go down? - the answer is simple, the usual tatctic of withdrawal from an enemy target was to fly single at high speed and low level on parallel courses until a safe distance from target was attained. Then, the formation would climb to re-assemble. Having left the aircraft, I now faced a formidable escape problem? I was 300 miles from friendly territory: my desired route would be westward but 80% of that 300 miles was covered by steep north-south ridges impenetrably clothed in virgin jungle; these were natural impediments, there was also the enemy to consider. Having thought over my predicament, I decided the best I could do - having heard reports of mean herted plainspeope - was to get as far into the hills as possible and then find a (hopefully sympathetic) village. I suppose I may have covered about 15 miles by nightfall when I came upon this small hill village and walked into the village square. Nobody seemed surprised to see me (I suspect I had been followed for some time) I wa given a quiet welcome, seated at a table in the open and given food. Then exhaustion took over, I fell asleep in the chair and woke later to find myself tied up in it. Next day I was handed over to a Japanese sergeant and escort who took me back to Magwe and, soon after that, 2.5 years captivity in Rangoon jail.

Sadly we have learned that Byron Duckenfield passed away on 19th November 2010.



Byron Duckenfield during a signing session in March 2010.

Cranston Fine Arts extend our many thanks to Byron Duckenfield for signing a number of our art prints over a number of sessions.


Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC

27 / 12 / 2008Died : 27 / 12 / 2008
Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC

Joining 601 Squadron in 1938, Peter Dunning-White was called up to full-time service in August 1939, being posted to 29 Squadron in May 1940, then a few weeks later to 145 Squadron at Westhampnett, flying Hurricanes. He was soon in action over the Channel, sharing in the destruction of an HeIll on 18 July. Transferring to 615 Squadron in March 1941, on 15 April his victory over an Me109 confirmed him as an Ace. In 1942 he was attached to 409 Squadron RCAF, and then to 255 Squadron on Beaufighters. He went to North West Africa with this squadron, being made Flight Commander in March 1943. In July 1944 he was posted to 100 Group, Bomber Command. Sadly, he died on 27th December 2008.



Flight Lieutenant Eric R Edmunds
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Flight Lieutenant Eric R Edmunds

Flew Hurricanes with No.245 Sqn.



Colonel Bill Edwards
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Colonel Bill Edwards

Volunteering for the RAF in 1940, Bill Edwards was to fly 37 combat operations with 133 Squadron, the third Eagle Squadron to be formed, first on Hurricanes and then on Spitfires. Transferring to the 4th Fighter Group in September 1942, he was leading the Group on 13th July 1944 when he was shot down and taken prisoner of war. He remained in German captivity until liberated in June 1945. He retired from the USAF in 1968.




Wing Commander John Elkington
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Wing Commander John Elkington

John (Tim) Elkington was born in 1920 and joined the RAF in September 1939. Commissioned as a Pilot Officer in July 1940 he was immediately posted to join 1 Squadron flying Hurricanes atTangmere. On 15 August he shot down an Me109 over the Channel, but the following day he was himself shot down over Thorney Island. He baled out injured and was admitted to hospital, his Hurricane crashing at Chidham.




Air Commodore John Ellacombe CB DFC*
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Air Commodore John Ellacombe CB DFC*

John Ellacombe joined the RAF in 1939 and was posted to 151 Squadron in July 1940, immediately converting to Hurricanes. On 24th August he shot down a He111, but a week later his Hurricane was blown up in combat and he baled out, with burns. Rejoining his squadron a few months later, in February 1941 was posted to 253 Squadron where he took part in the Dieppe operations. On 28th July, flying a Turbinlite Havoc, he probably destroyed a Do217. Converting to Mosquitos, John was posted to 487 Squadron RNZAF, and during the build up to the Normandy Invasion and after, was involved in many ground attacks on enemy held airfields, railways, and other targets of opportunity. He completed a total of 37 sorties on Mosquitos. Flying a de Havilland Mosquito XIII with a devastating set of four 20mm cannon in the nose, John Ellacombe flew deep into occupied France on the night before D-Day searching out and destroying German convoys and railway targets. As the Normandy campaign raged on, 151 Squadron intensified its interdiction sorties - including night attacks on Falaise and the Seine bridges. On August 1st Ellacombe took part in the famous attack by 23 Mosquitoes on the German bar-racks in Poitiers, led by Group Captain Wykeham Barnes. Ellacombe had first joined 151 Squadron during the Battle of Britain, direct from Flying Training School. Within weeks he had scored his first victory but also force landed in a field, having shot down a He 111, and baled out of a blazing Hurricane. He baled out a second time during the Dieppe Raid in 1942 but was picked up safely. Postwar he had a long and successful career in the RAE.



Wing Commander Paul Farnes DFM
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27 / 12 / 2008Ace : 8.00 Victories
Wing Commander Paul Farnes DFM

Paul Farnes was born in Boscombe, Hampshire, July 16, 1918. He joined the RAFVR in April 1938 and is mobilized in July 1939 before being posted to 501 Squadron, 14 September 1939. He accompanied the Squadron when it was sent to France in May 1940, winning his first victories in the campaign of France and during the Battle of Britain. In October, he was awarded the DFM after eight victories and was promoted to officer the following month. In February 1941 he was transferred to 57 OTU as an instructor and then to 73 OTU in November, in Aden. In late February 1942, he was posted to 229 Squadron in North Africa as Flight Commander. On March 27, 1942, he flew to Malta with the rest of the Squadron aboard the Hurricane IIc BN122. After a period of intense and difficult battles in which defenders of the island will lose many fighters, during which he took command of the Squadron, he returned to Egypt with the survivors of his unit May 27, 1942. He then transferred to Iraq where he joined the Headquarters and remained there until March 1945. He then returned to Great Britain and three weeks after upgrading to the UTO 53, he took command of 124 Squadron, a position he held until the end of the war. He joined the Tangmere before making command of 611 Squadron equipped Mustang IV July 7, 1945. In August, the Squadron was disbanded and it supports the 164 Squadron with Spitfire IX. 63 Squadron was designated in August 1946. In January 1947, he became an officer of Liaison with training centres with the Air Ministry until October 1948. He then became an instructor in various centres. He continued his career in the RAF until 1958 and left active service with the rank of Wing Commander. He returned to his civilian career in the industry.




Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC
27 / 12 / 2008Ace : 7.00 Victories
Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, flying Hurricanes throughout the Battle of Britain with much success. 54(F) Sqn Spitfire 1942-1944 in Australia. Flew some missions in aircraft R4118, which saw a total of 49 combat missions, shooting down several enemy aircarft. It was in this aircraft that Bob Foster damaged two Ju88s and shared in the destruction of a third. He finished the war with 7 confirmed victories and 3 probables.




Warrant Officer Peter Fox
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10 / 6 / 2005Died : 10 / 6 / 2005
Warrant Officer Peter Fox

Peter Hutton Fox was born in Bridlington on 23rd January 1921 and educated at Warwick Public School. He joined the RAFVR in June 1939 and began training at 26 E&RFTS, Kidlington. Called up on 1st September he was posted to 13 EFTS Fairoaks on 28th March 1940 and then moved to 10 EFTS, Yatesbury on 28th May. Advanced training was carried out by Fox at 8 FTS, Montrose after which he went to 5 OTU, Aston Down to convert to Hurricanes and then joined 56 Squadron at Boscombe Down on 17th September 1940. Fox was shot down in combat with Do17s and Me110s over the Portland area on 30th September. Peter Fox was wounded in the leg and was forced to bale out over the Portland area. His Hurricane, N2434, crashed at Okeford Fitzpaine. On 16th November Fox and Pilot Officer MR Ingle-Finch were flying to Kidlington in a Magister, when they crashed near Tidworth. Both were injured and admitted to Tidworth Hospital. On 28th June 1941 Fox joined 234 Squadron at Warmwell. He was shot down over France on 20th October 1941 and captured. Freed on 16th April 1945, Fox left the RAF in 1946 as a Warrant Officer. He sadly passed away on 10th June 2005.



Squadron Leader Charles G Frizell
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Squadron Leader Charles G Frizell

Squadron Leader Charles George Frizell flew with RAF Squadron No. 257. His Hurricane fighter was shot down on Aug. 15, 1940, but Frizell bailed out of the burning aircraft and landed safely. Subsequently he fought in Africa and flew long-range shipping patrols from Gibraltar. He lives today in Tsawwassen, Canada.



Air Commodore J W Frost CBE, DFC, DL
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7 / 8 / 2010Died : 7 / 8 / 2010
Air Commodore J W Frost CBE, DFC, DL

Jack Frost commenced flying training in July 1941, completing his training in the USA. After a short period as a flying instructor he returned to the UK for operational training on Hurricanes. In February 1944 Jack Frost joined No 175 Squadron which was converting to the rocket-firing role. In April the squadron moved to the New Forest and started operations over northern France. Leading up to D-Day, Jack Frost flew 12 sorties, attacking vital radar stations that had to be put out of action before the invasion. On June 6 he flew an armed-reconnaissance sortie to attack enemy transports taking reinforcements to the beachhead. 175 Squadron equipped with Typhoons in January 1944. On August 7th 1944 a major German counter-attack, spearheaded by five Panzer divisions, was identified moving against just two US infantry divisions. The Panzers were threatening to cut off the US Third Army near the town of Mortain. More than 300 sorties were flown by the squadrons on the Day of the Typhoon. Frost claimed a Tiger tank and a troop carrier, as well as two unidentified targets as flamers. Frosts Typhoon was hit by 20mm flak but he managed to return to his airstrip. The intense effort of the Typhoon squadrons defeated the German counter-attack, which the Chief of Staff of the Seventh German Army reported had come to a standstill due to employment of fighter-bombers by the enemy and the absence of our own air support. Frost and his fellow Typhoon pilots were made available immediately to be called down over the radio by ground controllers as the Allied armies encircled the German Forces at Falaise and the break out from Normandy that followed. Jack Frost carried out many attacks against gun positions, tank and transport concentrations, all in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire. The Typhoon squadrons suffered heavy casualties. He completed an operational tour of 100 sorties in December 1944 and after the war went on to a distinguished career with the peacetime RAF. Flying Typhoons and the Tempest, based in Schleswig-Holstein then moving to Kastrup in Denmark. Jack frost would later command No 26 Squadron at Gutersloh in Germany. In 1948 he was appointed RAF Liaison Officer to HQ BETFOR, responsible for air advice and control of air support for the British Army Brigade, based in Trieste. During this sensitive period, Marshal Tito of Yugoslavia was causing some difficulties and Frost led a four-aircraft dummy attack on his headquarters as a reminder of the RAFs continued, and potent, presence in the area. In May 1949 he returned to Britain to command No 222 (Natal) Squadron, equipped with Meteor day fighters, as air defences were rebuilt with the emergence of the Soviet threat. Frost served in Malaya at the Air Headquarters during the communist insurrection, when he was involved with planning the development of airfields and air defence radar. After service in Hong Kong he returned to flying duties when he took command of No 151 Squadron, flying the delta-wing Javelin night fighter from Leuchars in Scotland. After a series of senior appointments in the MOD, Jack Frost was posted in August 1970 to the Joint Warfare Establishment. After a four-year appointment as Deputy and Chief of Staff to the UK Military Representative to Nato Headquarters in Brussels, he retired from the RAF in October 1976. Sadly Jack Frost passed away on August 7th 2010.



Group Captain Peter Gilpin CBE DFC
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Group Captain Peter Gilpin CBE DFC

Peter originally joined 253 Sqn flying Hurricanes, converting to Spitfire Mark 5s he took part in the invasions of North Africa and Sicily, providing fighter cover. Later based in Italy he was on a low level fighter sweep over Yugoslavia on the 2nd June 1944 when he was hit by ground fire and had to bale out. Captured by the Germans he was initially a PoW in Yugoslavia, before being transferred to Stalag Luft 7a, Moosberg, Germany.



Group Captain Tom Gleave
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Group Captain Tom Gleave






Flight Lieutenant John Golley
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Flight Lieutenant John Golley

John Golley flew Hurricanes, Spitfires and Typhoons during World War II, commencing his combat flying with fighter sweeps and ground attacks over Northern Europe. During the run up to D-Day his No. 245 Squadron Typhoons were equipped with rockets, specializing in tank-busting in the Normandy Campaign. He has written several best-selling military books including The Day of the Typhoon.



Flight Lieutenant A J Nat Gould
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Flight Lieutenant A J Nat Gould

Joined the RAAF in April 1940 and trained in Australia. Nat sailed to the UK in December 1940 and attended 56 OTU at Sutton Bridge. In April 1941 he joined 17 Sqn RAF and in September joined 134 Sqn equipped with Hurricanes and sailed aboard HMS Argus for Murmansk, USSR. After some ops, Nat returned to the UK in December and converted to Spitfires. He then sailed for Australia in March 1942 and joined 75 Sqn RAAF equipped with Kittyhawks. He flew to New Guinea in July and participated in the Battle of Milne Bay and on 28th August twice flew S A29-133 on ops and remained with 75 Sqn until December. After instructing at 2 OTU, Nat was posted in October 1943 to 457 Sqn equipped with Spitfires at Darwin. After 12 months of operations he returned to 2 OTU. In June 1945, Gould transferred to RANVR for service with the RN. Nat Gould commanded 816 Firefly and 806 Sea Fury Sqns during Korea.



Flight Lieutenant Bill Green
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Bill Green
Flight Lieutenant Bill Green

In December 1936, Bill Green joined the Auxiliary Air Force as an aero engine fitter with 501 Squadron at Filton, near Bristol. Shortly before the start of the Second World War, he was given a rare chance for an engine fitter. In 1938 he joined a scheme to recruit NCO pilots, qualifying as a Flight Sergeant and re-joined 501 at Bristol in July 1940. Sgt Bill Green had completed just 10 hours of dual flying – with an instructor. In October, he was sent for further flying instruction and on October 30th he had his first solo flight in a Magister aircraft. After more training – and getting married on June 3rd – he flew a Hurricane for the first time on August 8th 1940, when the Battle of Britain had been raging for a month. He flew from Kenley throughout the Battle of Britain until November, surviving being shot down twice, before being posted to 504 Squadron. After a spell instructing on Spitfires and Tomahawks, he converted to Typhoons, and from November 1944 served with 56 Squadron on Tempests. He flew more than 50 missions in Tempest fighter aircraft with 56 Squadron. He was shot down over Germany on February 22nd 1945 and spent the last three months of the war as a prisoner of war. After the war, Green enjoyed a hugely successful business career, ending up as the managing director and chairman of Crown Paints, before retiring on his 60th birthday.




Flt Lt W J Green
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Flt Lt W J Green

In December 1936, Flt. Lt. Green had joined the Royal Auxiliary Air Force as an engine fitter and later trained as a Hurricane pilot and joined No.501 Sqn on 19th August 1940. Flight Lieutenant Green had flown a total of only 5 hours on Hurricanes and had only flown one for the first time the day before going into action on 20th August 1940. Flt Lt Green flew Hurricanes for only 9 days during the Battle of Britain, between the 20th and 29th August, 1940. During this period in the Battle of Britain green was shot down twice: the first time on 24th August 1940, crash landing his Hurricane at Hawkinge and on the 29th August over Deal in Kent. Green baled out of his Mk.I Hurricane carrying code R4223 off Folkestone. Flt Lt Green never saw the aircraft that shot him down. The first thing Flight Lieutenant Green knew of being shot down on 29th August was a large hole appearing in his armoured windscreen and . He managed to exit his aircraft but his parachute initially failed to open as his drogue parachute lines had been cut about nine inches above where they joined the main parachute. His boots were ripped off his feet during the ensuing high-speed fall. The parachute eventually opened without the drogue and he landed in a farm in Elham Valley near Folkstone. Green could not stand due to his injuries and this would be the end of his participation in the Battle of Britian.



Flight Lieutenant Peter Hairs MBE
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Flight Lieutenant Peter Hairs MBE

Peter Hairs joined the RAFVR in 1937, and was called up at the outbreak of war in September 1939 to complete his training. After being commissioned he converted to Hurricanes, joining 501 Squadron at Tangmere in January 1940. He went to France with the squadron in May, claiming a share in a Dornier Do17 a few days after arriving. 501 covered the evacuation of the BEF from Cherbourg before re-assembling in England. On the 3 June he was shot down, but fortunately not seriously hurt and two days later he rejoined the squadron at Le Mans. On the 5th of September he downed an Me109, Peter Hairs was posted to 15 FTS, Kidlington on October 13 1940 as an instructor. He went to 2 CFS, Cranwell for an instructors course on February 23 1941. after which he taught at 11 FTS, Shawbury and 10 EFTS, Weston-Super-Mare before being posted to Canada in June as a EFTS flying instructor and then assistant CFI (EFTS). In December 1943 he was posted to join 276 Squadron to 19 OTU. He finished the was in India, receiving a mention in dispatches.



