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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL BATTLE OF BRITAIN PRINTS BY TITLE

Blenheim

The Bristol Blenheim, the most plentiful aircraft in the RAFs inventory when WWII began, was designed by Frank Barnwell, and when first flown in 1936 was unique with its all metal monoplane design incorporating a retractable undercarriage, wing flaps, metal props, and supercharged engines. A typical bomb load for a Blenheim was 1,000 pounds. In the early stages of the war Blenheims were used on many daylight bombing missions. On the day that war was declared on Germany, a Blenheim piloted by Flying Officer Andrew McPherson was the first British aircraft to cross the German coast and the following morning 15 Blenheims from three squadrons set off on one of the first bombing missions The Blenheim units operated throughout the battle, often taking heavy casualties, although they were never accorded the publicity of the fighter squadrons. The Blenheim units raided German occupied airfields throughout July to December 1940, both during daylight hours and at night. Although most of these raids were unproductive, there were some successes; on 1 August five out of 12 Blenheims sent to attack Haamstede and Evere (Brussels) were able to bomb, destroying or heavily damaging three Bf 109s of II./JG 27 and apparently killing a Staffelkapitän identified as Hauptmann Albrecht von Ankum-Frank. Two other 109s were claimed by Blenheim gunners. Another successful raid on Haamstede was made by a single Blenheim on 7 August which destroyed one 109 of 4./JG 54, heavily damaged another and caused lighter damage to four more. There were also some missions which produced an almost 100% casualty rate amongst the Blenheims. One such operation was mounted on 13 August 1940 against a Luftwaffe airfield near Aalborg in north-western Denmark by 12 aircraft of 82 Squadron. One Blenheim returned early (the pilot was later charged and due to appear before a court martial, but was killed on another operation); the other 11, which reached Denmark, were shot down, five by flak and six by Bf 109s. Blenheim-equipped units had been formed to carry out long-range strategic reconnaissance missions over Germany and German-occupied territories, as well as bombing operations. In this role, the Blenheims once again proved to be too slow and vulnerable against Luftwaffe fighters and they took constant casualties While great heroism was displayed by the air crews, tremendous losses were sustained during these missions. The Blenhiem was easy pickings at altitude for German Bf-109 fighters who quickly learned to attack from below. To protect the vulnerable bellies of the Blenheims many missions were shifted to low altitude, but this increased the aircrafts exposure to anti-aircraft fire. In the German night-bombing raid on London on 18 June 1940, Blenheims accounted for five German bombers, thus proving that they were better-suited for night fighting. In July, No. 600 Squadron, by then based at RAF Manston, had some of its Mk IFs equipped with AI Mk III radar. With this radar equipment, a Blenheim from the Fighter Interception Unit (FIU) at RAF Ford achieved the first success on the night of 2–3 July 1940, accounting for a Dornier Do 17 bomber. More successes came, and before long the Blenheim proved itself invaluable as a night fighter. One Blenheim pilot, Squadron Leader Arthur Scarf, was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for an attack on Singora, Thailand, on 9 December 1941. Another bomber of No. 60 Squadron RAF was credited with shooting down Lt Col Tateo Katō's Nakajima Ki-43 fighter and badly damaging two others in a single engagement on 22 May 1942, over the Bay of Bengal. Katō's death was a severe blow to the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force.
Blenheim Battle of Britain Aviation Art Prints, Paintings and Drawings
Aviation Art
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Bristol Blenheim by Tim Fisher.


Bristol Blenheim by Tim Fisher.

Item Code : DHM1221Bristol Blenheim by Tim Fisher. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints.
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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.
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Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints.
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Image size 20 inches x 14 inches (51cm x 36cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
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Fear Nothing by Anthony Saunders.


Fear Nothing by Anthony Saunders.

The Battle of Britian - 28th August 1940. The Battle of Britain is at its height but the threat of invasion is still a deadly reality. As the country waited, grim and expectant, for Hitlers Operation Sealion to be put into action, Blenheims of 105 Squadron make another strike against German troop barges assembling in the northern French port of Boulogne. Overhead, escorting Hurricanes of 501 Squadron engage in a savage tussle with Me109s of JG3 as the Luftwaffe pilots attempt to disperse the attacking British bombers. During the encounter three Me109s of JG3 were shot down for no British loss.
Item Code : DHM1906Fear Nothing by Anthony Saunders. - Editions Available
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 400 prints.
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Paper size 26.5 inches x 20 inches (68cm x 51cm) Image size 21.5 inches x 14 inches (54cm x 36cm) Clark, Terry
Pickering, Tony
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Paper size 26.5 inches x 20 inches (68cm x 51cm) Image size 21.5 inches x 14 inches (54cm x 36cm) Clark, Terry
Pickering, Tony
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PRINTLimited edition of 25 remarques
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Paper size 26.5 inches x 20 inches (68cm x 51cm) Image size 21.5 inches x 14 inches (54cm x 36cm) Clark, Terry
Pickering, Tony
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Merlin Chorus by Anthony Saunders. (AP)
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Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.


Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.

Royal Air Force Blenheim Mk.I aircraft of No.141 Squadron.
Item Code : B0291Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 35 prints.
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Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm) Gregory, Albert E
Morewood, Roger
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Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm) Gregory, Albert E
Morewood, Roger
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Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm) Gregory, Albert E
Morewood, Roger
Broom, Ivor (matted)
Cunningham, John (matted)
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Original pencil drawing by Ivan Berryman.
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Size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm) Morewood, Roger
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


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Tribute to the Blenheim Crews by Ivan Berryman.


Tribute to the Blenheim Crews by Ivan Berryman.