F/O Tony (Titch) Hallett DFC
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F/O Tony (Titch) Hallett DFC

F/O Tony (Titch) Hallett DFC a member of 198 Rocket Firing Typhoon Squadron operated from bases in Southern England (Manston to Hurn). Operating from Thorney Island on D-Day and then from several landing strips on The Beachhead, France and Belgium between January and November 1944. After Fighter Pilot training in the USA in 1941/42 he returned to the UK for conversion to Hurricanes and was then posted to an Army Co-operation Unit in Northern Ireland where he gained valuable experience flying various types of aircraft, i.e. Defiant, Lysander, Hurricane, Martinet and Twin Engine Oxford. His operational flying from Southern England consisted mainly of attacking the many strongly defended Radar Stations from Ostend to Cherbourg and on two occasions changed from rockets to bombs for attacks on Noball Targets (flying bomb sites). Operations from the landing strips consisted, with close Army Support, taking out Gun Positions, attacking Tanks and destroying anything that moved in enemy territory all against very heavy enemy Flak. He completed in excess of 100 sorties and since 1984 has revisited Normandy on many occasions. He attended the official funerals of two 198 Squadron Pilots whose aircraft wreckage had been discovered as many as 41 and 49 years after the events.



Wing Commander Taffy Higginson
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12 / 2 / 2003Died : 12 / 2 / 2003
12 / 2 / 2003Ace : 15.00 Victories
Wing Commander Taffy Higginson

Frederick William Higginson was born into a Welsh-speaking family at Gorseinon, near Swansea, where his father was a policeman. He attended Gorseinon Grammar School until beginning his apprenticeship with the RAF. Enlisting in 1929 at the age of 16, Taffy Higginson served as a fitter and air gunner with No.7 Sqn until 1935, when he was accepted for flight training. After qualifying as a pilot, he initially flew with No.19 Sqn before transferring to No.56 Sqn on Hurricanes. By June 1941 he had tallied a score of 12 victories. On June 17th, 1941, he was shot down by anti-aircraft fire over Dunkirk while escorting bombers returning from an operation over Lille. With considerable height in hand, he was able to bale out safely and guide his parachute to land in a wood near a railway. Having a map, he established that he was about 12 miles northwest of Fauquembergues but he had lost one of his boots in ejecting from his Hurricane. Limping along, he was overtaken by two German soldiers on a motorcycle combination sent out to find him. His capture appeared certain but the abrupt appearance of a low-flying Luftwaffe aircraft distracted the soldier driving the motorcycle, enabling Higginson to wrench over the handlebars, crash the machine into a ditch and make off in the confusion. He hid in the wood until after dark and then made his way to a hut on the edge, where he sought assistance from the owner. Confident of his limited French, he ordered a glass of beer, paid for it with money provided by the French farmer and hitched a lift with a lorry driver who took him to a local garage whose owner had contacts with an escape line for British airmen. After a series of adventures, Higginson crossed into Vichy- controlled France and made contact with the MI9 escape line run by the Belgian doctor Albert-Marie Guérisse, alias “Pat O’Leary”. While attempting to cross into Spain with an Australian escaped prisoner of war, he was stopped and arrested by Vichy French frontier guards and interned in Fort de la Revère near Nice. Thanks to the efforts of Guérisse, he escaped from there and was eventually taken off the French Mediterranean coast by a Polish-manned trawler operating out of Gibraltar under the auspices of the Special Operations Executive. He was landed at Greenock on October 5, 1942, and rejoined No 56 Squadron shortly afterwards. He was awarded the DFC in 1943. After the war he served with Headquarters 11 Group, attended the RAF Staff course at Bracknell and also graduated from the Army Staff College, Camberley. He resigned from the RAF in 1956 to join the Bristol aircraft manufacturers at Filton, where the company was developing the ground-to-air rocket-powered defensive system, Bloodhound. In 1963 he joined the board of Bristol and was appointed OBE for services to industry that year. Sadly Frederick William Higginson passed away on 12th February 2003, aged 89.



Warrant Officer Jack Hodges DFC
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Warrant Officer Jack Hodges DFC

Jack Hodges joined the RAF in late 1940, and after completing his pilot training in Canada he returned to England and was then briefly sent to a Photo Reconnaissance Unit flying Spitfires. He moved to a OTU in Annan, Scotland on Hurricanes before finally moving to a holding unit in Redhill, flying Typhoons. In 1944 he was posted to join 175 Squadron. Shortly after this he moved to 174 Squadron at Westhampnett. He served on operations throughout occupied Europe until the end of the war, being awarded the DFC in 1945 for successfully leading a group of Typhoons against a German Armoured Division.



Flt. Lt. David Ince DFC
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Flt. Lt. David Ince DFC

Flt. Lt. David Ince DFC was born in Glasgow and was educated at Aysgarth School and Cheltenham College. Failing to meet the eyesight standards for aircrew he became a gunner officer in 1940 and managed to pass a wartime RAF medical board at his third attempt. Seconded for Army Cooperation duties, he trained in Canada at 35 EFTS and 37 SFTS before returning to the UK to fly Hurricanes and Mustangs at 41 OTU. Subsequently converting to Typhoons he flew with 193 and 257 Squadrons, from Normandy until the end of hostilities in Europe, completing almost 150 sorties and being awarded an immediate DFC. He took a leading part in trials, demonstrations and the early operational use of Napalm. Almost shot down on one reconnaissance flight, he later devised and proved a camera installation for low level close up target photography, which was an immediate success. In the closing stages of the war he was leading 193 Squadron on shipping strikes in the Baltic. After attending the first post war course at The Empire Test Pilots School he returned to University to complete an engineering degree.



Group Captain Alec Ingle
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31 / 7 / 1999Died : 31 / 7 / 1999
Group Captain Alec Ingle

Alec Ingle was commissioned in June 1940 and joined 615 Squadron at Drem flying Hurricanes before moving to Croydon during the Battle of Britain. He probably destroyed a Do17 in September; in October he shot down an Me109 and probably two more, and yet another victory in November, at which time he was appointed B Flight Commander. He later commanded 609 Squadron at Manston before leading 124 Wing in 1943 flying Typhoons. He was shot down in September 1943 after his Typhoon blew up in combat with an Fw190. Badly burned, he spent the remainder of the war as a POW in Stalag Luft III. Alec Ingle was awarded the AFC and DFC. Sadly Alec Ingle died on 31st July 1999.




Wing Commander M R Ingle-Finch DFC, AFC
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2002Died : 2002
Wing Commander M R Ingle-Finch DFC, AFC

Michael Ingle-Finch commenced his operational RAF career flying Hurricanes during and after the Battle of Britain. He then joined 56 Squadron based at Duxford and was amongst the first squadron pilots to fly a Typhoon when the first operational Typhoons came into service on that significant day, 11th September 1941. In September 1942, by now promoted to Flight Commander, Ingle-Finch achieved another first - 56 Squadrons first air victory in a Typhoon when he shot down a Junkers Ju88 off the east coast. Having been involved with Typhoons since they became operational, Ingle-Finch went on to fly them throughout their operational life. On 31st December 1943, he was promoted to command 175 Squadron during the decisive campaign in Normandy. In that same year he was awarded the DFC. His distinguished wartime service in the RAF culminated in promotion to Wing Commander Flying of 124 Wing. Passed away 2002.



Flight Lieutenant Ray Jackson MC
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Flight Lieutenant Ray Jackson MC

Spending all his flying career with 34 Squadron, Ray was posted out to the Burma Front in 1943. Originally flying Hurricane IIcs, he was forced to bale out over the jungle and won his MC for his successful evasion of the enemy. He later converted to Thunderbolts with the same Squadron.



Squadron Leader Frank Joyce MBE
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Squadron Leader Frank Joyce MBE

Originally flying Hurricanes with 87 Squadron, he was shot down in May 1940 during the Battle of France, was badly injured bailing out and lost his leg. After having a false leg fitted, he returned to active service duties with 286 Squadron, flying Defiants on coastal patrols.



Squadron Leaader Raymond E Kellow
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Squadron Leaader Raymond E Kellow

Squadron Leader Raymond Alan Kellow, 213 Squadron, Cambridgeshire, Hurricanes



Warrant Officer Terrence Kelly
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Warrant Officer Terrence Kelly

As a pilot for 258 Squadron flying Hurricanes, Terrence left England in October 1941 for Singapore. Flying against the Japanese he was caught on the island of Java with no means of evacuation and went into the bag in March 1942 and was a prisoner of the Japanese for 3 long years.




Flight Lieutenant N L D Kemp DFC
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13 / 3 / 2005Died : 13 / 3 / 2005
Flight Lieutenant N L D Kemp DFC

A Battle of Britain veteran who had flown with Douglas Bader in the famous 242 Canadian squadron. Nigel Kemp transferred with the squadron to Malta in 1941, flying his Hurricane of Ark Royal on Nmember 12. The squadron sufferred such heavy losses in Malta that in March 1942 the survivors were absorbed into 126 and 185 Squadrons. He had been with 242 in 1941 when the squadron was re-equipped with the Hurricane II and took part in the cross channel offensive, receiving the D17C in October 1941 for a series of daring attacks on enemy shipping. Nigel Kemp passed away on 13th March 2005.



Squadron Leader Robert Kings
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Squadron Leader Robert Kings

Robert Kings flew Hurricanes in the Battle of Britain with 238 Squadron at St Eval, where he was twice forced to bale out, the second time being hospitalised after a heavy landing due to a damaged parachute. Rejoining the squadron, in 1941 they embarked for North Affica, attached to 274 Squadron in the Western Desert. In November 1941 his Hurricane was shot down over the desert, where he was spotted and rescued by soldiers from the 22nd Armoured Division en-route to Tobruk, and was able to rejoin his squadron. Bob Kings was also a test pilot on Typhoons.




Squadron Leader Franciszek Kornicki
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Squadron Leader Franciszek Kornicki

Posted in 1939 to 3rd Fighter Wing in Lwow as part of the Polish Air Force. This area was soon overrun by Germans so he travelled to England to join 303 Polish Sqn on Spitfires and also served with 308, 315 and 317 Squadrons carrying out many fighter sweeps over France and occupied Europe.



Squadron Leader Ginger Lacey DFM
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30 / 5 / 1989Died : 30 / 5 / 1989
30 / 5 / 1989Ace : 28.00 Victories
Squadron Leader Ginger Lacey DFM

James Harry Lacey, from Wetherby, who was destined to become the top scoring RAF fighter pilot in the Battle of Britain, joined the RAFVR. in 1937. After an instructors course in 1938 he became an instructor at the Yorkshire Aeroplane Club. Called up at the outbreak of war, he was posted to 501 Squadron, and in May 1940 was posted with the unit to France. On the 13th he set off late on an early patrol, and shot down a Bf 109 and a He 111. Later in the day he destroyed a Bf 110. On the 27th he destroyed two He 11 Is and then returned to the United Kingdom, in June, having made an emergency landing in a swamp on the 9th and overturned, nearly being drowned. On 20 July he shot down a 13f 109, and was then awarded a DFM. In the Battle of Britain, during August, he destroyed a Ju 87 and a probable on the 12th, damaged a Do 17 on the 15th, probably destroyed a Bf 109 on the 16th, and on the 24th shot down a Ju 88 and damaged a Do 17. On the 29th he destroyed a 13f 109 and next day claimed a He 111 and probablya Bf110. He shot down a Bf109 on the 31st and on 2 September got two Bf 109s and damaged a Do 17. Two days later he destroyed two more Bf 109s, and was then sent on leave for a few days. on his return, on the 13th, he took off in very bad weather to shoot down a lone He 111 which had just bombed Buckingham Palace. Having destroyed it, he found the cloud too thick to return to base and was forced to bale out. On the 15th he shot down another He 111 and two Bf 109s with a third damaged, on the 27th destroyed another Bf 109 and on the 30th damaged a Ju 88. During October he was in action frequently against Bf 109s, getting a probable on the 7th and destroying others on the 12th, 26th, and the 30th, damaging one also on this latter date. His score was now 23, and he had been shot down or forced to bale out nine times. Of his victories 18 were gained during the Battle of Britain, and this was the highest score of any pilot for this period. In December he received a Bar to his DFM and was commissioned the following month. He converted to Spitfires early in 1941, and in June became a flight commander. During July he destroyed a Bf 109 on the 10th, damaged one on the 14th, shot down a He 59 floatplane on the 17th and destroyed two more Bf 109s on the 24th, causing them to collide. He was then posted as an instructor to 57 OTU where he trained, among others, George Beurling. In March 1942 he was posted to 602 Squadron, and on 24th March damaged a Fw 190. On 25 April he damaged two more, but was then posted to HQ 81 Group as Tactics Officer, now as a Sqn. Ldr. He spent some while testing Hurricanes with rocket projectiles and 40 mm. anti-tank guns, and then became Chief Flying Instructor at Millfield. In March 1943 he was sent to India, and first was responsible for converting squadrons to Hurricanes at Madras. He then moved to Bangalore, where he converted Hurricane pilots to Thunderbolts. In September 1944 he was posted to 3 TAC at Komila as Sqn. Ldr. Tactics, and the following month attended an Air Fighting Instructors Course at Armarda Road, which was run by Wg. Cdr. F.R. Carey. In November he became temporary commanding officer of 155 Squadron, flying Spitfire 8s in Burma, but later that month took command of 17 Squadron, equipped with the same aircraft. His squadron was responsible for giving ground support to a Gurkha regiment, so he ordered his pilots to have their heads shaved in the Gurkha fashion, which proved to be a very popular move. On 19 February 1945 he shot down a Nakajima Ki 43 Oscar, his twenty-eighth and last victory. He died on 30th May 1989.

Citation for award of Distinguished Flying Medal, awarded 23rd August 1940 :

Sergeant Lacey has taken part in numerous patrols against the enemy. He has displayed great determination and coolness in combat, and has destroyed six enemy aircraft.

Citation for award of Bar to the Distinguished Flying Medal, awarded 26th November 1940 :

Sergeant Lacey has shown consistent efficiency and great courage. He has led his section on many occasions and his splendid qualities as a fighter pilot have enabled him to destroy at least 19 enemy aircraft.



Flight Lieutenant Sir Archie Lamb KBE CMG DFC
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Flight Lieutenant Sir Archie Lamb KBE CMG DFC

Archie Lamb joined the RAF from the Foreign Office after the outbreak of war. Returning from training in Southern Rhodesia, his troopship Orinsay was torpedoed, and he spent nine days in a lifeboat. Joining 184 Squadron, flying Hurricane rocket-firing fighter-bombers, the squadron converted to Typhoons early in 1944. Flying from Westhampnett, he flew two missions on D-Day. He transferred to 245 Squadron in mid 1944 as a Flight Commander. After the war he returned to the Foreign Office, becoming H.M. Ambassador to Kuwait, and to Norway.



Squadron Leader Robin Langdon-Davies DFC
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Squadron Leader Robin Langdon-Davies DFC

Officer Commanding 6 Squadron 1944, Hurricane ground attack Pilot




Squadron Leader Keith Lawrence DFC
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30 / 5 / 1989Ace : 5.00 Victories
Squadron Leader Keith Lawrence DFC

Keith Lawrence was born in New Zealand at Waitara on November 25th 1919. After attending Southland Boys High School at Invercargill, Lawrence went to work in a local bank in December 1936. In November 1938 he applied to join the RAF and was accepted for pilot training in Britain and sailed in February 1939. In November 1939 Keith Lawrence completed his flying training and joined the newly-formed 234 Squadron, which flew Spitfires throughout the Battle of Britain. Whilst based at St Eval in Cornwall, Lawrence shared 234s first victory on 8th July 1940 with the destruction of a Ju88 which was attacking a convoy in the Western Approaches. 234 Squadron was posted to Middle Wallop on 15 August. On 15 September Lawrence was posted to 603 Squadron at Hornchurch, and on 8 October moved to 421 Flight at Gravesend, a unit which early the following year became 91 Squadron. During the Battle of Britain he destroyed two enemy aircraft and damaged four others. Whilst on a weather reconnaissance on 26 November 1940, Lawrences Spitfire was shot down by ME 109s, his Spitfire breaking up and throwing him clear to parachute into the sea. Lawrence was picked up by a RNLI lifeboat, and having suffered severe leg injuries and a dislocated arm, was taken to hospital. He returned to 91 Squadron on the 16th of January 1942. On the 17th of February 1942 Lawrence was posted to 185 Squadron in Malta. At this time, the island’s capital Valetta and its airfields were suffering almost constant bombardment from bombers with fighter escorts which generally considerably outnumbered the defending fighters. While in Malta, Lawrence was promoted to squadron commander. The Squadron flew Hurricanes until Spitfires arrived on 9 May. Lawrence returned to the UK from Malta at the end of June 1942, and began a long period as an instructor. He served at three different Operational Training Units, and after receiving training at the Central Gunnery School at Sutton Bridge, became a gunnery instructor flying Spitfires. Lawrence returned to operations with 124 Squadron from early February until the end of April 1945. The unit had been successfully intercepting German reconnaissance aircraft at 50,000 feet plus, using Spitfire VIIs with pressurised cockpits, flying from Manston. As Lawrence arrived, it was re-equipping with Spitfire IX’s to carry out dive-bombing attacks on V2 sites around The Hague from RAF Coltishall. After each aircraft had dropped its 1000 lb bomb-load, it flew on to captured airfields in Belgium, and refuelled and re-armed, before bombing targets again during the return flight to Coltishall. The unit also carried out daylight escorts for bombers raiding into Germany. From the end of August 1945 Lawrence flew Meteors with 124 Squadron until he was released from the RAF in March 1946. He returned to New Zealand and settled in Christchurch but later returned to Britain.




Squadron Leader Kenneth Lee
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15 / 1 / 2008Died : 15 / 1 / 2008
15 / 1 / 2008Ace : 7.00 Victories
Squadron Leader Kenneth Lee

Kenneth Norman Thomson Lee was a Battle of Britain pilot who volunteered for the RAF in 1937. Kenneth Lee joined 111 Squadron at Northolt in March 1939. He was commissioned and went to 43 Squadron at Tangmere. Kenneth Lee flew Hurricanes during the Battles of France and Britain with No.501 Sqn, based at Filton and accumulated 7 victories, the first being when 501 Squadron went to France on May 10th 1940 and Kenneth Lee claimed a Bf 110 destroyed later that day. On the 12th he destroyed a Do 17 and a Bf109. The Squadron flew back from France on June 18th and re-assembled at Croydon on the 21st. On May 27th Kenneth Lee claimed an He111 destroyed and a Do17 on June 6th. While attacking a formation of He111s on June 10th Lee's Hurricane was hit by return fire from one of the He111s and exploded. He took to his parachute and landed at Le Mans. Kenneth Lee damaged a Ju 87 on July 29th and on August 12th destroyed another Ju87. While flying his Hurricane (P3059) Lee was shot down for a second time on the 18th when Oberleutnant Schopfel in an Me109 of III./JG26 shot him down over Canterbury. He was one of four Hurricane of the squadron claimed by Schopfel that day. Kenneth Lee baled out, with a bullet wound in the leg and landed near Whitstable. In October, Lee rejoined 501 Sqn and on the 22nd October he was awarded the DFC. On November 29th Lee was posted to the Special Duties flight at Stormy Down and later transferred as Flight Commander to 52 OTU, at Crosby-On-Eden. In December 1941 Kenneth Lee became Flight Commander with 112 Squadron when he was posted to the Middle East and on the 18th of September 1942 Lee moved to 260 Squadron. On 10th November he destroyed an Mc202. He took control of 123 Squadron at Abadan, Persia in March 1943. In May, Lee with 123 Squadron went to the Western Desert and on July 27th 1943 Lee was shot down for the third time and captured on a dawn raid on Crete. He was taken prisoner of war to Stalag Luft 111 at Sagan and Belaria. Ken Lee left the RAF in late 1945 as a Squadron Leader. Sadly, Kenneth Lee passed away on 15th January 2008.




Squadron Leader P G Leggett
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Squadron Leader P G Leggett

Percival Graham Leggett was born on the 24th of February 1921 and joined the RAFVR In June 1939 as an Airman under training Pilot. He was called up for active duty on 1 September 1939 and he completed his training in September 1940. On the 18 September 1940 Leggett crashed at Oldbury on Severn in Gloucestershire but was unhurt. Leggett was posted to No.615 Squadron at RAF Prestick in Scotland then to 245 Squadron at RAF Aldergrove on 28 September and then to No.46 Squadron at RAF Stapleford on 18 October 1940. He claimed a Fiat BR.20 and probably destroyed and shared in the destruction of another on 11 November 1940. Leggett was then posted to No.145 Squadron in late November 1940 and then to No.96 Squadron on 18 December 1940. Flying his Hurricane off Ark Royal, Leggett joined 249 Squadron in Malta in June 1941 and was in action that same afternoon. In July he increased his Battle of Britain score by shooting down a Macchi C.200 but was shot down in December, bailing out with minor injuries. He was posted to the Desert Air Force just before El Alamein. An RAFVR pilot, Leggett had flown both Hurricanes and Defiants before his posting to Malta. He stayed on in the RAF commanding 73 Squadron on Vampires, retiring in 1958 as a Squadron Leader.




Squadron Leader Arthur Leigh DFC, DFM
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Squadron Leader Arthur Leigh DFC, DFM

Another RAFVR pilot, The son of a regular soldier, Arthur Leigh was called up at the outbreak of war. After finishing his flying training he was posted to 7 OTU and then on to convert to Spitfires in August 1940. Arthur Leigh flew with 64 Squadron at Leconfield and 72 Squadron at Biggin Hill during the Battle of Britain before transferring to 611 Squadron. Awarded the DFM in September 1941, Leigh had then completed 50 sweeps, had destroyed two Bf 109s, probably destroyed another four and shared in the destruction of a Do 17. After a spell instructing and ferrying Hurricanes from Gibraltar to Cairo, he returned to operations with 56 Squadron flying Typhoons from Manston. He was shot down on his first sweep by flak, near Calais but was picked up by an ASR launch. In late 1943 Leigh was posted to 129 Squadron at Hornchurch and was awarded the DDC on completing his second tour in December 1944, spending the rest of the war as an instructor.



Wing Commander James Lindsay DFC
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15 / 1 / 2008Ace : 7.00 Victories
Wing Commander James Lindsay DFC

Born in September 1922, James Doug Lindsay joined the RCAF in February 1941, training on Harvards. He was posted to the UK, arriving in March 1943 and joining 403 Sqn in October that year. In his first tour, he claimed 5 Me109s as well as 2 Fw190s, plus another damaged. Of the Me109s he shot down, three of these were in a single minute, earning him a DFC. For his second tour, he rejoined 403 Sqn in April 1945, claiming a probable Fw190 during his short time with this squadron before he moved to 416 squadron until the end of the war in Europe. After the war he stayed with the air force, and in 1952 served during the Korean war with the USAF. He flew F-86 Sabres with the 39th Fighter Squadron of the 51st Fighter Wing, claiming victories over two MiG-15s and damaging 3 others. In 1953, he returned to the UK with No.1 Fighter Wing leading Sabres in formation at the Queen's Coronation. He retired in 1972, having flown more than 30 different types of aircraft (excluding different Mks). These included, Harvard, Anson, Master, Spitfire, Typhoon, Tempest, Hurricane, Mustang, Beaufort, Beaufighter, Oxford, Dakota, Tiger Moth, Vampire and Sabre.




Flight Lieutenant Derek Lovell
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Flight Lieutenant Derek Lovell

Volunteered for the RAFVR in January 1941. He trained in Canada on Tiger Moths and Oxfords. He received his wings in April 1942 and was posted to Central Flying School. Following graduation, he taught Fleet Air Arm trainees on Harvards. He returned to the UK in March 1943 and flew Masters at AFU and Hurricanes at OTU. He taught Lancaster crews fighter evasion prior to posting to 84 GSU to fly Typhoons. He joined 197 Squadron at Needs Oar Point in the New Forest in June 1944 and was involved in close support operations and tactical dive bombing and low level bombing throughout the Normandy campaign and on through to VE-Day. He completed 135 operations and in August 1945 was posted to an OTU to instruct on Typhoons and Tempest Vs. He was demobbed in June 1946 and flew weekends in the VR on Tiger Moths and later Chipmunks. He was called up on the G Reserve in July 1951 and flew Harvards, Spitfire XXIIs and then Vampire Vs. He stood down in September as the Korea situation eased.




Flt/Lt Julian Lowe DFC
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Flt/Lt Julian Lowe DFC

Flt/Lt Julian Lowe DFC joined the RAF in 1941 having escaped from a reserved occupation, and, after I.T., he was sent to Southern Rhodesia to fly on Tiger Moths and Harvards. From there he went to 74 OTU in Palestine flying Hurricanes. He was posted to 2 PRU (later 680 Squadron) in Cairo and completed 86 ops over North Africa, Greece and the Aegian. He was awarded the DFC in March 1944 and returned to the UK to join 542 Squadron at Benson in October 1944, where he did a further 30 ops over germany before the war in Europe ended. After a short period in the RAFVR, he joined No 6 Air Experience Flight and flew Chipmunks for 26 years logging some 2000 hours on that aircraft.




Wng Cmdr Ken Mackenzie
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4 / 6 / 2009Died : 4 / 6 / 2009
4 / 6 / 2009Ace : 8.00 Victories
Wng Cmdr Ken Mackenzie

Ken Mackenzie flew 2 ops on Hurricanes with No.43 Sqn before joining No.501 Sqn based at Kenley during the Battle of Britain, again on Hurricanes. During his time with No.501 Sqn, he claimed 7 victories, with a further 4 shared and 3 damaged. In the most remarkable of these, Ken was following what he thought was a damaged Me109 down to sea level. Realising the aircraft was not damaged, he deliberately struck the tailplane of the enemy aircraft with the wing of his Hurricane (V6799), forcing his opponent to crash. He was subsequently awarded the DFC on 25th October 1940. After this, he joined No.247 Sqn flying night fighter Hurricanes shooting down 10 aircraft in one year. He was shot down on the 29th of September 1941 after claiming an He111 bomber in a night attack planned to target Lannion airfield in Brittany. Ken was engaged by heavy flak from ground defences and completed this sortie by ditching in the sea. He paddled to shore in his dinghy and was subsequently captured and taken prisoner. Ken MacKenzie was posted to various camps before ending up in Stalag Luft 111, Sagan, and was finally repatriated to the UK in October 1944. He was posted to 53 OTU, Kirton-In-Lindsey on 19th December 1945 as an instructor and on 17th June 1945, posted to 61 OTU, Keevil, as a Flight Commander. After the war on the 1st January 1953, Ken was awarded the Air Force Cross. Retired from the RAF on 1st July 1967 with the rank of Wing Commander. Sadly, Wing Commander Ken Mackenzie died on 4th June 2009




Flt. Lt. Peter May
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Flt. Lt. Peter May

Peter May was under training as a pilot in the Civil Air Guard at Weston Super Mare on the 3d September 1939 and was immediately accepted for further training with the RAF at Downing College, Cambridge. In June 1940 he was posted to a holding unit at Hernswell, near Lincoln, from which Hampden aircraft were employed in dropping leaflets over Germany. This aerodrome was subjected to one of the first, possibly the first, bombing raid on England by the Germans. Peter went solo on a Magister monoplane at Kingsdown Aerodrome, Chester on the 26 th June 1940. On the 1st July he suffered an engine failure over the Solway Firth, but managed to force land safely. As a reward for this safe landing he was one of six fortunate pupils on the Course of 52 to be selected for training as fighter pilots. His first solo flight in a Spitfire 1 at Hawardene Operational Unit, was on the 10th December 1940. A few days later flying over Liverpool in poor visibility, the engine failed. He decided to pancake in the Mersey but fortunately at the last minute he saw a field alongside. By using his emergency pressure bottle to lower the undercarriage quickly he managed to force land safely. Spitfire 1 aircraft undercarriage had to be raised and lowered manually. In January 1941 with only 20 hours experience on Spitfires he was posted to Sailor Malan's 74 Squadron based at Biggin Hill and later at Manston. This squadron was engaged in protecting the Channel convoys, the south-coast radar stations and the Lysanders on rescue missions over the North Sea. Returning from operational patrol over the Channel on the 21st April 1941, Peter crash-landed at Manston Aerodrome. he was taken to Margate General Hospital suffering from concussion and a broken leg. During the latter part of 1941 Peter was appointed Aerodrome Control Pilot at Manston and recommenced flying non-operationaily in December 1941. In June 1942 he moved to No. 1 Squadron at Tangmere, flying Hurricanes and mainly engaged in sweeps over France. In July it was decided to convert No. 1 squadron into a Night Fighter Squadron. As Peter's nightflying experience was limited he was sent on a Beam Approach Course at Watchfield. Peter was commissioned in 1943 and in 1944 was appointed C.O. of a Communications Flight on the island of Orkney. In July 1945 he joined 286 Hurricane Squadron at Weston Zoyland, Somerset, flying mostly at night. His completed his flying career as Naval Liaison Officer with 667 Squadron at Gosport, flying Spitfire XV1 s. Peter amassed 1687 flying hours, including 110 in Spitfires and 55 in Hurricanes.



Squadron Leader Roy McGowan
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Squadron Leader Roy McGowan

Flying Hurricanes with No.46 Squadron, Roy McGowan was shot down on 15th September 1940. Sufferring from severe burns he was hospitalised and treated by the pioneering plastic surgeon Archie McIndoe, and was one of the founding members of the famous Guinea Pig Club.




Squadron Leader Jocelyn G P Millard
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10 / 5 / 2010Died : 10 / 5 / 2010
Squadron Leader Jocelyn G P Millard

Volunteering for the RAFVR in August 1939, J G Millard was called up for full time service the following month. Converting to Hurricanes, he was posted to 1 Squadron at Wittering in October 1940, and shortly after transferred to Dougla Baders 242 Squadron at Coltishall. In November he moved to 615 Squadron at Northolt. After the Battle of Britain he spent time as an instructor, going to Canada. He later became Squadron Commander of 35 SFTS. Sadly, Jocelyn Millard passed away on the 10th of May 2010.



Major Michael Miluck
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Major Michael Miluck

American volunteer Michael Miluck arrived in the UK in September 1941, and was posted to join 71 Eagle Squadron. Flying Spitfire Mk Vbs the squadron was engaged in escort and offensive fighter sweeps over the channel and northern France, taking part in the air cover over Dieppe. Later he flew Hurricanes with 250 Squadron.




Squadron Leader Harry Moon
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Squadron Leader Harry Moon

Flying his Hurricane off the carrier Ark Royal for Malta on June 30th 1941, Harry Moon was fortunate to arrive on the island to join 249 Squadron in a period when the opposition was provided by the Italians. The Hurricane were equal to this task and Moon took part in many combats. However, in December the Lufttwaffe appeared again and losses rose sharply. In February 1942, he was transferred to 126 Squadron when 249 was temporarily disbanded as a result of losses and pending the arrival of Spitfires. In April 1942, he was posted to the Middle East.



Wing Commander Roger Morewood
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Wing Commander Roger Morewood

An uncle suggested to Roger Morewood that he should join the RAF so Roger did at the age of 17. Roger said : I was going be a pilot, that was the only reason to join. Roger trained to fly in a Tiger Moth biplane before joining 56 Squadron - regarded within the RAF as an elite unit - flying open cockpit Gauntlet fighters. The squadron were then re-equipped with Gloster Gladiators - the last RAF biplane - then the Hawker Hurricanes that would join Spitfires in fighting off Hitlers Luftwaffe in the Battle of Britain. While serving with 56 Squadron Roger Morewood was assigned the dangerous role of long-range fighter sweeps over the coast of occupied France and Holland but left to help form 248 Sqn at Hendon with whom he served throughout the Battle of Britain flying Blenheims. Roger said: We had a few panic station alerts when we were scrambled. We wouldd be leaping into our aircraft with flying suits over our pyjamas as we tried to get into the air in a minute and a half. In July 1942 Morewood went to 9 OTU and later HQ Transport Command. After a long post-war career in the RAF he retired in 1957. Roger Morewood once said of his squadron: It was damned dodgy. We had a high loss rate on operations. And on one sortie - then aged 21 - he nearly met his maker : I flew across to Den Helder (Northern Holland) in a long-nosed Blenheim to look after this battleship at the entrance to the Zuiderzee. We flew round this thing and sure enough I saw some aircraft coming up. They were twin-engine bombers naturally - Messerschmitt 110s. That was a bit hairy. My two blokes (other pilots) shoved off in a hurry into a cloud, and there was me popping away until I ran out of ammunition. There was just me left. I realised there was no point chasing - I was not going to knock his wings off. So I started flying home. After making hardly any noise all flight the chap (navigator) in the back said you haveve got somebody on your tail now - you had better move swiftly. So I moved to left and right. We got a pretty hefty clobbering. His turret disappeared at the back. My poor navigator wore a tin hat and I dont blame him. He got a bullet half way through his armour. He was alright. I had a dreadful wound. If I shook my hand really hard I could get blood out of one finger. I was hit all over the place. We took dozens of bullets. The aircraft was ruined. That is all there was to it. We were still going home - even with the North Sea to go across. So I trundled off back and ditched the damn thing. Thank God it didnt blow up. We literally got away with it. It was the hairiest trip I ever did. On another occasion, Roger intercepted a German weather forecasting flying boat called Weary Willy : I was in a Beaufighter at this time. I flew upwind and had a shot at him downwind. Then all the guns jammed. So I pulled alongside him - not too close - and waved him good luck lad. Anyway he sank when he got back to Norway. That was that one finished. Flying from Shetland, his squadron attacked German shipping off Norway. Roger was rested and spent two years training new Beaufighter pilots but still managed to go on some operations, mainly attacking convoys off the coast of Holland. Roger Morewood said: job was to attack the flak ships, floating anti-aircraft batteries, so other Beaufighters could attack the cargo ships. It could be pretty hairy as 12 Beaufighters lined up to have a crack at the target. You wouldd see tracer shells from your mates plane whizzing over your head or underneath you. They were a bigger danger than the Germans Wing Commander Roger Morwood was posted to the Mediterranean where he contracted TB. He recalled: "In hospital, they treated you with whisky in milk and a pint of Guinness for breakfast, very primitive stuff." When the war ended and the RAF were scaled down, Roger continued to serve in various postings around the UK until 1947. after leaving the RAF Roger was recalled again as an instructor at the Central Flying School, but with the rank of flight lieutenant. He was posted to Edinburgh and then Glasgow University squadrons. finnaly leaving service in 1957. Wing Commander Roger Morewood notched up more than 5000 flying hours in 32 different types of aircraft.