Blenheim IVs of No 21 Squadron, here being attacked by Adolf Gallands Bf 109 on 21st June 1940. Galland claimed two Blenheims and a Spitfire that day before he, too, was shot down by the defending Spitfires of 303 Sqn.
Item Code : B0287Tribute to the Blenheim Crews by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
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Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm) Brown, Eric Winkle
Morewood, Roger
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Top Aces for : Blenheim
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
John Randall Daniel Bob Braham29.00
John Cunningham20.00The signature of John Cunningham features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Robert A Karr6.00The signature of Robert A Karr features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Basil Gerald 'Stapme' Stapleton6.00The signature of Basil Gerald 'Stapme' Stapleton features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Signatures for : Blenheim
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Flight Lieutenant Benjamin Bent
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Benjamin Bent
Flight Lieutenant Benjamin Bent

Having joined the RAF in 1937, he flew with 25 Sqn as a Radar /Wireless Operator on Blenheims on night fighter duties throughout the Battle of Britain, assisting in five successful interceptions on his first tour. After a spell as an instructor, he reclassified a Navigator rejoining 25 Sqn on Beaufighters and then Mosquitoes, assisting in a total of eight victories including the first enemy aircraft shot down on D-Day.




Squadron Leader Ian Blair DFM
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader Ian Blair DFM
Squadron Leader Ian Blair DFM

Ian Blair joined 113 Squadron in 1938 as a AC1/Armourer AG. on Hawker Hind and later Blenheim Mk 1s. He took part in the heavy fighting of the first Lybian campaign. He was forced to take control and fly the Blenheim airceaft after his pilot was killed following an attack by an Italian Fiat CR 42. Remarkably he managed not only to evade the enemy aircraft, but fly to fly the Blenheim 350 miles back to his base where he made a succesful textbook landing. This extraordinary action earned him the award of an immediate DFM. The experience led him to train as a pilot at No 4 SFTS RAF Habbaniya, where the No 6 War Course were heavily engaged in operations to raize the siege of the base from the Iraqi Army. He was finally awarded his wings in May 1941. On return to the UK he served with 501 Squadron on combat duties on Spitfire Mk V's until injured as a result of enemy action. On return to flying duties he was posted to 602 Squadron flying MkV's and MkIX's until June 1944. In February 1944, he claimed a high altitude victory by destroying a Me.109 F at an altitude of 35,000 feet, flying a Spitfire Mk.VII H.F.

Ian Blair signing prints of - Returning From Caen - by Graeme Lothian.



Flight Lieutenant George Booth
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Flight Lieutenant George Booth

Sergeant George Booth, an observer with No.107 Squadron became the first British Prisoner of War when his Bristol Blenheim is shot down over the German coast on 4th September 1939.




Flt Lt Bertie Boulter DFC
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Flt Lt Bertie Boulter DFC

Joining the RAF in July 1941, Bertie completed pilot training in the USA before returning to the UK in 1942, joining Coastal Command flying Ansons and Blackburn Bothas, and instructing on the use of radar. Converting to Blenheims he joined 1655 Squadron at Warboys, and began training on Mosquitos. In early 1944 he was selected for the Pathfinders, joining 128 Squadron flying Mosquitos from Wyton, then becoming part of the Light Night Strike Force with 163 Squadron, completing almost 50 operations. In early 1945 he was posted to Canada to ferry back Mosquitos but the war ended.




Air Marshal Sir Ivor Broom KCB CBE DSO DFC AFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Air Marshal Sir Ivor Broom KCB CBE DSO DFC AFC

24 / 1 / 2003Died : 24 / 1 / 2003
Air Marshal Sir Ivor Broom KCB CBE DSO DFC AFC

Entering the RAF in 1940 he joined No 114 Squadron as a sergeant pilot flying Blenheims. After 12 operations he and his crew were allocated to No 105 Squadron and then No 107 Squadron, the last remaining Blenheim Squadron in Malta. The Squadron remained there without relief for five months carrying out low level attacks on the shipping. Very few of the original crews survived the detachment, in fact he was commissioned during this period, when 107 Squadron had lost all their officers and for a short time was the only officer, other than the CO, in the Squadron. At the end of this tour he was awarded the DFC. In early 1943 he became one of the first Mosquito instructors in the Pathfinder Force and later moved to No 571 Squadron with the Light Night Strike Force. He then formed No 163 Squadron as acting Wing Commander. He was awarded a bar to his DFC for a low level moonlight mining attack on the Dormund - Ems Canal from 50ft and then a second bar for getting a 4000lb bomb into the mouth of a railway tunnel during the final German Ardennes offensive. During his time on Mosquitoes his navigator was Tommy Broom, together they formed an inseparable combination. Remaining with the RAF after WWII and in accordance with peacetime rules for a much smaller Air Force he was reduced in rank first to Squadron Leader and then to Flight Lieutenant in 1948. Promoted to Air Marshal in 1974 he became the Head of the UK National Air Traffic Services and was the first serving officer to be appointed to the Board of the Civil Aviation Authority. Retiring from the RAF in 1979 he has been actively engaged in civil aviation since then. He died 24th January 2003.




Squadron Leader TJ Tommy Broom DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader TJ Tommy Broom DFC