Roger Morewood signing the print A Day for Heroes

Roger Morewood signing the print Ground Force




Group Captain Tom Dalton Morgan DSO, DFC*, OBE
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18 / 9 / 2004Died : 18 / 9 / 2004
Group Captain Tom Dalton Morgan DSO, DFC*, OBE

Tom joined the RAF in 1935, serving with 22 Squadron. In June 1940 he was posted to Tangmere as B Flight commander with 43 Squadron, flying Hurricanes, scoring his first victory on 12 July. In action over the Channel in August he was hit by crossfire, bailing out with slight wounds. He soon resumed flying but was again wounded on 6 September. Ten days later he was promoted to command 43 Squadron. In January 1942 he left the squadron to become a Controller. Promoted Wing Commander Operations with 13 Group, he then led the Ibsley Wing, consisting of 4 Spitfire, 2 Whirlwind, and 2 Mustang Squadrons. His final victory in May 1943 brought his score to 17. Briefly attached to the USAAF 4th Fighter Group, he was then Operations Officer with the 2nd TAF until the end of the war. He died 18th September 2004.




Air Commodore Mickey Mount CBE DSO DFC
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4 / 8 / 2002Died : 4 / 8 / 2002
Air Commodore Mickey Mount CBE DSO DFC

Flying Officer C.J Mount joined NO.602 squadron on August 8th 1940 after a brief conversion course on Spitfires. On August 18th his Spitfire L1005 was severely damaged in combat with JU 87s and BF109s over Ford. Micky was unhurt. he again escaped injury when his Spitfire X4270 was damaged landing at Tangmere. he served in many of the theatres of WW2 and he flew Hurricanes in Malta and North Africa and Wellingtons in the Middle east. Micky retired and lived in Ascot in Berkshire. He died 4th August 2002.



Squadron Leader Ron Mudge
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Squadron Leader Ron Mudge

6 Squadron Western Desert 1942 Hurricane IID Vickers 40mm Cannon fitter/armourer



Squadron Leader Geoff Murphy
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Squadron Leader Geoff Murphy

Geoff Murphy started flying with Aberdeen University Squadron as a 17 year old student in April 1941. He was called up in October and completed his flying training in Florida in August 1942. After staff piloting duties at a radio school, he was posted to fly Hurricanes in mid 1943 flying convoy patrols over the North Sea. Early in 1944 he converted to Typhoons and joined 245 Squadron in mid May 1944, just in time for D-Day. He had only fired four practice concrete head rockets before going on his first op. He stayed with 245 Squadron for the remainder of the war. He became a Flight Commander and was Mentioned in Despatches. At the end of hostilities in Europe, he had completed 141 operational sorties. After the war he stayed on in the Air Force, his duties including command of the first Jet Provost Squadron in the RAF. -- The slaughter in the Pocket continued up yo about 25th August with the lanes in the bocage country bordered by high banks being death traps to tanks, vehicles, men and horses which tried to move along them. The destruction and casualties were appalling and even from the air the stench of death was apparent from inside closed cockpits. As the noose tightened, it became clear that the one type of equipment which the Germans did not abandon in their headlong flight was their flak, as was evident from the casualties sustained. The ground attack pilots and the German flak gunners were constant daily adversaries throghout the campaign, since on every operation, in order to hit their targets, pilots had to dive into a cone of concentrated flak, remaining within it until their weapons were aimed and released and perhaps being most vulnerable when pulling out. We had armour plate at our backs underneath the cockpit, but the engine and flying control systems were unprotected and in a steep climb away from the target, as speed was rapidly reducing, it was advisable to turn the aircraft rapidly from side to side to spoil the gunners aim. Alternatively, keeping the aircraft very low and using the maximum speed attained at the bottom of the dive to get away from the target at roof-top height, made it very difficult for the gunners to keep their sights on the aircraft. This technique led, however, to the risk that when a climb to height to join up with the rest of the Squadron was eventually commenced, airspeed was lower and the rate of climb poorer, so that any other flak batteries within range in the area had a greater chance of hitting you.




Wing Commander Tom Neil DFC* AFC
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4 / 8 / 2002Ace : 14.00 Victories
Wing Commander Tom Neil DFC* AFC

Tom Neil was born on 14th July 1920 in Bootle, Lancashire. Tom Neil (also to become known in the RAF as 'Ginger') joined the RAFVR in October 1938 and began his flying training at 17 E and RFTS, Barton, Manchester. Tom Neil was called up on the 2nd os September 1939 being sent to 4 ITW, Bexhill in early November. On 1st December 1939, he was posted to 8 FTS and on completion of the course he was commissioned and posted to 249 Squadron in May 1940 flying Hurricanes just before the start of the Battle of Britain flying from North Weald. On 7th September 1940, Tom Neil encountered and claimed a Bf109 destroyed. On the 11th an He111, on the 15th two Bf109s and a Do17 destroyed and another Do17 shared, on the 18th an He111 damaged and on the 27th a Bf110 and a Ju88 destroyed, a Bf110 probably destroyed and a Ju88 shared. On 6th October Tom Neil shared a Do17, on the 25th claimed a Bf109 destroyed, on the 27th a Do17 probably destroyed, on the 28th a Ju88 shared and on 7th November a Ju87 and two Bf109s destroyed. He was awarded a DFC on 8 October, but on 7 November, after claiming 3 victories over the North Sea off the Essex coast, he collided in mid-air with Wing Commander Francis Beamish and his aircraft lost its tail. He baled out of his Hurricane unhurt, Beamish force-landing unscathed. Tom received a Bar to his DFC on 26 November, and on 13 December was promoted flight Commander. The squadron was posted to Malta in May 1941, flying off HMS Ark Royal on the 21st. During a summer of frequent scrambles, he claimed one further victory in June, while on 7th October he led a fighter-bomber attack on Gela station, Sicily. He departed the island in December 1941, returning to the UK via the Middle East, South and West Africa, and Canada, finally arriving in March 1942, when he became tactics officer with 81 Group. A spell as an instructor at 56 OTU, before being posted as a flying liaison officer with the 100th Fighter Wing of the US 9th Air Force in January 1944. He managed to get some flying in over France with this unit, claiming a share in 6 aircraft destroyed on the ground before D-Day, and a dozen or so more later, plus a number of other ground targets. In January 1945 he was sent to the school of Land/Air Warfare as an instructor. In March 1945 he was posted out to Burma, where he undertook some operations with 1 Wing, Indian Air Force, to gain experience of the operations in this area. Returning to the UK in April, he resumed instructing at the school until the end of the year. In January 1946 he attended the Empire Test Pilots School, undertaking No.4 short course and No.5 course, a total of 18 months. Posted briefly to Farnborough, he sought a move to Boscombe Down, where he stayed for some 3 years. In 1948 in went to Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio, to take part in the first high altitude pressure suit experiments, as a precursor to the aerospace programme. 1950-51 he was a staff officer at HQ, Fighter Command, while in 1952 he attended the staff college at Bracknell. He was then given command of 208 Squadron in Egypt, which he led until 1956, leaving just before the Suez operation. He returned to the UK to become W/Cdr Operations, Metropolitan sector, until 1958, when he attended the flying college at Manby. He went to the British Embassy in Washington for 3 years from 1959, returning to the Ministry of Defence but retiring from the service as a Wing Commander in 1964. Meanwhile he had added the US Bronze Star to his decorations in august 1947, and an AFC in January 1956.



Flying Officer Burt Newman
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Flying Officer Burt Newman

6 Squadron Hurricane ground attack Pilot 1944-1946




Squadron Leader Doug Nicholls DFC
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Squadron Leader Doug Nicholls DFC

A pre-war RAFVR pilot, in June 1940 Nicholls converted to Hurricanes at 7 OTU, Hawarden. Nicholls flew during the Battle of Britain with 85 and 242 and in September joined 151 Squadron.at Digby On September 30, 1940, he shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 and returned to Digby with his Hurricane P 5182 severely damaged by return fire. Nicholls spent only a brief time with 242 but Bader made a considerable impression. After a hard day Nicholls remembers Bader taking off his legs and dressing the stumps with lotion and talcum powder. Few people realise, Nicholls feels, just how much strain combat flying with artificial legs must have been. Later in the war Nicholls flew Hurricanes with 258 Squadron in the Far East to Seletar airfield, Singapore and flew their first operation on January 31 1942. On February 10 1942 the three surviving Hurricanes of 258 were withdrawn to Palembang with the fifteen surviving pilots, six remained behind to fly with 605 Squadron, with Nicholls being one of the nine evacuated from Java to Ceylon. 258 Squadron was reformed at Ratmalana on March 1 1942 and Nicholls rejoined it. Awarded the DFC (19.5.44) he remained with 258 until August 1944, when he was posted to HQ 224 Group, Burma, as Squadron Leader Tactics.



Flight Lieutenant Reginald C Nutter
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Flight Lieutenant Reginald C Nutter

257 Squadron, Canada, Hurricanes.




Wing Commander Geoffrey Page DSO OBE DFC
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3 / 8 / 2000Died : 3 / 8 / 2000
3 / 8 / 2000Ace : 12.50 Victories
Wing Commander Geoffrey Page DSO OBE DFC

Geoffrey Page was born in Boxmoor on 16th May 1920. Geoffrey Page developed an early interest in aviation, which is not surprising as he had an uncle who flew during the Great War and another uncle was Sir Frederick Handley Page, the great aircraft manufacturer. Page went to Dean Close School in Cheltenham, Glouscestershire, and later went to the Imperial College to study engineering. It was at college he joined the University Air Squadron at Northolt. Two weeks after the outbreak of the Second World War, Geoffrey Page received his call-up papers and joined the RAF with the rank of Acting Pilot Officer and went to Cranwell for advanced training. In May 1940 after a short period of instructing, Page was posted to 66 Squadron, flying Supermarine Spitfires but was almost immediately re-assigned to 56 Squadron where he was to fly the Hawker Hurricane. Whilst as a pilot officer with 56 squadron he took part in the Battles of France and Britain, and had accounted for three kills by the time he was shot down on the 12th August 1940 during the Battle of Britain. Flying behind his commanding officer, who was attacking a large formation of Dornier Do17 bombers, his Hurricane was hit and caught fire. Burning high-octane fuel sprayed into the cockpit, covering Page, resulting in very bad burns to his face and hands. Page parachuted out and his Hurricane crashed into the sea. After being picked up from the sea he was taken to the burns unit at Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, where he was treated by Sir Archibald MacIndoe, a pioneering plastic surgeon. He spent the next two years in hospital undergoing numerous plastic surgery operations. Both of his hands were burnt down to the bone, and his head had swollen to three times its normal size. Page had also received gunshot wounds to his legs. Page became a founding member of the Guinea Pig Club, where Sir Archibald MacIndoe was elected life time president and Geoffrey Page was its first chairman. In late 1942 he re-joined operations again as a Flight Lieutenant. He joined No.132 Squadron as a supernumerary Flight Lieutenant, before volunteering for service in North Africa, but returned to the UK as the desert heat caused problems on his skin grafts. In July 1943 he won his first DFC. Later in the year he joined 122 Squadron as a Flight Commander, before re-joining No.132 Squadron in January 1944 as Commanding Officer. On 29th April 1944 Page led his squadron to strafe Deelen airfield in Holland, and attacked a Bf110 night fighter that was landing. Despite the odds, the Bf110 shot down two Spitfires, before Page forced the aircraft down and destroyed it. The pilot of the Bf110 was the famous Major Hans-Joachim Jabs, who survived. Page was later promoted Wing Leader of 125 wing, and after another DFC he won the DSO at the end of 1944. Page had achieved his goal of 15 victories (10 solo, 5 shared, and 3 damaged). After the war on a tour of the United States met his wife to be, the daughter of a British Hollywood actor. He left the R.A.F. in 1948 joining Vickers Armstrong. In retirement, Page remained the driving force of the Guinea Pig Club, and also founded the Battle of Britain Trust. This raised more than one million pounds, with which the Battle of Britain memorial was erected overlooking the Straits of Dover. In 1995 he was created an Officer of the Order of the British Empire. Sadly Alan Geoffrey Page DSO, OBE, DFC and Bar died 3rd August 2000.

Geoffrey Page signing prints of - Combat Over Normandy - by Graeme Lothian.



Flight Lieutenant Charles Palliser DFC
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24 / 9 / 2011Died : 24 / 9 / 2011
24 / 9 / 2011Ace : 7.50 Victories
Flight Lieutenant Charles Palliser DFC

Born in West Hartlepool, Charles Palliser was educated at Brougham School and later attended a technical school. Joining the RAFVR at the outbreak of war in 1939, Charles Palliser was posted to No.3 ITW Hasting, moved to No.11 EFTS Perth on 5th December 1939 and in April 1940 went to No.6 FTS at RAF Little Rissington. Palliser converted to Hawker Hurricanes at No.6 OTU at RAF Sutton Bridge in July 1940 and joined No.17 Squadron at RAF Debden on 3rd August 1940 during the Battle of Britain. Palliser moved to RAF Tangmere with No.43 Squadron on 18th August 1940 and then to North Weald with 249 Squadron on 14th September 1940. On the 15th of September he claimed his first aerial victory. In April 1941 Palliser was commissioned and embarked with 249 Sqn on HMS Furious and on 10th May sailed for Gibraltar, and on arrival the squadron transferred to HMS Ark Royal. The squadron flew to Ta' Qali, Malta on 21st May 1941 to take part in the Battle of Malta. During that battle he claimed a further five victories, and on 27th November Palliser flew Gladiator Faith on a met flight. In January 1942 he was posted to 605 Squadron as flight commander. Palliser was awarded the DFC, which was gazetted on 30th January 1942. He left the island in February 1942 as one of the islands longest serving pilots and joined No.25 Air School at Standerton as flight commander, arriving in South Africa to take up the appointment on the 28th March 1942. Palliser was posted to No.62 CFS, Bloemfontein on 17th July, to 2 EFTS Randfontein on 19th October and then to 4 EFTS Benoni on 2nd September 1943. He returned to the UK and in October 1947 Palliser retired from the RAF, at the rank of Flight Lieutenant. Sadly, Charles Palliser died 24th September 2011.




Flt Lt Eric Parkin
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23 / 7 / 2008Died : 23 / 7 / 2008
Flt Lt Eric Parkin

After converting to Hurricanes, Parkin was posted to France to join 501 Squadron. In mid-June the squadron prepared to evacuate France. The squadron reassembled at Croydon on the 21st. In the late evening of July 31st 1940 the squadron took off from Hawkinge to return to Gravesend, but his aircraft had a starting problem and he took off late. Arriving at Gravesend in failing light he undershot the runway and touched coiled barbed wire on the boundary which caused the Hurricane to become inverted. Badly injured he was admitted to Gravesend Hospital, later transferred to Halton and did not rejoin 501 until February 5th 1941. With a non-operational category, he was posted away for an instructors course on April 16th 1941 and was instructing until the end of the war. Sadly, Eric Parkin passed away on 23rd July 2008.



Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC
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27 / 8 / 2003Died : 27 / 8 / 2003
Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC

Born 28th of June 1920, Peter Parrott joined the RAF in 1938, completing his fighter pilot training before joining No.607 Sqn in early 1940. On the 10th of May 1940, he destroyed two He111s and damaged a further two, sharing in another the next day. He was then posted to No.145 Sqn, damaging a Bf110 on May the 22nd and an He111 four days later, an action which saw his aircraft sufficiently damaged to force him to crash land in Kent. During the Battle of Britain, Peter Parrott destroyed a Me109, Ju87, Ju88 and damaged an He111, before being posted to No.605 Sqn in September. After baling out of his damaged Hurricane in December 1940 and remaining with 605 Sqn until summer 1941, he became an instructor. From July 1943 he joined a number of Squadrons in Italy, returning to Britain after the war to become a test pilot. He died 27th August 2003.




Sqn Ldr Hugh Parry
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Sqn Ldr Hugh Parry

Hugh Parry joined the RAF from Northern Rhodesia in December 1939, and after training in England was posted in February 1941 to join 260 Squadron flying Hurricanes. In April he transferred to 266 Squadron flying first Spitfires and then Typhoons. In March 1943 he went to Malta with 601 Squadron on the USS Wasp, flying the Spitfire Vc, where he remained until July. After a spell as a test pilot, he returned to combat with 41 Squadron flying Spitfire MkXIIs. On 24th September 1943 he was shot down near Beauvais and managed to evade capture for the next five months until he was eventually captured by the Gestapo in Paris. After a month in prison he was sent to Stalag Luft III until the end of the war.




Flt. Lt. Michael Penny
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Flt. Lt. Michael Penny

His war service began in October 1940 at I.TW. Newquay. On completion of his training he was posted to No. 24 E. F.T.S. Luton. After 11 hours dual flying he first flew solo in a Miles Magister. After forty hours instruction he was posted to No. 9 S.F.T.S. Hullavington for advanced flying on Miles Masters and Hurricanes. On completing this course he was presented with his Wings, having now flown 62 hours. His next posting was to No. 60 O.T.U. at East Fortune where he converted to B & P Defiants. The Defiant was a very unpleasant aircraft to fly, very heavy and I did not like the idea of becoming a night fighter in this aircraft said Michael. He was then posted to No. 153 Squadron in Northern Ireland; after only a few days the Squadron was disbanded and he was given a chance to convert to Beaufighters or stay on 'singles'. Michael requested training for Spitfires but was informed that there were no vacancies at that moment in time. He then asked if he could fly Lysanders being used to tow drogues. His request was granted and he flew Lysanders until January 1943 when his posting came through to 58 O.T.U. Grangemouth. He completed 50 hours on Spitfires and was posted to 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron 124 Airfield, Lasham. Michael recalls, Although we were operational, we were now in 2 nd T. A. F. and most of our flying was done in cooperation with the Army and Tank Cor. This involved continual very low flying and demanded very strict air flying discipline - this held me in good stead as time went on. In May 1943 the Squadron moved to 121 Airfield Fairlop where he flew his first operation over occupied Europe on a fighter sweep over Rouen, followed by an escort op. with Ventura bombers to Zeebruger; this was his first experience of enemy antiaircraft fire. Various escort and fighter sweeps followed. There followed a series of moves to various airfields in Sussex and Kent. In early 1944 the Squadron, then stationed at Ford, had bombs fitted to our aircraft for dropping on V1 launch sites. We began our dive at about 10,000 feet and released our bomb at 5000 feet - a most unpleasant experience. This brought us into range from all kinds of anti-aircraft fire, but fortunately we suffered very few direct hits, Michael recalls. After completing over 120 operations Michael was posted tour expired by the Air Comm. and went on to become a Spitfire flying instructor. He was demobilised in November 1945.




Flight Lieutenant James Pickering AFC
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Flight Lieutenant James Pickering AFC

Jim Pickering joined the RAFVR in 1937, and was attached to 769 Sqn FAA, then 804 Sqn FAA. In June 1940 he returned to the RAF and flew Spitfires with 64 Sqn during the Battle of Britain. With 418 Flight Jim flew Hurricanes to Malta from HMS Argus on 2nd August 1940. This flight was to reinforce Maltas handful of outdated Gladiators and few surviving Hurricanes, and on 16th August was amalgamated to become 261 Squadron. With this unit Jim flew Hurricanes and at least five operations in the legendary Gladiators, which have been immortalised as Faith, Hope, and Charity. In April 1941 Jim was posted, first to Egypt, then 80 Squadron in October 1942, and 145 Squadron in December. He returned to the UK in 1943. Born in 1915 in Hinckley, Leicestershire, England, James Pickering studied the printing business in Europe during the 1930s. Convinced that Hitler represented a threat which could lead to war, Pickering joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in 1937. As a week-end flyer he earned his wings as a Sergeant Pilot in April of 1939. In September of that year Pickerings unit was mobilized. He was sent to an attachment of the Fleet Air Arm, where he flew Gladiators, Skuas, and Rocs, following his carrier training. In June of 1940 Pickering returned to the RAF flying Spitfires with No. 64 Squadron based in Kenley during the Battle of Britain. Pickering was selected along with eleven other carrier-qualified pilots to fly Hurricanes to Malta off the deck of the HMS Argus. On arrival in Malta these new Hurricanes and their pilots were integrated with the 3 flyable Gladiators and 3 Hurricanes already there to form No. 261 Squadron. This unit carried on the defense of Malta against Italian and German bombing missions which were launched regularly from Sicily, only sixty miles distant. Because of his earlier experience with the Gladiator, Pickering flew both Gladiators and Hurricanes at Malta for eight months. It is believed that Pickering is the last living RAF pilot to fly the Gladiator at Malta. Following his assignment in Malta, Pickering joined No. 1 Aircraft Delivery Unit which ferried aircraft from the West African Gold Coast and Port Sudan to various points throughout the war theater of operations. Pickering delivered a P-40 Warhawk to the Flying Tigers which involved one of the first flights over the hump. In October of 1942 Pickering returned to operational flying with No. 80 Squadron (Hurricanes) at EI Alamein, and later with No. 145 Squadron (Spitfires). Having completed three separate operational tours, Pickering returned to England when victory was achieved in North Africa. In England, Pickering was assigned as a test pilot with No. 3501 Servicing Unit. He tested modifications to the Spitfire, and also test flew a number of P-51 Mustangs. Later he was transferred to No. 151 Repair Unit as its Chief Test Pilot. This was the largest unit of this kind in the RAF. Because of these experiences, Pickering is unusual in having flown eighty different types of aircraft during the War. Awarded the Air Force Cross, Pickering was released from the RAF at Wars end. He returned to his family-owned printing business, and spent his working career with the company, from which he retired in 1965. He also served as an outside Director of the largest Building Society in Britain. Pickering joined the Volunteer Reserve once again following the War, and continued to fly with the RAF until reaching the mandatory age limit of sixty. Pickering has had a private pilots license since 1938. He has flown thousands of hours and he is an expert on geological and archaeological research from the air. A Fellow of both the Geological Society and the Society of Antiquaries, Jim Pickering epitomizes the English character of determination and persistence which was so vastly underestimated by Hitler during WW 11.




Tony Pickering AFC
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Tony Pickering AFC

With the RAFVR just before the war commenced, Tony Pickering joined 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill in July 1940, flying Hurricanes, and in August 1940 to 501 Squadron at Gravesend. In September he was shot down in Hurricane P5200, but unhurt in a duel with an Me109, destroying another 109 a few weeks later. In December he joined 601 Squadron at Northolt. After a spell instructing, he joined 131 as a Flight Commander in February 1943, and later served as a Squadron Commander in the Middle East.



Group Captain Herbert M Pinfold
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19 / 10 / 2009Died : 19 / 10 / 2009
Group Captain Herbert M Pinfold

Group Captain Herbert Moreton Pinfold, Battle of Britian pilot with 56 Squadron flying Hurricanes, he also flew with 6, 64, 502 and 603 Squadrons. Sadly, Herbert Pinfold passed away on 19th October 2009. Group Captain Herbert Moreton Pinfold was born 5th February 1913 and joined the Royal Air Force in August 1934 at the age of 21. In September Herbert Pinfold was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand and with training completed, on the 5th of September he was sent to join 6 Squadron at Ismailia, Egypt. He returned to the UK on 19th March 1936 and joined the newly formed 64 Squadron. The squadron were flying Hawker Demons, and were moved to the Western Desert to combat the Italian Air Force threat. The squadron returned to the UK in September. After a short spell as personal assistant and pilot to AOC 11 Group, Herbert Pinfold was sent on a Flying Instructors Course at RAF Upavon. After completing the instructors course he was posted to 502 Squadron, AuxAF as Flying Instructor and Adjutant at RAF Aldergrove, Northern Ireland on 16th July 1938. In January 1939, Herbert Pinfold went to RAF Turnhouse, Edinburgh and joined 603 Squadron where the squadron were flying Gladiators and then Spitfires. He went to 3 FTS, South Cerney on 2nd July 1940, as an instructor. On the 11th of August Penfold went to Aston Down and converted to Hurricanes. Herbert Pinfold took command of 56 Squadron at North Weald on the 25th, remaining with it until 29th January 1941, after this he was posted to 10 FTS at Tern Hill when he returned to flying instruction with a posting to 10 FTS, Tern Hill. Herbert Pinfold completed the RAF Staff College course and went on a number fo staff positions in the UK and also overseas including Ceylon and Singapore. Coming back to the UK Herbert Pinfold took command of Duxford, at that time flying Meteors, after which was posted to the Air Ministry. In 1953 Herbert was appointed Air Attache in Rome, before returning to the UK in 1956 for a second spell as Station Commander of Duxford. On the 1st of October 1958 Herbet Pinfold retired at the rank of Group Captain. Sadly, Herbert Pinfold passed away on 19th October 2009.




Sql Ldr Al Pinner MBE
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Sql Ldr Al Pinner MBE

Officer Commanding, Hurricane of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight




Squadron Leader Mahinder Pujji DFC
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22 / 9 / 2010Died : 22 / 9 / 2010
Squadron Leader Mahinder Pujji DFC

In 1940 Mahinder, a qualified pilot flying for Shell in India, volunteered to join the RAF and was commissioned as Pilot Officer. Arriving in England, he was posted to 43 Squadron, and then 258 Squadron at Kenley, flying both Hurricanes and Spitfires. Later posted to the Western Desert, then to India, and finally to Burma, where he completed two tours against the Japanese. Sadly, Mahinder Pujji passed away on 22nd September 2010.

Mahinder Pujji wearing his medals.

Mahinder Pujji signing the print - Battle for the Skies over Dieppe - by Graeme Lothian



General Joseph Risso
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22 / 9 / 2010Ace : 11.00 Victories
General Joseph Risso

Escaping to England from Algeria, Joseph Risso joined the RAF in 1940. Flying Hurricanes with 253 squadron, he later took part in Turbin-light night fighter operations over the North Sea. In March 1943 Joseph Risso was one of the first batch of 14 pilots to take part inair operations over the Russian front with the first Normandie-Niemen Squadron. Only three of these first pilots survived the war. Joseph Risso flew over 600 missions and scored 11 victories. He was decorated by France and the Soviet Union.




Flight Lieutenant Douglas Robertson
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Flight Lieutenant Douglas Robertson

One of Robertsons strongest memories of Malta was taking Hurricanes on low level, night intruder raids on Sicily as a member of the Malta Night Fighter Unit which he joined from 249 Squadron in July 1941. These nuisance raids were intended to keep the German bombers on the ground. He had come out to Malta in April 1941, flying his Hurricane of the deck of HMS Ark Royal to join 261 Squadron initially at Takali, later transferring to 249 Squadron. In the Spring of 1942 Robertson was posted to the Aircraft Delivery Unit in Cairo.




Wing Commander Jack Rose CMG MBE DFC
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10 / 10 / 2009Died : 10 / 10 / 2009
Wing Commander Jack Rose CMG MBE DFC

Jack Rose was born on January 18 1917 at Blackheath, London, and was educated at Shooters Hill School before studying Science at University College London where he represented the university at rugby. He joined the RAF Volunteer Reserve in October 1938, completing his training as a fighter pilot just before the outbreak of war. With the British Expeditionary force under constant air attack, fighter reinforcements were requested and Jack Rose flew one of the Hurricanes sent to Merville to reinforce No.3 Squadron. He was in action immediately and on the 15th he shared in the destruction of a Messerschmitt Bf109 as the air battle reached its climax. For the next few days the Hurricane squadrons operated at maximum intensity. During the afternoon of the 18th Rose intercepted a lone Messerschmitt Bf110 fighter over Douai and shot it down. A few hours earlier, his elder brother Tommy, of No 56 Squadron, had been shot down and killed in his Hurricane. The following day Rose attacked a Heinkel 111 and closed to within a few yards to shoot the bombers port engine. Oil from the engine covered the windscreen of his Hurricane so he climbed away, slowed the aircraft down to almost stalling speed, loosened his harness, stood on his seat and leant out of the cockpit in an attempt to clean the windscreen. As he did, tracer from an enemy fighter hit his aircraft. Seeing Rose standing in the cockpit, the German pilot claimed he had shot down the Hurricane, but Rose managed to break away. His aircraft was badly damaged but he managed a forced landing at a forward airfield where the aircraft was destroyed. Orders were given to evacuate the Hurricanes on the 20th. Without an aircraft, Rose joined others on a French transport and was flown to England. In the 10 days of the air war, No 3 Squadron lost seven pilots killed with another taken prisoner. A further nine Hurricanes were lost. He formed the new 184 Squadron in 1942, initially on Hurricanes, later Spitfires. In late 1943 the squadron converted to rocket firing Typhoons, and were heavily involved in the build up to D-Day, moving to France in late 1944. He later transferred to the Far East, finishing the war with 3 victories. Leading the rocket-firing Hawker Typhoons of 184 Squadron, Jack Rose swept down on German armour concentrations south of Caen on D-Day, the first of many such sorties over Normandy Constantly on call during the battle, the squadrons targets ranged from enemy armour and convoys, to gun and mortar positions, bridges and railway targets. From June 14, they operated from Advanced Landing Grounds in France, with the enemy close enough to fire at them on landing and take-off. Rose joined his first squadron, No 32, at Biggin Hill flying Hurricanes. In the Battle for France he scored three victories before returning to England to take part in the Battle of Britain. In 1942 he formed 184 Squadron from scratch, leading it until October 1944. He later flew Hurricanes again in the Far East. He left the RAF in October 1945. Sadly, Jack Rose died on 10th October 2009.




Squadron Leader T.N. Rosser OBE DFC
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Squadron Leader T.N. Rosser OBE DFC

Squadron Leader T.N. Rosser OBE DFC volunteered for pilot training early in 1940. After training in England he was commissioned and flew with Spitfire and Hurricane squadrons in England and Bengal from August 1941 until December 1942, when he joined No 3 PRU (later redesignated 681 Squadron) in Calcutta for photographic reconnaissance operations in Japanes-occupied Burma, Thailand, and the Andaman Islands. (At that time the squadron was equipped with converted Hurricanes and North American B52s, and three PR Spitfires, the only Spitfires of any kind in India. A year or so later it had a full complement of Spitfire Mk XIs and 684 Squadron, equipped with Mosquitoes, had been formed). After his operational tour ended in July 1944, he commanded the PR training Flight in 74 OTU in Palestine until VE Day when the OTU was disbanded. He later formed and led a temporary squadron of Spitfire fighter/bombers based in Egypt for internal security duties in the Middle East. He was demobilised in late 1946 after administrative appointments in Air HQ Egypt, and at Cranwell.



Flight Lieutenant Anthony Russell
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Flight Lieutenant Anthony Russell

Anthony Russell joined the Royal Navy in 1938 but was discovered to be under age and discharged. He then joined the RAFVR and was called up to full-time service at the outbreak of war. After completing his training, on 28 September 1940 he was posted as a Sergeant to join 43 Squadron at Tangmere flying Hurricanes. He later flew with 145 Squadron, and was commissioned in April 1942. He remains the last surviving 43 Squadron Battle of Britain pilot to have flown with Tom Dalton-Morgan.



Pilot Officer Stefan Ryll
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Pilot Officer Stefan Ryll

Stefan Ryll went into operations with 306 Squadron flying both Hurricanes and Spitfires, and took part in the last raid of the war flying a P-51 Mustang on escort for the bombers flying to Berchtesgaden.




Group Captain Dave Seward AFC
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Group Captain Dave Seward AFC

Dave Seward flew RAF Meteors, Canberras and Javelins and USAF F-86, F-102 and F-106 fighters. In 1961, as C.O. of No.56 Sqn he led the 'Firebirds' Lightning aerobatic team and later Commanded the Lightning OCU and Battle of Britain Flight, flying the Lancaster, Hurricane and Spitfire.




Wing Commander Wilfred M Sizer DFC*
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22 / 12 / 2006Died : 22 / 12 / 2006
22 / 12 / 2006Ace : 7.00 Victories
Wing Commander Wilfred M Sizer DFC*

Born on 23rd February 1920, at the outbreak of war Bill Sizer was flying Hurricanes with 213 Squadron, after flying Guantlets with No.17 Squadron. The squadron flew to France in May 1940, where he scored his first victories, before being attacked by five Me109s and shot down. Rejoining his squadron soon after, he took part in the air battles over Dunkirk before again being shot down and escaping back to England. He flew throughout the Battle of Britain. Based at Exeter, on the 11th of August, he shot down a Ju88, and the next day he shot down a fighter escorting a large formation of bombers. As the attacks intensified, the pilots of 213 Sqn fle wup to four patrols a day. On the 15th of August he shot down two Ju87 Stukas. He also shared in the destruction of a Ju88 in October 1940, bringing it down over Beachy Head. He was awarded the DFC for scoring 7 and 5 shared victories. In April 1941 he was posted to join 1 Squadron, and then 91 Squadron. In April 1942 he joined 152 Squadron flying Spitfires, with whom he went to North Africa. In January 1943 he was given command of 93 Squadron and took part in the Sicily landings. While leading 93 Squadron he shot down two Italian fighters and damaged several others. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC. He finished the war with 7 and 5 shared victories. He died 22nd December 2006.



Flight Lieutenant Ron Smyth DFC AE
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Flight Lieutenant Ron Smyth DFC AE

Flight Lieutenant Ronald H Smyth joined the RAFVR in May 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up at the outbreak of war he was stationed at several different locations. With his course completed, Smyth had several short term postings, where eventually at 5 OTU, Aston Down, he converted to Hurricanes. Flight Lieutenant Smyth continued flying Hurricanes with 111 Squadron, 249 Squadron, and later with 615 Squadron. In May 1941 Smyth attended an instructors course and was commissioned in August. Later he was posted to No.1 Glider Training Squadron, a newly formed Development Unit. He qualified for his 2nd Class Air Navigators Licence while posted at the School of General Reconnaissance. Ronald H Smyth commanded the PRU in Gibraltar where he was awarded the DFC. He also ferried communications between London and Churchill at Biarritz and Atlee in Berlin for the Postdam Conference. Smyth was released from the RAF in January 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant.

Ron Smyth signing the print - London Guard - by Adrian Rigby




Vivian Snell
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21 / 2 / 2010Died : 21 / 2 / 2010
Vivian Snell

Battle of Britain Hurricane pilot with No.501 Sqn. Shot down over Cranbrook on 25th October 1940 while flying Hurricane P2903, bailing out uninjured. During his service life Vivian flew the Fairy Battle with 103 Squadron, later flying the Hawker Hurricane with 151 and 501(F) Squadrons during the Battle of Britain in 1940. Vivian shot down a Bf109E on the 25th October 1940 and was then shot down himself while piloting Hurricane Mk.I serial N2438. After having minor wounds attended to he returned to his squadron and flew through the rest of the Battle of Britain. In 1941 he was flying the American built Douglas DB7 Havoc night fighter with number 85(F) Squadron. He commanded his own Mosquito Squadron towards the end of the War. Vivian was released from the RAF in 1946 with the rank of Wing Commander.