18 / 5 / 2010Died : 18 / 5 / 2010
Squadron Leader TJ Tommy Broom DFC

Thomas John Broom was born on January 22 1914 at Portishead, Bristol, and educated at Slade Road School, leaving when he was 14 to work as a garage hand. As soon as he reached his 18th birthday he enlisted in the RAF and trained as an armourer. He served in the Middle East, initially in Sudan, and in 1937 was sent to Palestine to join No 6 Squadron. With the threat of war in Europe, however, there was an urgent need for more air observers; Broom volunteered and returned to Britain for training. In February 1939 he joined No 105 Squadron at Harwell, which was equipped with the Fairey Battle. On the day the Second World War broke out No 105 flew to Reims in northern France to support the British Expeditionary Force, and within three weeks Broom had flown his first reconnaissance over Germany. During a raid on Cologne in November 1940 his aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire, but the crew managed to struggle back to England where they were forced to bail out as they ran out of fuel. For the next 12 months Broom served as an instructor. He returned to his squadron in January 1942, just as the Mosquito entered service, and on August 25 was sent to attack a power station near Cologne. As the aircraft flew at treetop height across Belgium, the crew spotted an electricity pylon. The pilot tried to avoid it but the starboard engine struck the top of the pylon and the aircraft ploughed into pine trees. Both men survived the crash, and were picked up by members of the Belgian Resistance. They were escorted to St Jean de Luz by the Belgian-run Comet escape line, and Broom crossed the mountains under the aegis of a Spanish Basque guide on September 8; his pilot followed him two weeks later. Twenty-five years after the event Broom returned to St Jean de Luz to meet the woman who had sheltered him from the Germans. After the German advance into the Low Countries on May 10 1940, the Battle squadrons were thrown against Panzers and attacked the crucial bridges across the main rivers, suffering terrible losses. After the fall of France, Broom and some of his comrades managed to reach Cherbourg to board a ship for England. No 105 Squadron was re-equipped with the Blenheim, and during the Battle of Britain Broom attacked the German barges assembling at the Channel ports in preparation for an invasion of England. After spending a period as an instructor at 13 OTU he rejoined 105 Squadron on Mosquitoes, they were in fact the first squadron in the RAF to receive them. Through early 1942 he was navigator on many of the daylight raids carried out by 105 Squadron. In August 1943 Tommy Broom was the chief ground instructor at the Mosquito Training Unit when he first met his namesake Flight Lieutenant Ivor Broom (later Air Marshal Sir Ivor Broom), an experienced low-level bomber pilot. They immediately teamed up and flew together for the remainder of the war, in 163 Squadron as part of the Light Night Strike Force forming a formidable on Mosquitoes including the low level attack on the Dortmund - Ems Canal and completing 58 operations together, including 22 to Berlin. Known as The Flying Brooms Initially they joined No 571 Squadron as part of Air Vice-Marshal Don Bennetts Pathfinder Force, and on May 26 1944 they flew their first operation, an attack on Ludswigshafen. On August 9 they took part in a spectacular night-time mission to drop mines in the Dortmund-Ems Canal. They descended rapidly from 25,000ft to fly along the canal at 150ft, releasing their mines under heavy anti-aircraft fire. The force of eight Mosquitos closed the canal for a number of weeks. Tommy Brooms brilliant navigation had helped ensure the success of the raid, and he was awarded a DFC. The Brooms took part in another daring attack on New Years Day 1945. In order to stem the flow of German reinforcements to the Ardennes, the RAF mounted operations to sever the rail links leading to the area, and the Brooms were sent to block the tunnel at Kaiserslauten. They were approaching the tunnel at low level just as a train was entering it. They dropped their 4,000lb bomb, with a time delay fuse, in the entrance and 11 seconds later it exploded, completely blocking the tunnel – the train did not emerge. Tommy Broom received a Bar to his DFC and his pilot was awarded a DSO. When Ivor Broom was given command of No 163 Squadron, Tommy went with him as the squadrons navigation leader and they flew together until the end of the war. Their last five operations were to Berlin, where searchlights posed a perpetual problem. On one occasion they were coned for as long as a quarter of an hour. After twisting, turning and diving to escape the glare, Ivor Broom asked his disoriented navigator for a course to base. Tommy replied: Fly north with a dash of west, while I sort myself out. A few weeks later Tommy Broom was awarded a second Bar to his DFC – an extremely rare honour for a bomber navigator. Tommy Broom left the RAF in September 1945, but he and his pilot remained close friends until Sir Ivors death in 2003. Sadly Tommy Broom passed away on 18th May 2010



Flight Lieutenant Owen V Burns
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Owen V Burns
Flight Lieutenant Owen V Burns

Owen Burns was a Wirelss Operator and ir Gunner on Blenheims with 235 Sqn in May 1940, and flew during the Battle of Britain. In 1941 was injured when the aircraft he was on crash landed, killing the observer.Owen Burns went onto join 279 Sqn on Hudsons carrying out Air Sea Rescues



Flight Lieutenant Joseph P R Chamberlin
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Joseph P R Chamberlin
Flight Lieutenant Joseph P R Chamberlin

Joining the RAFVR in June 1939 he was then called up at the Outbreak of war. He flew Blenheims with No.235 Sqn during the Battle of Britain before being seriously injured in a crash and spending eight months in hospital.




Group Captain John Cunningham CBE DSO DFC AE DL FRAeS
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Group Captain John Cunningham CBE DSO DFC AE DL FRAeS

21 / 7 / 2002Died : 21 / 7 / 2002
21 / 7 / 2002Ace : 20.00 Victories
Group Captain John Cunningham CBE DSO DFC AE DL FRAeS

John Cunningham joined the RAF in 1935 with 604 Squadron. At the outbreak of World War Two he was based at North Weald flying Blenheims on day escort and night fighter operations. In September 1940 he converted onto Beaufighters equipped with radar, the first aircraft that made night fighting really possible. In November he had the Squadrons first successful night combat. He took command of 604 Squadron in August 1941. After a period at HQ81 Group, he was posted on his second tour to command 85 Squadron equipped with Mosquitoes. In March 1944 with 19 night and 1 day victory he was posted to HQ11 Group to look after night operations. The most famous Allied night fighter Ace of WWII - 20 victories. He died 21st July 2002. Born in 1917, Group Captain John Cunningham was the top-scoring night fighter ace of the Royal Air Force. Cunningham joined the RAF in 1935 as a Pilot Officer. He learned to fly in the Avro 504N and was awarded his wings in 1936. While assigned to the Middlesex Squadron Auxiliary based at Hendon, Cunningham received instruction in the Hawker Hart prior to moving on the Hawker Demon. The Demon was a two-seat day and night fighter. Cunningharns squadron was mobilized in 1938 following the Czechoslovak crisis. His No. 604 unit was moved to North Weald. Later in 1938 his unit returned to Hendon and was reequipped with the more modern Blenheim 1 fighter. In August of 1939 the unit was again mobilized and returned to North Weald. The Squadron was primarily utilized to provide daylight air cover for convoys. Lacking radar the Blenheim was relatively useless as a night fighter. In September of 1940 the unit was moved to Middle Wallop and the first Bristol Beaufighters arrived. The Beatifighter had a modestly effective, although often unreliable radar. It was an excellent aircraft with reliable air-cooled engines and four 20mm cannons. Cunningham attained the units first night victory in the Beaufighter, and his tally rose steadily. He was promoted to Wing Commander of 604 Squadron in August of 1941. Cunningham completed his first combat tour of duty in mid-1942 with a total of 15 victories. He was then posted to H.Q. 81 Group, which was an operational training group under the Fighter Command. In January of 1943 Cunningham was transferred to command of No. 85 Squadron which was equipped with the Mosquito. With the higher speed of the Mosquito, Cunningham was successful at downing Fw-190s, something impossible in the slower Beaufighter. Cunningham completed his second tour in 1944 with a total of nineteen victories at night and one by day. He was promoted to Group Captain at that time, and was assigned to H.Q. 11 Group. Cunninghams radar operator Sqd. Ldr. Jimmy Rawnsley participated in most of Cunninghams victories. The 604 Squadron was disbanded in 1945, but in 1946 Cunningham was given the honor of reforming the Squadron at Hendon - flying the Spitfire. Cunningham left the RAF in 1946 and joined the De Havilland Aircraft Co. at Hatfield as its Chief Test Pilot. Cunningham had a long and distinguished career in the British aviation industry, retiring from British Aerospace in 1980. Cunningham was appointed OBE in 1951 and CBE in 1963. He was awarded the DSO in 1941 and Bars in 1942 and 1944; the DFC and Bar in 1941, also the Air Efficiency Award (AE). He also held the Soviet Order of Patriotic War 1st Class and the US Silver Star. Group Capt John Cunningham died at the age of 84 on the 21st July 2002.