John Jack Stafford
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by John Jack Stafford
21 / 2 / 2010Ace : 5.00 Victories
John Jack Stafford

Jack Stafford left New Zealand for the UK in 1943 and was assigned to Hurricanes with OTU at Annan before being posted to No.486 Squadron in November 1943 as a Sergeant Pilot. Based at Tangmere flying the Hawker Typhoon, No.486 Sqn was engaged in dive-bombing and ground attack operations over Europe in preparation for D-Day the following year. In April 1944 after a brief hiatus with de Havilland, Stafford returned to action and was credited with eight V-1s destroyed between 19th June and 29th August. He was promoted to Warrant Officer and commissioned the following month. Stafford was involved with covering the airborne invasion to capture the Arnhem and Nijmegan Bridges before the squadron moved to Grimbergen in Belgium. After No.486 Sqn moved to Volkel in Holland, Stafford and Flying Officer Bremner were credited with the first confirmed Me262 for the squadron on Christmas Day 1944. Jack was promoted to Flight Lieutenant in February 1945 and made Flight Commander of A Flight. On 12th April Stafford shot down and Fw190D-9 east of Ludwigslust, his last of the war. On 15th May he was posted to No.80 Sqn at Fassberg before moving to Copenhagen. His final tally was 2 confirmed kills, 3 shared and 8 V-1 rockets destroyed. Jack received the DFC and left the RNZAF in April of 1946.



Wing Commander Bob Stanford Tuck DSO DFC**
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5 / 5 / 1987Died : 5 / 5 / 1987
5 / 5 / 1987Ace : 29.00 Victories
Wing Commander Bob Stanford Tuck DSO DFC**

Bob Stanford Tuck was a flamboyant fighter pilot, his dashing good looks, courage, and success in the air coming to epitomise the young flyers who fought and won the Battle of Britain. To the British public he was a hero in the mould of the knights of old, and today his name is legend. In the early stages of the Battle of Britain Bob fought with 92 Squadron flying Spitfires, quickly becoming one of the leading aces. Promoted to command 257 Squadron, now flying Hurricanes, Bobs dashing style of leadership inspired his pilots to great success. He went on to command the Duxford and Biggin Hill Wings, taking his personal score to 29 air victories before being shot down by ground fire over Northern France in 1942. He died on 5th May 1987.




Len Stillwell
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6 / 12 / 2008Died : 6 / 12 / 2008
Len Stillwell

Len Stillwell trained in Southern Rhodesia and was posted to Italy with 92 Squadron flying Hurricanes. Later Len Stillwell went onto fly Mk.V , MK VIII and IX Spitfires with 92 squadron providing close ground support. He was wounded when enemy fire hit his aircraft injuring both his legs, but soon he rejoined the squadron. It was sad news to hear of his passing on the 6th December 2008.

Len Stillwell signing prints of - Fighter Pilot of the RAF - by Graeme Lothian.




H. E. Tappin
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8 / 1 / 2007Died : 8 / 1 / 2007
H. E. Tappin

Started flying, as an N.C.O. pilot, with the R.A.F.V.R. at No.3 E.& R.F.T.S. run by Air Service Training, at Hamble near Southampton.in April 1937. Awarded Pilot's Flying Badge (wings) in May 1938. Moved to 26 E.& R.F.T.S. run by Marshalls Flying School at Kidlington, near Oxford in September 1938. Flying Instructor's Course, November/December 1938 Started instructing 30th December 1938. School at-Kidlington closed on outbreak of hostilities, staff moved to 22 E.F.T.S. at Carpbridge. Instructed at Cambridge until April 1941, when posted to 52 O.T.U. (Hurricane) at Debden. Commissioned December 1940. 52 O.T.U. April/May 1941. Posted to 3 Squadron (Hurricane) at Martlesham Heath 2nd June 1941, became Flight Commander in March 1942. Posted to 534 Squadron (Turbinlite) as Hurricane Flight Commander September 1942. Tutbinlite Project abandoned February 1943,,posted to 157 Squadron (Mosquito) at Castle Camps. Became Flight Commander July 1943. Posted from 157 at Predannack, March 1944 to 51 O.T.U. at Cranfield and Twinwood Farm, near Bedford, as W/Cdr Flying. January 1945 posted to Mediterranean to command 108 Squadron (Beaufighter), to learn on arrival that the Squadron was to be disbanded. I spent a short period with 334 (Special Duties) Wing at Brindisi, in Southern Italy, and in March 1945 was posted to Command 256 Squaron (Mosquito) with the Desert Air Force at Forli, iii-Northern Italy. In September 1945 the Squadron moved to Egypt,, from where I returned home in December of that year. In February 1946 1 returned to Cambridge to continue my work with Marshalls as a civilian pilot, where the work was varied and interesting, covering flying-instruction, charter work and testflying on a variety of aircraft, including the Vampire, Venom, Canberra, Valiant, Viscount and Ambassador. I left Cambridge in January 1961 to instruct at The College of Air Training at Hamble, which had been set up by B.E.A. and B.O.A.C., (taking over the Air Service Training facilities) to train new pilots ?,rom scratch, as the supply of ex-service pilots was running short. It proved to be very successful. Retired from Hamble January 1972. Service Numbers: N.C.O. 740167. Commissioned Officer 89304. D.F.C. September 1942 Bar to D.F.C. April 1944. Died 8th January 2007.

H E Tappin signing the print - High Patrol - by Graeme Lothian

H E Tappin signing the print - Fighter Pilot of the RAF - by Graeme Lothian




Flight Lieutenant Alex Thom DFC
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Flight Lieutenant Alex Thom DFC

Born in Perth, Scotland, Alex Thom joined the RAFVR on June 24th 1939 and flew at the weekends at 11 EARFTS Perth. At the outbreak of World War Two, Thom was called up for full time service with the Royal Air Force and was posted to 3 ITW at Hastings on October 2nd 1939, moving to 15 EFTS at Redhill on April 29th 1940 and on June 15th moved again to 15 FTS, initially at Brize Norton and later to Chipping Norton. Alex Thom went to 6 OTU on September 29th at Sutton Bridge where he converted to Hawker Hurricanes and joined 79 squadron stationed at Pembury only for a short period when he was transferred to 87 Squadron on October 6th 1940, moving with the squadron on the 31st of October to their new base at Exeter. He achieved the rank of Pilot Officer on the 3rd of December 1941. During his time at Exeter he was also based on the Scilly Isles and on one occasion after shooting down an enemy bomber the crew bailed out over the sea. Alex Thom circled the downed German crew who were in a life raft until a motor launch came and picked them up. Thom would later meet the crew and was given a flying helmet by the German pilot, an item he still has today. Alex Thom was appointed B Flight commander on 10th July 1942 and was awarded the DFC on the 14th August 1942. At this time he was credited with two enemy aircraft destroyed and a probable He111. On the 19th of August 1942 while supporting the ground forces at Dieppe, his Hurricane (LK - M) was hit by ground fire and lost oil pressure. He managed to limp back to England where he made a forced landing at East Den. Thom managed to get back to his airfield as a passenger in a Master flown by Flt Sgt Lowe and immediately took off again in Hurricane (LK - A) back to Dieppe where he proceeded to strafe enemy positions. On the 1st of October 1942 he became F/O. In November 1942, 87 Squadron was transferred to North Africa. They were transported by ship to Gibraltar where the squadron flew sorties, and then onto North Africa. Thom was posted away from the squadron to be a flying control officer at Bone. He returned to 87 Squadron which was then based at Tongley and took command on June 27th 1943. He was again posted away from the squadron on September 27th returning to the UK with the Rank of Flight Lt. Thom became an instructor with 55 OTU at Annan on November 17th moving to Kirton in Linsay on March 12th 1944 to join 53 OTU. He was appointed Flight Commander Fighter Affiliation Flight at 84 (Bomber) OTU at Husbands Bosworth on May 19th 1944 and remained there until October 10th when he went to RAF Peterhead as Adjutant. His final posting was to HQ13 Group, Inverness on May 8th 1945 as a Staff Officer and retired from the RAF on December 4th 1945 as a Flight Lt.




Alexander Thom DFC signing some of our art prints in 2010.

Cranston Fine Arts offer our warmest thanks to Alexander Thom for taking the time to meet with us and add his signature to some of our artwork.


Citation for the Distinguished Flying Cross :

This officer has been engaged on operational flying for a long period, both by day and by night. Throughout he has displayed great keenness and devotion to duty. He has destroyed two enemy aircraft both of which he shot down after pursuing them out to sea for more than 50 miles. On one occasion, he engaged a Heinkel 111 in extremely hazardous flying weather and probably destroyed it. Recently, Pilot Officer Thom has completed several successful intruder operations. He has invariably displayed initiative and courage.


Flight Lieutenant ARF Thompson DFC
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9 / 3 / 2008Died : 9 / 3 / 2008
Flight Lieutenant ARF Thompson DFC

Anthony Robert Fletcher Thompson was born on October 14th 1920. He joined the RAFVR about July 1939 as an airman under training pilot. Called up on September 1st, he completed his training at 15 EFTS and 5 FTS Sealand and arrived at 6 OTU on September 10th 1940. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 85 (F) Squadron at Church Fenton on the 29th and moved to 249 (F) Squadron at North Weald in Essex on October 17th 1940. Thompson shared in the destruction of a Junkers Ju88 on October 28th and destroyed a Bf109 on the 30th. In May 1941 No.249 Squadron went to Malta and flew off of HMS Ark Royal in two groups on the 21st. On August 5th Tommy Thompson joined the Malta Night Fighting Defence Unit then formed at Ta Kali. He damaged an Italian BR20 at night on November 11th. The unit became 1435 (Night Fighter) Flight on December 23rd 1941. Thompson was posted to 71 OTU Gordons Tree, Sudan on March 3rd 1942. He returned to operations on October 1st joining 73 (F) Squadron in the Western Desert. In mid-November he was appointed A Flight Commander. At the end of December Thompson was posted to Cairo and in February he went to 206 Group as a test Pilot. He was awarded the DFC (23.03.43). On March 10th 1944 Thompson was seconded to BOAC and he took his release in Cairo on January 26th 1946 holding the rank of Flight Lieutenant. The following day he signed a contract with BOAC as a Captain. He retired from British Airways on October 14th 1975. Sadly, he died on 9th March 2008.




Captain Tommy Thompson DFC JP BOAC/BA
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9 / 3 / 2008Died : 9 / 3 / 2008
Captain Tommy Thompson DFC JP BOAC/BA

Anthony Robert Fletcher Thompson - Tommy Thompson was born on October 14th 1920. He joined the RAF VF about July 1939 as an airman under training pilot. Called up on September 1st, he completed his training at 15 EFTS and 5 FTS Sealand and arrived at 6 OTU on September 10th 1940. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 85 (F) Squadron at Church Fenton on the 29th and moved to 249 (F) Squadron at North Weald in Essex on October 17th 1940. Thompson shared in the destruction of a Junkers Ju88 on October 28th and destroyed a Bf109 on the 30th. In May 1941 249 Squadron went to Malta and flew off of HMS Ark Royal in two groups on the 21st. On August 5th Tommy Thompson joined the Malta Night Fighting Defence Unit then formed at Ta Kali. He damaged an Italian Br20 at night on November 11th. The unit became 1435 (Night Fighter) Flight on December 23rd 1941. Thompson was posted to 71 OTU Gordons Tree, Sudan on March 3rd 1942. He returned to operations on October 1st joining 73 (F) Squadron in the Western Desert. In mid-November he was appointed A Flight Commander. At the end of December Thompson was posted to Cairo and in February he went to 206 Group as a test Pilot. He was awarded the DFC (23.03.43). On March 10th 1944 Thompson was seconded to BOAC and he took his release in Cairo on January 26th 1946 holding the rank of Flight Lieutenant. The following day he signed a contract with BOAC as a Captain. He retired from British Airways on October 14th 1975. Tommy Thompson passed away on 9th March 2008.




Squadron Leader Laurence Thorogood DFC AE
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12 / 2005Died : 12 / 2005
Squadron Leader Laurence Thorogood DFC AE

Joining 87 Squadron on June 14th 1940, Laurence Thorogood was thrown straight into the Battle of Britain, destroying a Ju88 on 25th August. Commissioned in 1941 he then was posted to India and remained in the Far East until the end of the war. He served with No 9 Sqn Indian Air Force (Hurricane IIc) and 67 Sqn RAF (Spitfire VIII) in the campaign down the Arakan Coast. Staying in the RAF after the war, he served in Singapore and Sumatra with 155 Sqn before converting to Vampires on 130 Sqn, after two years instructing on Oxfords at Middle Wallop, we was Adjutant with 615 Sqn, Biggin Hill before moving to Germany in 1951 to fly Vampires with 118 and 94 Sqns. He served on the Thor missile system before finishing his career as a civilian in Whitehall. Sadly Laurence Thorogood passed away in December 2005. We would like to thank Dr John Thorogood for supplying the photo of his father.




Group Captain Peter Townsend CVO, DSO, DFC
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19 / 6 / 1995Died : 19 / 6 / 1995
Group Captain Peter Townsend CVO, DSO, DFC

Peter Townsend was one of the most inspirational fighter leaders of the Battle of Britain. In February 1940, flying a Hurricane, he had shot down the first German aircraft to fall on English soil in World War II, and this was the first of a string of successes for the popular commander of 85 Squadron. Shot down twice, wounded, and flying part of the Battle when he couldnt walk, Peter Townsend survived to lead the first night-fighter squadron. He later became Equerry to King George VI, a post he held for 8 years. He died 19th June 1995.



Squadron Leader John Urwin-Mann
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Squadron Leader John Urwin-Mann

A Canadian, John Urwin-Mann elisted in the RAF before the war. Flying Hurricanes with No.238 Sqn, he was awarded the DSO and DFC with Bar in his career with the RAF. DFC citation in the London Gazette, 26th November 1940 : This officer has displayed initiative and dash in his many engagements against the enemy. He has led his section in an excellent manner and has destroyed at least eight enemy aircraft. The bar to his DFC was gazetted on 7th April 1942. DSO citation in the London Gazette, 11th May 1943 : Within the past 6 months, whilst operating from Malta this officer has completed a large number of sorties, involving attacks on factories, warehouses, port installations, power stations and airfields in Sicily and nearby enemy islands. On one occasion he led a formation which attacked an airfield and destroyed many aircraft on the ground; Squadron Leader Urwin-Mann also obtained a hit on a petrol installation, causing a violent explosion and a large fire. Another of his successes was the destruction of a portion of the main railway line during a sortie at Gela in January, 1943. During the same operation, Squadron Leader Urwin-Mann engaged a Messerschmitt 210, shooting away its starboard engine. With his great skill and inspiring leadership this officer has raised his squadron to a high pitch of fighting efficiency.



Squadron Leader Bruce D Watson DFC
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Squadron Leader Bruce D Watson DFC

Joined the RAAF in December 1940. After initial training in Australia, gained his wings and graduated as a Pilot Officer in Canada. He sailed to the UK in 1941, then posted to 32 Sqn equipped with Hurricanes at Manston, gaining 2.5 victories. He then returned to Australia and joined 75 Sqn in June 1942. Flying Kittyhawks, Bruce took part in the Battle of Milne Bay as A Flight Commander and on 27th August 1942 he and Flg Off Peter Jones attacked 3 Val Dive Bombers over the Bay. They were credited with sharing 1 destroyed, 1 probable and 1 damaged. After serving at Milne Bay, he was posted to 2 OTU as an instructor. When Clive Caldwell formed 80 Fighter Wing RAAF in April 1944, he selected Watson to lead 457 Sqn. Bruce led the squadron from Darwin to, and operated from Morotai. Watsons Spitfire marked ZP-W was the first to wear the famed Grey Nurse scheme which the entire squadron adopted.




Group Captain George H Westlake DSO DFC
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18 / 1 / 2006Died : 18 / 1 / 2006
18 / 1 / 2006Ace : 11.00 Victories
Group Captain George H Westlake DSO DFC

Westlake was a student at the DeHavilland Aeronautical Technical School when he joined the RAFVR in September 1937. , George Westlake joined 43 Squadron at the height of the Battle of Britain. On 29th September he moved to 213 Squadron at Tangmere, and on 15th November shot down an Me109. In May of the following year the squadron flew their Hurricanes off HMS Furious to Malta bound for Egypt and was briefly attached to 80 Squadron during the Syrian campaign, where he had some further success. Returning to 213 Squadron he took temporary command in October 1942. In 1944 he led 239 Wing in Italy. when he was posted to 211 Group, later moving to 212 Group. He was involved with planning the invasion of Sicily and Italy and in early 1945 he was appointed Wing Leader of 239 Wing, awarded the DSO (22.6.45) .He finished the war with eleven victories. He died 18th January 2006.



Tony Whitehouse
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Tony Whitehouse

Wing Commander Sydney Anthony Hollingsworth Whitehouse, 501 Squadron, Bristol, Hurricanes.



Flying Officer Ken Wilkinson
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Flying Officer Ken Wilkinson

Battle of Britain pilot flying Hurricanes, he flew Spitfires with 611 Sqn and then 616 Sqn at Kirton-in-Lindsey and 19 Sqn at Fowlmere during 1940 and after a spell instructing returned to operations on Spitfires, with 234 and 165 Squadrons. After spending time with 53, 24 and 10 Operational Training Units, he left the RAF in November 1945 and served in the RAFVR.

Ken Wilkinson signing Night Reaper by David Pentland.

Ken Wilkinson sign Ground Force by Ivan Berryman.



Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM
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5 / 11 / 2007Died : 5 / 11 / 2007
Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, Officer Commanding 54(F) Sqn Vampire 1948-1949. Eric William Wright was born on September 21st 1919 at Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, and went to the Cambridge County School and the Technical College. Wright joined the RAF Volunteer Reserve in June 1939 and was called up when he had completed his training as a pilot. As a sergeant pilot Wright flew Hurricanes over south-east England during the Battle of Britain; Wright joined No 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron in July 1940, a few days before it left its Scottish base for Croydon. He saw a great deal of action during the summer of 1940, and in the early days of September he shared in the destruction of a Messerschmitt Bf 110 fighter and a Dornier 17 bomber. On September 15, the climax of the Battle, and a day commemorated as Battle of Britain Day, Wright shot down a Dornier 17 over Maidstone and by the end of the year he had accounted for six enemy aircraft, probably destroyed three more and damaged a further six. At the end of November he was awarded an immediate DFM. Wright was made a flight commander of No.232 Squadron in 1941 and went to India. After the Japanese attacks on Malaya the squadron embarked on the aircraft carrier Indomitable, flying off to Java at the end of January 1942 en route to reinforce the beleaguered squadrons at Singapore. Within a week Wright's CO had been killed and Wright was promoted to squadron leader. He damaged a Japanese bomber off the west coast of Singapore, but 232 was soon forced to evacuate to Sumatra. Wright was made CO of a composite squadron made up of the remaining Hurricanes. They were hopelessly outnumbered, and losses mounted. With only a few aircraft left, on March 1st 1942 Wright was ordered to pass his remaining Hurricanes to a group selected to stay behind and take his remaining pilots to Tjilatjap, on the south coast, from where they were to board a boat for Australia. Two Ford V8s were commandeered, and the party drove through the jungle at night, only to find that the last boat had been sunk. In vain they searched along the coast for other craft. A few days later the island fell to the Japanese, and Wright and his pilots were captured and spent more than three years in Japanese prison camps. After the war Wright was repatriated back to the UK via Guam and the US finally returning to England onboard the liner Queen Mary. Wright resumed his career as a fighter pilot flying the early jets and was a member of the RAFs official aerobatic team, No.247 Squadron, flying Vampires. In April 1948 he flew one of the six single-engine Vampire F3s of No.54 Squadron which made the first Atlantic crossing by jet aircraft. On returning back the the UK, Wright was appointed to command No 54. After spending a year at the Central Fighter Establishment Wright was appointed wing leader at Linton-on-Ouse with command of three fighter squadrons. In late 1956 he converted to the Hunter and took the Tangmere Wing to Cyprus for the Suez operations. He was then given command of the RAFs first Bloodhound ground-to-air missile squadron. In 1960 he was promoted to group captain and spent three years at Headquarters Fighter Command, where he was heavily involved in the introduction into service of the supersonic Lightning fighter. Wright was appointed CBE in 1964. He also received a Kings Commendation for Valuable Services in the Air and the Air Efficiency Award. Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM retired form the Royal Air Force in 1973. Sadly Air Commodore Ricky Wright passed away on the 5th of November 2007 aged 88.



Warrant Officer Kaz Yajima
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Warrant Officer Kaz Yajima

6 Squadron Hurricane ground attack Pilot 1944-1946


Squadrons for : Hurricane
A list of all squadrons from known to have used this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.1 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 13th May 1912

In Omnibus Princeps - First in all things

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No.1 Sqn RAF

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No.111 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1917

Adstantes - Standing by

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No.111 Sqn RAF

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No.113 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1917
Fate : Disbanded 10th July 1963

Velox et vindex - Swift to Vengeance

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No.113 Sqn RAF

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No.116 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1917
Fate : Disbanded 21st August 1958

Precision in defence

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No.116 Sqn RAF

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No.121 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st January 1918
Fate : Disbanded 29th September 1942
Eagle

For liberty

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No.121 Sqn RAF

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No.126 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st February 1918
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1946
Persian Gulf

Foremost in attack

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No.126 Sqn RAF

Flew Mustangs from December 1944.

No.133 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st March 1918
Fate : Disbanded 29th September 1942
Eagle

Let us to the battle

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No.133 Sqn RAF

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No.134 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st March 1918
Fate : Disbanded 26th June 1945

Per ardua volabimus - We shall fly through hardships

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No.134 Sqn RAF

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No.135 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 10th June 1945

Pennas ubique monstramus - We show our wings everywhere

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No.135 Sqn RAF

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No.136 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 8th May 1946

Nihil fortius - Nothing is stronger

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No.136 Sqn RAF

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No.137 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 26th August 1945

Do right, fear naught

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No.137 Sqn RAF

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No.145 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th May 1918
Fate : Disbanded 15th October 1957
Polish

Diu noctoque pugnamus - We fight by day and night

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No.145 Sqn RAF

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No.146 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th October 1941
Fate : Disbanded 30th June 1945

Percutit insidians pardus - The watchful panther strikes

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No.146 Sqn RAF

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No.151 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th June 1918
Fate : Disbanded September 1992

Foy pour devoir - Fidelity unto duty

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No.151 Sqn RAF

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No.164 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 6th April 1942
Fate : Disbanded 31st August 1946
Argentine British

Firmes Volamos - Firmly we fly

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No.164 Sqn RAF

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No.17 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st February 1915

Excellere contende - Strive to excel

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No.17 Sqn RAF

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No.174 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 3rd March 1942
Fate : Disbanded 20th April 1946
Mauritius

Attack

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No.174 Sqn RAF

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No.175 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 3rd March 1942
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1945

Stop at nothing

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No.175 Sqn RAF

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No.181 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 25th August 1942
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1945

Irruimus vastatum - We rush in and destroy

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No.181 Sqn RAF

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No.182 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 25th August 1942
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1945

Fearless I direct my flight

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No.182 Sqn RAF

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No.183 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st November 1942
Fate : Disbanded 15th November 1945
Gold Coast

Versatility

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No.183 Sqn RAF

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No.184 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1942
Fate : Disbanded 29th August 1945

Nihil impenetrabile - Nothing impenetrable

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No.184 Sqn RAF

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No.185 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 21st October 1918
Fate : Disbanded 1st May 1943

Ara fejn hu - Look where it is

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No.185 Sqn RAF

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No.186 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 31st December 1918
Fate : Disbanded 17th July 1945

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No.186 Sqn RAF

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No.20 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1915

Facta non verba - Deeds not words

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No.20 Sqn RAF

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No.208 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918

Vigilant

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No.208 Sqn RAF

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No.213 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th January 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1969

Irritatus lacessit crabro - The hornet attacks when roused

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No.213 Sqn RAF

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No.229 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 20th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 10th January 1945

Be bold

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No.229 Sqn RAF

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No.232 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 20th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 15th August 1946

Strike

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No.232 Sqn RAF

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No.238 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 20th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 4th October 1948

Ad finem - To the end

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No.238 Sqn RAF

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No.239 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 1st July 1945

Exploramus - We seek out

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No.239 Sqn RAF

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No.242 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1964
Canadian

Toujours pret - Always ready

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No.242 Sqn RAF

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No.245 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 18th April 1963
Northern Rhodesia

Fugo non fugio - I put to fight, I do not flee

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No.245 Sqn RAF

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No.247 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 20th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1963
China-British

Rise from the east

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No.247 Sqn RAF

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No.249 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 18th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 24th February 1969
Gold Coast

Pugnis et cacibus - With fist and heels

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No.249 Sqn RAF

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No.250 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 10th May 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th December 1946

Close to the sun

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No.250 Sqn RAF

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No.253 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th June 1918
Fate : Disbanded 1st September 1957
Hyderabad State

Come one, come all

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No.253 Sqn RAF

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No.257 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 18th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1963
Burma

Thay myay gyee shin shwe hti - Death or glory

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No.257 Sqn RAF

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No.258 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 25th July 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1945

In medias re - Into the middle of things

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No.258 Sqn RAF

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No.260 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 19th August 1945

Celer et fortis - Swift and strong

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No.260 Sqn RAF

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No.261 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 20th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 25th September 1945

Semper contendo - I strive continually

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No.261 Sqn RAF

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No.263 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 27th September 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th June 1963

Ex ungue leonem - From his claws one knows the lion

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No.263 Sqn RAF

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No.273 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st January 1946

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No.273 Sqn RAF

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No.274 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 7th September 1945

Supero - I oversome

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No.274 Sqn RAF

274 squadron was formed as a heavy bomber squadron at Bircham Newton in April 1918, and disbanded shortly after the Armistice. On 19th August 1940 it was reformed as a fighter squadron at Amriya with ten pilots from No.80 squadron and initially equipped with Hurricanes and Gladiators. The squadron was soon to become the first in the western desert to be fully equipped with Hurricanes. They became operational in September, destroying their first enemy aircraft (two SM79s) over Maaten Bagush on 10th September. Between December and February 1941, the squadron was employed on various duties including patrols, strafing Italian troops/transport and escort work. During February it was rested and some of its pilots ferried aircraft to Greece. In April they encountered German aircraft and were involved in the intense fighting over Tobruk. These operations continued until May, when they began strafing targets in Crete and providing cover for naval ships. Until March 1942 the squadron was involved in ground attack, protective patrols and bomber escorts. In May they began to receive the first Hurri-bombers, using them for the first time against enemy transport on 8th June 1942. There now began a period of intense activity including the battle of Alamein and more shipping patrols. This continued until the Autumn when the squadron was employed on coastal defence for the rest of 1942 and the majority of 1943. January 1944 saw a move to Italy and the beginning of a period of offensive sorties against enemy roads which continued until April. The squadron was then transferred to the UK and re-equipped with Mk IX Spitfires commencing fighter sweeps and bomber escorts until June, when it was transferred to anti V-1 patrols. In August, No.274 was re-equipped with the Hawker Tempest and commenced attacks against airfields on the continent, moving to Belgium in September. Throughout the winter it was involved on mainly armed reconnaissance patrols and had several combats with Me262 jet fighters - destroying one on the 11th February 1945. The squadron maintained its program of patrols and attacks against enemy airfields with great success, its last being on 4th May. Following VE Day (8th May 1945) No.274 Squadron moved into the Occupied Zone until September 1945 when they effectively disbanded by re-numbering as No.174 Squadron.

No.28 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th November 1915

Quicquid agas age - Whatwsoever you may do

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No.28 Sqn RAF

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No.286 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 17th November 1941
Fate : Disbanded 16th May 1945

Praesidia nostra exercemus - We exercise our defences

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No.286 Sqn RAF

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No.287 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 19th November 1941
Fate : Disbanded 15th June 1946

C'est en forgeant - Practice makes perfect

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No.287 Sqn RAF

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No.288 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 18th November 1941
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1957

Honour through deeds

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No.288 Sqn RAF

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No.289 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 17th November 1941
Fate : Disbanded 26th June 1945

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No.289 Sqn RAF

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No.29 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th November 1915

Impiger et acer - Energetic and keen

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No.29 Sqn RAF

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No.295 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 3rd August 1942
Fate : Disbanded 31st October 1948

In caelo auxilium - Aid from the skies,/i>

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No.295 Sqn RAF

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No.3 Sqn RAAF

Country : Australia

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No.3 Sqn RAAF

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No.3 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 13th May 1912

Tertius primus erit - The Third shall be first

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No.3 Sqn RAF

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No.30 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 24th March 1915

Ventre a terre - All out

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No.30 Sqn RAF

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No.303 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 22nd July 1940
Fate : Disbanded 11th November 1946
Polish - Kosciuszko

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No.303 Sqn RAF

Flew Mustangs from April 1945.

No.306 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 28th August 1940
Fate : Disbanded 6th January 1947
Polish - City of Torun

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No.306 Sqn RAF

Flew Mustangs from March 1944.

No.309 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th October 1940
Fate : Disbanded 6th January 1947
Polish - Land of Czerwien

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No.309 Sqn RAF

Flew Mustangs from October 1944.

No.310 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 10th July 1940
Fate : Disbanded 15th February 1946
Czech

We fight to rebuild

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No.310 Sqn RAF

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No.312 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 29th August 1940
Fate : Disbanded 15th February 1946
Czech

Non multi sed multa - Not many men but many deeds

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No.312 Sqn RAF

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No.316 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th February 1941
Fate : Disbanded 11th December 1946
Polish - City of Warsaw

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No.316 Sqn RAF

Flew Mustangs from April 1944.

No.317 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 19th February 1941
Fate : Disbanded 18th December 1946
Polish - City of Wilno

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No.317 Sqn RAF

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No.32 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th January 1916

Adeste comites - Rally round, comrades

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No.32 Sqn RAF

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No.33 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th January 1916

Loyalty

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No.33 Sqn RAF

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No.331 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 21st July 1947
Fate : Disbanded 21st November 1945
Norwegian

For Norge - For Norway

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No.331 Sqn RAF

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No.335 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 10th October 1941
Fate : Disbanded 31st July 1945
Greek

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No.335 Sqn RAF

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No.34 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th January 1916
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1967

Lupus vult, lupus volat - Wolf wishes, wolf flies

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No.34 Sqn RAF

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No.401 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 1st March 1941
Fate : Disbanded 10th July 1945
Ram

Mors cellerima hostibus - Very swift death to the enemy

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No.401 Sqn RCAF

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No.402 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 1st March 1941
Fate : Disbanded 24th July 1945
City of Winnipeg

We stand on guard

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No.402 Sqn RCAF

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No.42 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 26th February 1916

Fortiter in re - Bravely in action

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No.42 Sqn RAF

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No.43 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th April 1916

Gloria finis - Glory is the end

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No.43 Sqn RAF

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No.439 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 31st December 1943
Fate : Disbanded 26th August 1945

Fangs of death

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No.439 Sqn RCAF

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No.440 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 8th February 1944
Fate : Disbanded 26th August 1945
City of Ottawa

Ka Ganawaitah Saguenay - He who guards the Saguenay

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No.440 Sqn RCAF

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No.450 Sqn RAAF

Country : Australia
Founded : 16th February 1941
Fate : Disbanded 20th August 1945

Harass

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No.450 Sqn RAAF

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No.451 Sqn RAAF

Country : Australia
Founded : 25th February 1941
Fate : Disbanded 21st January 1946

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No.451 Sqn RAAF

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No.46 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 19th April 1916
Fate : Disbanded 31st August 1975.
Uganda

We rise to conquer

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No.46 Sqn RAF

No. 46 Squadron was formed on the 19th April 1916 and based at RAF Wyton base. In October 1916, 46 Squadron moved to France and was equipped with the two seater Nieuport. 46 Squadrons role was artillery spotting and reconnaissance until May 1917 when 46 squadron were re equipped with the fighter the Sopwith Pup. 46 Squadron operated as part of the 11th Army Wing, and saw many engagements with the enemy. Returning to England and based at Sutton's Farm, Essex, the squadron took part in the defence of London, in July 1917. London had been bombed several times by German Gotha Bombers but after 46 Squadrons patrols no enemy aircraft managed to bomb London in their area. Later 46 squadorn returned to France at the end of August 1917 and in November the squadorn was re equipped with the Sopwith Camel and participated in the Battle of Cambrai protecting the ground troops. In November 1917, Lieutenant (later Major) Donald Maclaren joined 46 Squadron. His first dogfight was not until February 1918, but in the last 9 months of the war Donald Maclaren was credited with shooting down 48 aeroplanes and six balloons, making him one of the top aces of World War I. By November 1918, 46 Squadron had claimed 184 air victories, creating 16 aces. After the First World War had ended the squadorn returned to England and was disbanded on the 31st of December 1919. The outbreak of war found 46 Squadron at RAF Digby, equipped with Hawker Hurricanes. Action with the enemy came quickly when, at the end of October 1939, Squadron Leader Barwell and Pilot Officer Plummer attacked a formation of 12 Heinkel 115s, destroying one each, and scattering the remainder. The next six months were uneventful, consisting in the main of providing air cover for the shipping convoys steaming along the East Coast - a few enemy aircraft were sighted but no contacts were made. In May 1940, the squadron was selected to form part of the Expeditionary Force in Norway, which had been invaded by the Germans on 9th April. The Hurricanes were embarked on HMS Glorious and, despite doubts that a Hurricane could take off from a carrier flight deck in a flat calm, they all took to the air without difficulty, thanks to the efforts of the ship's engineers, who managed to get the Glorious up to a speed of 30 knots. No.46 Squadron assembled at Bardufoss and began operation on 26 May. Patrols were maintained over the land and naval forces at Narvik without respite, some of the pilots going without sleep for more than 48 hours. Conditions on the ground were very basic with poor runways and primitive servicing and repair facilities. Many air combats took place, and in its brief campaign in Norway the squadron accounted for at least 14 enemy aircraft, besides probably destroying many others. On 7th June the squadron was ordered to evacuate Norway immediately and, on the night of 7th through 8th June, the Hurricanes were successfully flown back to Glorious — a dangerous procedure as none of the aircraft were fitted with deck arrester hooks. The ground parties embarked on HMS Vindictive and SS Monarch of Bermuda and reached the UK safely, but the squadron's aircraft and eight of its pilots were lost when Glorious was sunk by German warships on 9th June 1940. The two pilots who survived were the Squadron Commander, Squadron Leader (later Air Chief Marshal) Bing Cross, and the Flight Commander, Flight Lieutenant (later Air Commodore) Jamie Jameson.