Miss Lettice Curtis
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Miss Lettice Curtis

Joined the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in July 1940 having been taken on to ferry Tiger Moths. Although we were later allowed to ferry other training types such as Oxfords and Masters, it was not until the autumn of 1941 that women were allowed to fly operational aircraft types. I flew my first Hurricane in August 1941 and my first Spitfire a couple of weeks later. After a brief course on a Blenheim I was cleared to fly without any further training, twin-engine bombers up to the Wellington. In November 1943 I was sent on a Halifax course, which due to unserviceability and bad weather closed, restarting in February 1943 at Pocklington where I was cleared for ferrying Halifaxes. After that without further training, I ferried Lancasters and over 100 Stirlings. In November 1945 I ferried 14 Liberators.



Flight Lieutenant Allan Davies MID
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Flight Lieutenant Allan Davies MID

Joined RAAF in October 1940, served in Iraq and Egypt on Blenheims, then Baltimores, before being posted back to Australia in June 1944. He flew Beauforts and Mosquitoes at 5 OTU. then posted to 97 Sqn at Coomalie Creek NT completing 17 PRU missions over Borneo. His aircraft PR Mosquito Mk XVI A52-600 is being restored to flying condition by the RAAF at Richmond Airbase outside Sydney.



Squadron Leader Stanley S Duff
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Squadron Leader Stanley S Duff

Flew Blenheims with 23 Squadron.



Sergeant Herbert Luiz Flower
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Sergeant Herbert Luiz Flower

Initially joining the RAF as a boy entrant Wireless Operator in 1937 he later trained as an Air Gunner and joined 248 Sqn in July 1940, flying Blenheims during the Battle of Britain. After 126 sorties with Coastal Command he transferred to West African Communication Command, completing a nine year engagement, then joined 27 Sqn as a master signaller and took part in 103 sorties during the Berlin Airlift.



Squadron Leader Alfie Fripp
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Squadron Leader Alfie Fripp

An Observer with 57 Squadron, he was one of the first aircrew to be taken captive during WWII when his Blenheim was downed on 13th October 1939. His Commanding Officer at the time, Harry Wings Day, was shot down just a few days before and went on to play a leading role in the Great Escape. Enduring over 5 years of captivity, he finally walked to his freedom in the Long March of 1945. – in luft 3 he was responsible for rationing the red cross parcels which he collcted from the train station – bribed polish workers who made maps of the area - entered the camp to ensure the escapees had food once free



Squadron Leader Pat Fry DFC
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Squadron Leader Pat Fry DFC

Commanding Officer of No.236 Squadron. Flew Beaufighters with the North Coates Strike Wing.



Group Captain A K Gatward DSO, DFC, AE
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Group Captain A K Gatward DSO, DFC, AE

A pre-war RAFVR pilot, Gatward completed his first tour of operations in 1940-41 with 53 Squadron Bomber Command, flying Blenheims. His second tour was to take him into Coastal Command, on Beaufighters, and considerable fame. Gatward and his navigator, Sergeant George Fern, now of 236 Squadron, were selected for a special mission. Shortly before midday on 12th June 1942, they left Thorney Island and set course for Paris where their brief was to beat up the routine daily parade of German occupation troops along the Champs Elysees, dropping two French national flags at the same time. Achieving their objective and strafing the German Maritime HQ in Paris on the way out, they returned home without incident and shortly afterwards Gatward completed his second tour, receiving a DFC for his Paris sortie. In June 1943 he began a third tour as a Flight Commander of the famous No.404 Buffalo Squadron RCAF at Wick, again piloting Beaufighters. Afters 404s CO was lost in action, Gatward took over the Squadron, ending the war with a bar to his DFC and a DSO.



Flight Lieutenant Herbert Bert Graham
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Flight Lieutenant Herbert Bert Graham

Bert Graham joined the RAF in 1941 and was immediately posted to a pilot training station in Torquay, Devon. After passing his final exams he then went on to fly Tiger Moths, before being posted to RAF Brize Norton flying Oxfords. In 1942 Bert transferred to start flying with 143 Squadron on Blenheims, but quickly moved on to Beaufighters with the North Coates Strike Wing. For his second tour Bert was posted to Scotland flying Mosquitos, where, before the end of hostilities, he completed many port and shipping strikes over Norway and occupied Europe.



Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC
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12 / 11 / 2010Died : 12 / 11 / 2010
Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC

Albert Gregory was born in Derby on 9th May 1917. Gregory joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in April 1939 as an Airman u/t Wop/Air Gunner. Called up on 1st September and posted to Aldegrove in October to commence Air Gunnery training in December 1939, Albert joined 141 Squadron at Grangemouth as an Air Gunner flying in Blenheims before the squadron converted to Defiants. He could not fly in the Defiant because he was too tall for the turret, so transferred to 219 squadron based at Catterick in May 1940 with whom he served throughout the Battle of Britain on Beaufighters. In September 1940 the introduction of Radar equipped Beaufighters meant Albert Gregory retrained as a Radio Observer and in March 1941 his aircraft accounted for the destruction of a He111. In May 1941, he went to no 2 Radio School at Yatesbury for a Wireless Operators course and passed out from this in September 1941. Albert then served with 23 Sqn in Boston IIIs on intruder patrols over occupied France, Belgium and Holland on bombing and strafing missions, before spending time with 275 and 278 (ASR) Squadrons. On 2nd April 1942 he damaged two Do 17s and in July 1942, Albert Gregory was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and was commissioned in August 1942. Albert later served with 278 (ASR) squadron and was released from the RAF in November 1945 with the rank of Flight Lieutenant. In July 1947 Albert Gregory rejoined the RAF and in February 1948 he was posted to 52 Squadron at Changi, Singapore. The squadron was engaged in Army support supply dropping and troop carrying in the anti-terrorist campaign in Malaya. In 1950 following his return to Britain, Albert became a signals instructor and retired from the RAF in May 1955. Sadly, he passed away on 12th November 2010.



Group Captain Richard Haine OBE DFC
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30 / 9 / 2008Died : 30 / 9 / 2008
Group Captain Richard Haine OBE DFC

Richard Dickie Haine was born in St Stephens in October 1916. In 1936, he qualified as an RAF pilot, and flew the Hawker Fury with No.25 Sqn, which re-equipped with Bristol Blenheims prior to the outbreak of war. In February 1940, he transferred to No.600 Sqn. Shortly afterwards, he piloted one of six Blenheims tasked with attacking an airfield where Ju52 transport aircraft and their cargo of paratroops were reported to be landing during the Blitzkrieg on Holland. During this action he was shot down and crash landed, escaping back to Britain on the destroyer HMS Hereward, the destroyer which evacuated Queen Wilhelmina and her government. He was awarded the DFC for his actions over Holland that day. On his return to England, he flew night patrols on Blenheims, Defiants and Beaufighters, but rarely intercepted any aircraft due to poor radar. In January 1944 he took the post of Commanding Officer of No.488 Sqn flying Mosquitoes. With this squadron he flew beachhead patrols on D-Day, and had victories over two Ju88s. He was appointed to No.302 Sqn in the Pacific but had yet to arrive when the Japanese surrendered. He continued his career in the RAF until his retirement. Sadly, Richard Haine died on 30th September 2008



Squadron Leader Brian Hanafin DFC
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Squadron Leader Brian Hanafin DFC

Joining 105 Squadron flying Blenheims, in July 1941 Titch Hanafin was posted to Malta, under the command of Hughie Edwards VC. They carried out many low level shipping strikes in an attempt to halt supplies to Rommel in North Africa. In November 1942 he joined 487 sqn RNZAF, carrying out attacks on V-1 sites. On 18th February 1944 he led the second flight of 487 Sqn assigned to attack the Amiens Prison, and in October piloted the F.P.U. Mosquito on the Aarhus Gestapo raid in Denmark.



Sergeant Leopold Heimes
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2009Died : 2009
Sergeant Leopold Heimes

Already in the Belgian Air Force, he moved to 235 Sqn Coastal Command as an Air Gunner on Blenheims during the Battle of Britain before becoming a pilot, flying Spitfires and Catalinas with 350 Sqn before converting to 76 Sqn on Dakotas in India. Heimes stayed in the RAF until September 1951 having been gazetted as a Master Pilot. Sadly, Leopold Heimes died in 2009.




Flight Lieutenant Aubrey Hilly Hilliard
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Flight Lieutenant Aubrey Hilly Hilliard

'Hilly' Hilliard trained as a pilot on Blenheims and Beaufighters, and in April 1943 was posted to 618 Squadron on Mosquitos, specially formed to carry Barnes Wallis's famous bouncing bomb. In August he transferred to the Mosquitos of the Banff Strike Wing. Whilst attacking and damaging a number of U-boats, one of which returned fire, damaging his aircraft. Forty years later 'Hilli' met the U-boat's capitan, Gunther Heinfich, and became good friends.



W/O S. F. (Paddy) Hope
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W/O S. F. (Paddy) Hope

W/O S. F. (Paddy) Hope joined the RAFVR in July 1940 and trained as a WOP/Nav at Blackpool, Yatesbury, Torquay and Staverton, joining 236 Squadron, Coastal Command at Carew Cheriton, S. Wales in October 1941 on Blenheims. After 3 operations, he converted to Beaufighters before moving to Wattisham, where he did 3 operations on Beaufighters over the German Bight. Paddy then transferred to PRU Benson on Mosquitoes in May 1942. He completed 20 more ops with F/O F McKay (N.Z.) before baling out over Belgium in December 1942 after engine failure. After evading for one month, he was captured at the Spanish frontier with Comete Line leader (A deJongh) and held by the Gestapo for questioning, for four months. He was made a P.o.W. in Germany until returning home on 11 May 1945.




Lieutenant Colonel Robert A Karr
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2009Ace : 6.00 Victories
Lieutenant Colonel Robert A Karr

Robert Karr was born on January 11, 1924, in Waterloo, Iowa. Robert enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserve on July 31, 1942, and entered the Aviation Cadet Program of the U.S. Army Air Forces on February 8, 1943, receiving his commission as a 2d Lt and pilot wings at Spence Field, Georgia, on November 3, 1943. After completing P-47 Thunderbolt training and serving with the 536th Fighter Squadron of the 87th Fighter Group, Lt Karr was assigned as a P-51C Mustang pilot with the 5th Fighter Squadron of the 52nd Fighter Group in North Africa and Italy from May 1944 to June 1945. Operating out of Madna Airfield in Italy, he got his first victory when he downed an Me109 near Udine on 9th June, adding two more a few weeks later. On 17th July, leading a flight of P51Ds, he shot down three more Me109s in a day near Blata, Poland. A P51 Ace with 6 victories plus 2 more damaged in the air to his credit, he retired from the service in 1976.