No.486 Sqn RNZAF

Country : New Zealand
Founded : 3rd March 1942
Fate : Disbanded 7th September 1945

Hiwa hau Maka - Beware of the wild winds

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No.486 Sqn RNZAF

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No.501 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 14th June 1929
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of Gloucester, City of Bristol (Auxiliary)

Nil time - Fear nothing

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No.501 Sqn RAF

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No.504 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 26th March 1928
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of Nottingham (Auxiliary)

Vindicat in ventis - It avenges in the wind

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No.504 Sqn RAF

504 (County of Nottingham) Squadron Royal Auxiliary Air Force: 504 Squadron came into being on the 14th March 1926 based at Hucknell as part of the Special Reserve Squadron in the light bomber role. The squadron was equipped with Horsleys, Wallaces and Hinds before becoming a fighter squadron equipped with Gloster Gauntlets on 31st October 1938. By the beginning of World War II, 504 had been re-equipped with Hawker Hurricanes. The squadrons first victory was a Ju88 shot down over France on May 14th 1940 where it had been sent as a BEF reinforcement. After suffering heavy losses in France, 504 was sent back to Wick in the UK and began to build itself back to operational strength. On 5th September 1940 504 flew to Hendon and began intensive operations attacking German formations over London and the South East of England during the Battle of Britain. During 1941, 504 was re-equipped with Mk IIb Hurricanes and then divided. A flight joining No.81 squadron to go to Russian and a new 504 squadron being built up from B flight. 504 squadron saw action throughout World War II, taking part in offensive fighter sweeps over occupied Europe, escorting transport aircraft to Arnhem and bomber escort duties. During January 1945, six pilots were posted to Glosters for conversion to the Meteor, but the war ended in Europe before they could be used in combat. On 16th December 1947 King George VI gave permission for the use of the Royal prefix for all Auxiliary Air Force squadrons. On 12th February 1957 504 squadron Royal Auxiliary Air Force based at RAF Wyneswold was disbanded.

No.521 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1941.
Fate : Disbanded 1st April 1946

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No.521 Sqn RAF

521 Squadron was formed on the 1st August 1941 from No 1401 Flight at Bircham Newton, it continued to conduct meteorological reconnaissance duties. 521 Squadron flew Hudsons and Blenheims for North Sea patrol duties, Spitfires and Mosquitoes over Europe. It was disbanded when it was divided into Flights again, No's 1401 and 1409. But on the 1st September 1943 it was reformed in its previous role at Docking. 521 Squadron was re equipped with Hampdens, Hudsons and Gladiators, with Venturas arriving in December 1943. In August 1944 Hurricanes joined the Gladiators and Hudsons returned to replace the Venturas in September 1944. In December 1944 Flying Fortress IIs arrived for long range sorties and these were operated together with Mk IIIs from May 1945 until February 1946. Halifax Mk.III bombers replaced the Flying Fortresses in December 1945 and following the withdrawal of the Fortresses, 521 Squadorn was disbanded on 1st April 1946 at Chivenor.

No.527 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th June 1943
Fate : Disbanded 21st August 1958

Silently we serve

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No.527 Sqn RAF

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No.534 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 2nd September 1942
Fate : Disbanded 25th January 1943

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No.534 Sqn RAF

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No.56 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 9th June 1916
Punjab

Quid si coelum ruat - What if heaven falls

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No.56 Sqn RAF

56 Squadron was formed on 8th June 1916 and in April 1917 was posted to France as part of the Royal Flying Corps. 56 squadron was equipped with the new SE5 fighter. One of the major aerial combats of the squadron was the shooting down of Lt Werner Voss. By the end of the first world war 56 Squadron had scored 402 victories, and many famous fighter aces flew with 56 Squadron including James McCudden, Reginald Hoidge, Gerald Maxwell, Arthur Rhys-Davies, Geoffrey Hilton Bowman, Richard Mayberry, Leonard Monteagle Barlow, Cyril Crowe, Maurice Mealing, Albert Ball, Harold Walkerdine, William Roy Irwin, Eric Broadberry, Kenneth William Junor, Cecil Leiws, Keith Muspratt, Duncan Grinnell-Milne, William Spurret Fielding-Johnson, William Otway Boger, Charles Jeffs, and Harold Molyneux. The squadron lost 40 pilots during the first world war with another twenty wounded and thirty one taken prisoner. When world war two broke out on the 6th of September 1939, 56 Squadron was based at North Weald. 56 Squadron flew Hurricanes during the Battle of France and during the Battle of Britain. 56 Squadron claimed just over 100 enenmy aircraft shot down during 1940. In 1941 as part of the Duxford Wing it was the first squadron to be equipped with the new Hawker Typhoon and during 1942 and 1943 was based ay RAF Matlaske as part of No.12 Group. No 56 Squadron was the frist squadron to confirm a victory while flying the Hawker Typhoon. In 1944 56 Squadron moved to RAF Newchurch and was re equipped with the new Hawker Tempest V, becoming part of the No.150 Wing under the command of the Ace Wing Commander Roland Beamont. 56 Squadron's new role was to defend Britian against the V1 flying bombs, and the squadron shot down around 75 V1s. The squadron moved to Europe on the 28th of September 1944 to Grimbergen in Belgium as part fo 122 Wing of the Second Tactical Air Force. During this period to the end of the war 56 Squadron became joint top scorers with a total of 149 aircraft cliamed. Over its history the squadron flew, SE5's Sopwith Snipes, Gloster Grebes, Armstrong Whitworth Siskins, Bristol Bulldogs, Gloster Gauntlets, Gloster Gladiators, Harker Hurricanes, Hawker Typhoon, and Hawker Tempests. Battle of Honours of the Squadron are : Western front 1917 - 1918 , Arras, Ypres 1917, Cambrai 1917, Soome 1918, Amiens, Hindenburg Line. During World war two : France and the Low Countries 1940, Battle of Britian, Fortress Europe 1942 - 1944, Dieppe, France, Germany 1944 - 1945, Home Defence 1942 - 1945 and Arnhem.

No.567 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1943
Fate : Disbanded 15th June 1946

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No.567 Sqn RAF

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No.587 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1943
Fate : Disbanded 15th June 1946

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No.587 Sqn RAF

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No.6 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 21st January 1914

Oculi exercitus - The eyes of the army

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No.6 Sqn RAF

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No.60 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th May 1916

Per ardua ad aethera tendo - I strive through difficulties to the sky

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No.60 Sqn RAF

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No.601 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 14th October 1925
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of London (Auxiliary)

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No.601 Sqn RAF

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No.602 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th September 1925
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
City of Glasgow (Auxiliary)

Cave leonem cruciatum - Beware the tormented lion

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No.602 Sqn RAF

We have been informed by pilot Ian Blair about one of the aircraft of this squadron : The Spitfire MkVII had the Squadron markings of 312 Sqdn (DU-G) but the aircraft was on the strength of 602 Sqn. and was inherited by 602 Sqn from the Station Flight at Skae Bray, after 312 Sqn had left the area. The time span did not permit the ground personnel sufficient time to paint new letters on the aircraft. This fact has led to the incorrect assumption that I, the pilot of the aircraft, was a member of 312 Sqn.

No.605 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 5th October 1926
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of Warwick (Auxiliary)

Nunquam dormio - I never sleep

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No.605 Sqn RAF

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No.615 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st June 1937
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of Surrey (Auxiliary)

Conjunctis viribus

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No.615 Sqn RAF

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No.631 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1943
Fate : Disbanded 11th February 1949

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No.631 Sqn RAF

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No.66 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 24th June 1916
Fate : Disbanded 20th March 1969

Cavete praemonui - Beware, I have given warning

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No.66 Sqn RAF

Stations during the Battle of Britain : Coltishall from29th May 1940, Kenley 3rd September 1940, Gravesend 11th September 1940, West Malling 30th October 1940.

No.679 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1943
Fate : Disbanded 26th June 1945

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No.679 Sqn RAF

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No.680 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st February 1943
Fate : Disbanded 1st September 1946

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No.680 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.695 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1943
Fate : Disbanded 11th February 1949

We exercise the arms

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No.695 Sqn RAF

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No.71 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 27th March 1917
Fate : Disbanded 31st May 1957
Eagle

First from the eyries

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No.71 Sqn RAF

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No.73 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st July 1917
Fate : Disbanded 17th March 1969

Tutor et ultor - Protector and avenger

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No.73 Sqn RAF

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No.79 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1917
Fate : Disbanded (renumbered) 1st January 1962
Madras Presidency

Nil nobis obstare potest - Nothing can stop us

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No.79 Sqn RAF

Formed at Gosport on the 1st of August 1917, No.79 Squadron was moved to France in December 1917 and equipped with Dolphins which carried out fighter patrols and ground attack missions until the end of the war. After the Armistice 79 Squadron was stationed in Germany as part of the occupation forces, and on the 15 of July 1919, the squadron was disbanded.

79 Squadron was reformed on 22nd March 1937 at Biggin Hill, being formed from B Flight of No.32 Squadron. Initially the squadron was equipped with Gauntlets until the end of 1938 when they were replaced with Hawker Hurricanes. When World War Two broke out, 79 Squadrons role was to fly defensive patrols until May 1940 when 79 Squadron was sent to France for only a short period of 10 days. The Squadron took part in the Battle of Britain and after the Battle of Britain the squadron moved to South Wales until the end of 1941. 79 Squadron was sent to the Far East on 4th March 1942 arriving in India on 20th June. Between May 1944, and September 1944 No.79 was withdrawn from active service to be re-equipped with Thunderbolts and after the war the squadron was disbanded on 30th December 1945.

No.79 was reformed for a ten year period on 15th November 1951 at Gutersloh initially flying the Meteor jet fighter but being re-equipped with the new Swift and being used in the role of a fighter-reconnaissance unit. On the 1st of January No.79 squadron was renumbered 4 Squadron.

No.80 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1917
Fate : Disbanded 28th September 1960

Nil nobis obstare potest - Nothing can stop us

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No.80 Sqn RAF

80 Squadron was formed at Montrose on the 10th August 1917, and saw action in France, specialising in the ground attack role. Remaining in Belgium after the war, they moved to Egypt in May 1919 where it was renumbered 56 the following year. 80 squadron re-formed at Kenley on 8th March 1937, equipped with Gloster Gauntlets and Gladiators. Posted to Egypt in May 1938, the squadron joined No.33 to form a Gladiator Wing for defence of the Suez canal. When Italy entered the war, 80 squadron was stationed at Amriya equipped with Gladiators and one Hurricane. In November 1940, the squadron moved to Greece and in February 1941, the squadron equipped with a mixture of Gladiators and Hurricanes was used on bomber escort duties. In March the Germans came to the aid of their Italian Allies and on 24th March the squadron was evacuated to Crete and then to Palestine. In November 1941 they returned to the Western Desert to take part in the relief of Tobruk. During 1942-43, the squadron was on defence duties and convoy escort work over the Eastern Mediterranean. Posted to Italy in January 1944 and then onto the UK, they were re-equipped with Spitfires Mk IX. 80 Squadron then took part in bomber escorts, sweeps and armed reconnaissance. They began to re-equip with the Hawker Tempest, and were used for anti V1 operations. 80 Squadron was posted to the continent to support the Arnhem landings and roamed over Germany in the ground attack role. They remained in Germany as part of the occupation force until 1949. It was then sent to Hong Kong on air defence duties equipped with Spitfires and Hornets between 1949 and 1955. Disbanded in 1955, 80 Squadron reformed in Germany as a P R Squadron equipped with Canberras PR7. They finally disbanded in September 1969.

No.81 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th January 1917
Fate : Discarded 16th January 1970

Non solum nobis - Not for us alone

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No.81 Sqn RAF

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No.85 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1917
Fate : Disbanded 19th December 1975

Noctu diuque venamur - We hunt by day and night

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No.85 Sqn RAF

No. 85 Squadron was formed on the 1st of August 1917 at Uphaven. Shortly afterwards the squadron moved to Mousehold Heath nea Norwich under the command of Major R A Archer. The squadron transferred to Hounslow in November 1917 and in March 1918 received its new commander Major William Avery Bishop VC, DSO, MC. On 1st April 1918 No.85 Squadron was transferred into the new Royal Air Force and went to France in May1918 flying the Sopwith Dolphin and later SE5A's. 85 Squadron duties were fighter patrols and ground attack sorties over the western front until the end of the war. On 21st June 1918 Major Edward Mannock DSO MC became commanding officer. On the 26th July 1918 during a patrol with Lt DC Inglis over the front line Major Mannock failed to return and on the 18th of July 1919 Major Mannock was awarded a posthumous VC. No. 85 Squadron had 99 victories during their stint on the western front, returning to the UK in February 1919, and being disbanded on the 3rd of July 1919. 85 Squadron was reformed on June 1st, 1938, as part of A Flight of 87 Squadron based at RAF Debden commanded by Flight Lieutenant D E Turner. The squadron started training on the Gloster Gladiator until the 4th of September when Hawker Hurricanes were supplied. On the outbreak of World War Two the squadron moved to Boos as part of the Air Component of the BEF 60th Fighter Wing, and their Hurricanes were given the role to support the squadrons of Bristol Blenheims and Fairey Battles. By 1st November 85 Squadron's Hurricanes were moved to Lille Seclin. 85 Squadron scored its first victory of World War Two when Flight Lieutenant R.H.A. Lee attacked an He111 which crashed into the Channel, exploding on impact while on patrol over the Boulogne area. In May 1940, during the German advance, 85 Squadron were in combat constantly and over an 11 day period the squadron confirmed 90 enemy kills. When their operating airfields were overun the squadron's last remaining three Hurricanes returned to England. The squadron lost 17 pilots (two killed, six wounded and nine missing). During the Battle of Britian the squadron took part in the conflict over southern England and in October the Squadron moved to Yorkshire and were given the new role of night fighter patrols. 85 Squadron continued in the night fighter role for most of the war, with only a brief period as bomber support as part of 100 group.

No.87 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1917
Fate : Disbanded 3rd January 1961
United Provinces

Maximus me metuit - The most powerful fear me

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No.87 Sqn RAF

No. 87 Squadron was formed from a major part of D Squadron of the Central Flying School at Upavon on 1st September 1917. In April 1918, 87 Squadron was equipped with Dolphins when it was sent to France to fly in fighter and ground attack operations. This the squadron did to the end of the Great War, returning back to the UK in February 1919, and was disbanding on 24th June 1919.

87 Squadron was reformed on 15th March 1937 at Tangmere and was equipped with Hawker Furies until being re-equipped with the Gloster Gladiator in June when the squadron was based at Debden. In July 1938, 87 Squadron was again re-equipped with Hawker Hurricanes and with the outbreak of World War Two the squadron was moved to France as part of the Air Force supporting the British Expeditionary Force. 87 Squadron supplied air support to the troops on the Northern Front until their airfields were overrun by the German forces. The squadron was then moved to Yorkshire, moving again to south-west England in July for defence roles both day and night. The squadron was mainly used in a night fighter role during the Battle of Britain and remained mainly in that role until the end of 1942, while also beginning intruder missions in March 1941. The squadron was then moved to Gibraltar In November 1942 as part of the build up for the invasion of North Africa, remaining there until September 1943 when the squadron again moved to Sicily. In January 1944, the squadrons main role was to patrol over the Balkans form their base in Italy. In August 1944, the squadron returned to night duties performing fighter-bomber missions and in this role 87 squadron remained until the end of the war. On 30th December 1946, the squadron was disbanded.

No.87 reformed on 1st January 1952 at Wahn as a night-fighter squadron in Germany, initially operating the Meteor jet fighter but by the end of 1957 the Meteor was replaced with the Javelin until the squadron was finally disbanded in January 1961.


Pilots of 87 Sqn c.1941. Second from the right is P/O G. L. Roscoe.

Many thanks to Flight Lieutenant Alex Thom DFC who supplied this photo.

No.92 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1917
Fate : Disbanded 1st October 1994
East India

Aut pugna aut morere - Either fight or die

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No.92 Sqn RAF

92 Squadron was formed in the First World War, as a squadron of the Royal Flying Corps, on 1st September 1917. It flew Pups, Spads and SE5s during the war, becoming an RAF squadron on the formation of the RAF on 1st April 1918, before being disbanded on 7th August 1919. On the outbreak of hostilities of World War Two, 92 Sqn reformed on 10th October 1939, flying Blenheims before converting to Spitfires. It transferred to North Africa, and for some time flew as part of 244 Wing RAF. After the war, the squadron was disbanded on 30th December 1946. On 31st January 1947, the former 91 Squadron was redesignated 92 Squadron, flying the Meteor before re-equipping with the Sabre and then the Hunter. While flying the Hunter in 1960, the squadron was designated as the RAF's aerobatic squadron, with the name Blue Diamonds, a name the squadron carried on after tranferring to the Lightning. The squadron then re-equipped with Phantoms, before being disbanded on 1st July 1991. It was reformed from a rserve squadron on 23rd September 1992, and became No.92 (Reserve) Squadron, flying the Hawk aircraft before being disbanded once more on 1st October 1994.

No.94 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 30th July 1917
Fate : Disbanded 30th June 1963

Avenge

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No.94 Sqn RAF

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Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 20th November
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