Citation for the Silver Star :

For gallantry in action as pilot of a P-51 type aircraft. On 17 December 1944, Capt Karr led a squadron formation as escort to heavy bombers attacking strategic enemy oil installations in Biata, Poland. Approaching the target a large formation of enemy fighters was sighted and, despite the superiority in numbers of the hostile force Capt Karr immediately led his squadron in attack. In the ensuing aerial battle, displaying outstanding aggressiveness, leadership and combat proficiency, Capt Karr destroyed three enemy aircraft, while his squadron accounted for three more destroyed and the remainder of the enemy formation was driven from the area. Through his highly effective protective cover, the bombers were thus enabled to complete a highly successful mission unmolested. By his conspicuous gallantry, aggressive leadership and intense devotion to duty, as evidenced throughout sixty-eight (68) successful missions against the enemy and six enemy aircraft destroyed in aerial flight, Capt Karr has reflected great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States of America.


Bill Knight
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Bill Knight

Navigator on Beaufighters with No.143 Squadron, part of the North Coates strike wing.




Air Commodore C D Kit North Lewis DSO DFC
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25 / 3 / 2008Died : 25 / 3 / 2008
Air Commodore C D Kit North Lewis DSO DFC

After joining the Army in 1939, Kit North Lewis transferred to the RAF in 1940. In Aug 1941, after pilot training, he was posted to 13 Squadron, flying Blenheims, where he took part in the first 1000 bomber raids. After a spell with 26 Squadron, flying P-51 Mustangs, in Feb 1944 he joined 182 Squadron on Typhoons, as a Flight Commander. A few months later he was posted to command 181 Squadron. He led this squadron into France where it became part of 124 Typhoon Wing. In Aug 1944 he was promoted Wing Leader 124 Wing, where he remained until the end of the war. He died on 25th March 2008. 'Unfortunately my active participation in the Falaise operations was limited as I had a mild form of dysentery from 8th to 14th and I was sent home for a weeks recuperation from 16th to 24th August. However, I was very much involved on the 7th in the German attack at Mortain. I was leading 181 Squadron on an armed reconnaissance when Charles Green who was then the Wing Leader of 121 Wing reported large German tank concentrations at Mortain. Although this was inside the bomb line I accepted his verification and I immediately diverted to Mortain. There we found German tanks strung out along the road. We claimed 10 flamers. I followed this up with two more sorties in which we claimed another 7. There was very little flak, the main danger being the number of allied aircraft around the honey pot. During the period 6th to 21st August the Wing lost 9 pilots killed including Group Captain Charles Appleton and 4 taken POW.'



Ken Lilly
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Ken Lilly

Flew on Beaufighters as a Navigator with No.236 Squadron as part of the North Coates strike wing.



Squadron Leader Mick Maguire
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Squadron Leader Mick Maguire

Having signed up in 1936, he served as both a Gunner and Bomb Aimer with 88 and 9 Squadrons. He flew on many aircraft including Blenheims, Bostons and Lancasters and also spent time with the Air Ministry.



Aubrey Mann
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Aubrey Mann

Pilot, Bostons and Blenheims.



Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC*
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22 / 2 / 2009Died : 22 / 2 / 2009
Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC*

Born in Greenock in November 1917, Tom McPhee joined the RAFVR in 1938, and at the outbreak of war Tom was called up and posted to 139 Squadron as a Sergeant Pilot flying Blenheims on low level bombing raids. He was commissioned in 1941. In August 1943 he joined 464 Squadron flying Mosquitos, and in February 1944 took part in Operation Jericho when 18 Mosquitos of 140 Wing , nd TAF, attacked the Gestapo held prison at Amiens, liberating over 100 French Resistance fighters, many of whom had been condemned to execution the following morning. Flying number two on the raid he was promoted to Squadron Leader as a result. From June 1944 he was posted to a Forward Control Unit until the end of the war. Sadly passed away 22nd February 2009.



Flight Lieutenant Ronald W Meeking
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Flight Lieutenant Ronald W Meeking

Undertook flying training at Heany, Southern Rhodsia and at Nakuru, Kenya, before joining 55 Squadron in the Western Desert where he flew Mark IV Blenheims and Baltimores. Following an injury, he was repatriated to the UK and eventually joined 57 Squadron at East Kirkby in December 1944. From then until 1945 he completed 16 operational flights, the last being on April 25th 1945 when he was engaged in dropping mines in Oslo fjord and upon returning to East Kirkby, the aircraft he was flying, Lancaster LM231 was the last Lancaster to return to East Kirkby from an operational flight.



Wing Commander Roger Morewood
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Wing Commander Roger Morewood

An uncle suggested to Roger Morewood that he should join the RAF so Roger did at the age of 17. Roger said : I was going be a pilot, that was the only reason to join. Roger trained to fly in a Tiger Moth biplane before joining 56 Squadron - regarded within the RAF as an elite unit - flying open cockpit Gauntlet fighters. The squadron were then re-equipped with Gloster Gladiators - the last RAF biplane - then the Hawker Hurricanes that would join Spitfires in fighting off Hitlers Luftwaffe in the Battle of Britain. While serving with 56 Squadron Roger Morewood was assigned the dangerous role of long-range fighter sweeps over the coast of occupied France and Holland but left to help form 248 Sqn at Hendon with whom he served throughout the Battle of Britain flying Blenheims. Roger said: We had a few panic station alerts when we were scrambled. We wouldd be leaping into our aircraft with flying suits over our pyjamas as we tried to get into the air in a minute and a half. In July 1942 Morewood went to 9 OTU and later HQ Transport Command. After a long post-war career in the RAF he retired in 1957. Roger Morewood once said of his squadron: It was damned dodgy. We had a high loss rate on operations. And on one sortie - then aged 21 - he nearly met his maker : I flew across to Den Helder (Northern Holland) in a long-nosed Blenheim to look after this battleship at the entrance to the Zuiderzee. We flew round this thing and sure enough I saw some aircraft coming up. They were twin-engine bombers naturally - Messerschmitt 110s. That was a bit hairy. My two blokes (other pilots) shoved off in a hurry into a cloud, and there was me popping away until I ran out of ammunition. There was just me left. I realised there was no point chasing - I was not going to knock his wings off. So I started flying home. After making hardly any noise all flight the chap (navigator) in the back said you haveve got somebody on your tail now - you had better move swiftly. So I moved to left and right. We got a pretty hefty clobbering. His turret disappeared at the back. My poor navigator wore a tin hat and I dont blame him. He got a bullet half way through his armour. He was alright. I had a dreadful wound. If I shook my hand really hard I could get blood out of one finger. I was hit all over the place. We took dozens of bullets. The aircraft was ruined. That is all there was to it. We were still going home - even with the North Sea to go across. So I trundled off back and ditched the damn thing. Thank God it didnt blow up. We literally got away with it. It was the hairiest trip I ever did. On another occasion, Roger intercepted a German weather forecasting flying boat called Weary Willy : I was in a Beaufighter at this time. I flew upwind and had a shot at him downwind. Then all the guns jammed. So I pulled alongside him - not too close - and waved him good luck lad. Anyway he sank when he got back to Norway. That was that one finished. Flying from Shetland, his squadron attacked German shipping off Norway. Roger was rested and spent two years training new Beaufighter pilots but still managed to go on some operations, mainly attacking convoys off the coast of Holland. Roger Morewood said: job was to attack the flak ships, floating anti-aircraft batteries, so other Beaufighters could attack the cargo ships. It could be pretty hairy as 12 Beaufighters lined up to have a crack at the target. You wouldd see tracer shells from your mates plane whizzing over your head or underneath you. They were a bigger danger than the Germans Wing Commander Roger Morwood was posted to the Mediterranean where he contracted TB. He recalled: "In hospital, they treated you with whisky in milk and a pint of Guinness for breakfast, very primitive stuff." When the war ended and the RAF were scaled down, Roger continued to serve in various postings around the UK until 1947. after leaving the RAF Roger was recalled again as an instructor at the Central Flying School, but with the rank of flight lieutenant. He was posted to Edinburgh and then Glasgow University squadrons. finnaly leaving service in 1957. Wing Commander Roger Morewood notched up more than 5000 flying hours in 32 different types of aircraft.

Roger Morewood signing the print A Day for Heroes

Roger Morewood signing the print Ground Force



Flt Lt Aubrey Niner
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Flt Lt Aubrey Niner

Aubrey Niner was a Blenheim pilot with 88 Sqn. He was shot down over Lille in July 1942 and during one of several planned attempts from Stalag Luft III he was a gymnast in the famous Wooden Horse escape plot prior to ‘The Great Escape’.



Squadron Leader Charles Patterson
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Squadron Leader Charles Patterson

Charles Patterson joined the RAF on the outbreak of WWII and flew Whitleys. He switched to Blenheims in 1940 with 114 Squadron on anti-shipping operations over Norway. After a period instructing he briefly flew Bostons before converting to Mosquitoes with 105 Squadron flying mostly Daylight raids, but also the first night raid to Berlin. In January 1943 he was selected as pilot for the Mosquito Film Unit and flew Mosquito DZ414 (now restored) on over 20,000 operational hours both day and night. In September 1943 he converted 3 Ventura Squadrons to Mosquitoes under Group Captain Pickard. In total he completed an unprecedented 3 tours on Mosquitoes, his final tour being with 487 Squadron (New Zealand) mainly on strikes against V1 sites. On D-Day he flew the film unit Mosquito over the beach head during the invasion.




Squadron Leader Basil Stapleton DFC
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13 / 4 / 2010Died : 13 / 4 / 2010
13 / 4 / 2010Ace : 6.00 Victories
Squadron Leader Basil Stapleton DFC

Born in South Africa, Basil Stapleton joined the RAF in Jan 1939, being posted to 603 Sqn flying Spitfires. He first saw action off Scotland, sharing in the destruction of two bombers, before the Squadron was posted south to Hornchurch during the height of the Battle of Britain. By Nov 1940 his tally had risen to 6 and 2 shared victories and 8 probables. In March 1942 he was posted to 257 Sqn as flight commander. In August 1944 he commanded 247 Sqn flying Typhoons, taking part in the Arnhem operations. In December 1944, whilst attacking a train, debris hit his aircraft forcing him to land behind enemy lines where he was taken prisoner of war. Stapme Stapleton had scored 6 victories, plus 2 shared, 5 probable and 2 damaged. Sadly, we have learned that Basil Stapleton passed away on 13th April 2010.



Flt Lt Robert Stone, Croix de Guerre
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Flt Lt Robert Stone, Croix de Guerre

Volunteered for flying duties in 1941 and was trained as a pilot in Canada. On returning to the UK he trained on Blenheims and was posted to North Africa early in 1943. He was invalided home after a short period, having suffered a rare tropical disease and was posted to Bomber Command and trained on Wellingtons. He was subsequently posted to 550 Squadron, No1 Group, stationed at North Killingholme in Lincolnshire, flying Lancasters. After completing 29 operations he was grounded (having developed a duodenal ulcer) and was discharged from the RAF shortly afterwards. He was subsequently awarded the Croix de Guerre.



Wing Commander Richard G B Summers
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Wing Commander Richard G B Summers

Richard G B Summers was a navigator on Blenheims with 219 squadron at the age of 18. He fought throughout the Battle of Britain and after the cmapaign served in West Africa and Gibraltar. After the war he served on V-Bombers and received an OBE for gallant and distinguished service during the Mau Mau emergency in Kenya during the 1950's



Sqn Ldr Douglas Tidy
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14 / 4 / 2010Died : 14 / 4 / 2010
Sqn Ldr Douglas Tidy

Sqn. Ldr. Douglas Tidy was born in 1923. Claiming to be 18 in early 1940 he joined the RAF. Defective eyesight that was discovered (despite charts learned and magic white powder’ ended his career as a tyro pilot and by the summer of 1941 he was in he Operations Room at Portreath in Cornwall, happily still with Spitfires, those of 66 and 130 Squadrons. By 1942 he was in his way to the Middle East, having flown on his first twin-engined aircraft, a Wellington of 38 Squadron, as a Wireless Operator. After an attachment to the Transjordan Frontier Force at Zerka, he joined 74 Squadron which was assisting B24s of the 98th Bomb Group, United States Army Air Corps at Ramat David in Palestine. He served under five Commanding Officers with 74 Squadron, before joining 244 Squadron with Blenheims at Sharjah in the Persian Gulf and later with Wellingtons on Masirah Island. From there he went to Aden and back to the UK with redundant aircrew to Mosquitoes at Haverfordwest. Sadly, we have learned that Douglas Tidy passed away on 14th April 2010.




J R Toombs
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11 / 12 / 2006Died : 11 / 12 / 2006
J R Toombs

John Richard Jack Toombs flew Blenheims during the Battle of Britain with No.236 Sqn, and also flew with No.264 Sqn and has also flown Defiants. Jack Toombs passed away on 11th December 2006.



Squadron Leader Michael Terry Wainwright
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Squadron Leader Michael Terry Wainwright

Squadron Leader Michael Terry Wainwright joined 64 Squadron RAF flying Spitfires and in May 1940 during the Battle of Birtain destroyed an Me109. On the 25th of July his section destroyed a Messershmitt Bf109 fighter encountered off the south coast. He went on to become a flight instructor at the Central Flying School at RAF Upavon, Wiltshire, and later flew Douglas Dakotas. Sqd Ldr Michael Terry Wainwright retired form the Royal Air Force in March 1958, but continued his flying as an instructor and also as a Civil Airline Pilot in the UK as well as the Middle East. Michael still flew until August 1st 1990 and logged a total of 14,100 hours.



Flying Officer Doug Waite
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Flying Officer Doug Waite

Volunteered at the age of 18 and went solo at Brough in Yorkshire, from where he went to Canada for further training at EFTS and SFTS with a final period at Spitalgate near Grantham flying Blenheims, Beauforts and Beaufighters. Doug then joined 169 Squadron Mosquito night-fighter unit attached to 100 group, conducting various deployments. The last one being 48 hours before the war ended, flying to Sylt at low-level dropping Napalm jelly 100 gallon drop tanks as bombs.



Flight Lieutenant S J 'Stan' Williams
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Flight Lieutenant S J 'Stan' Williams

Joining the RAAF in May 1941, Stan Williams left for the U.K. via the U.S., arriving in England after a five month trip. Initially flying Blenheims and Beaufighters, he eventually joined 456 Squadron (RAAF) in 1943 on Mosquitoes, flying out of RAF Ford. The role of 456 at this time was to include Ranger and Intruder missions, as well as night defense, especially prior to D-Day. They also defended against V1s at night. Their last mission of the war was against He177s towing glider bombs en-route to Scapa Flow, they destroyed the lot.




Flight Lieutenant Kenneth Wolstenholme DFC*
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26 / 3 / 2002Died : 26 / 3 / 2002
Flight Lieutenant Kenneth Wolstenholme DFC*

Ken Wolstenholme was a pilot first with 107 Sqn flying Blenheims before joining 8 Group Pathfinders flying Mosquitos. He completed 100 ops. After the war he became a famous sports broadcaster with the BBC. He died 26th March 2002.



Alex Yates
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Alex Yates

No.236 Sqn Beaufighter pilot who flew with the North Coates strike wing.


Squadrons for : Blenheim
A list of all squadrons from known to have used this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.101 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th July 1917

Mens agitat molem - Mind over matter

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No.101 Sqn RAF

No 101 Squadron was formed on 12th July 1917 and based at South Farnborough. The squadron was commanded by Major The Hon L J E Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, and by the end of July the squadron was sent to France where 101 Squadron was to become the second specialist night-bomber unit in the Royal Flying Corps. 101 Squadron was equipped with the FE2b two-seat pusher bi-plane and on the 20th September 1917 began flying night bombing missions during the Battle of Menin Ridge. 101 1quadron continued night bombing missions during the 3rd Battle of Ypres and the Battle of Cambrai. 101 squadron attacked several German long-range night bomber airfields during February 1918 and these missions were among the first offensive counter air operations and up until the end of the war continued bombing missions. After the First World War 101 squadron were based in Belgium until March 1919 when returning to Britian and disbanded on the 31st December. No.101 squadron reformed on the 21st March 1928 at RAF Bircham Newton and in March 1929 the squadron was issued with the new bomber the Boulton and Paul Sidestrand. The squadron moved to RAF Andover iIn October 1929 where it remained until December 1934 when 101 squadron moved to RAF Bicester and issued with the the improved Boulton Paul Overstrand, which featured the first powered gun turret in RAF aircraft as well as othe rmodifications including more powerful engines. The Boulton Paul Overstrand is displayed on 101 Squadron's official badge. In June 1938 No 101 Squadron re-equipped with Bristol Blenheim and was stationed now at RAF West Raynham in May 1939, as part of No 2 Group, Bomber Command. When World War Two broke out 101 Squadron were stationed at RAF Brize Norton, but returned to West Raynham. It was not until the fall of France when the squadron became operational but suffered a set back when its officer commanding, Wg Cdr J H Hargroves, and his crew were lost on its first bombing mission on 5th July 1940. During the Battle of Britain 101 Squadron Blenhiems carried out bombing missions against the German barges in French ports as well as German airfields in France. Another OC 101 Squadron, Wg Cdr D Addenbrooke, was lost on the 3rd April while taking part in a raid on French ports just 3 days after taking command. 101 Squadron were re-equipped with the Vickers Wellington in April 1940 and were based at RAF Oakington and became part of No 3 Group bomber command. On the 24th July 101 Squadron lost its first Wellington on a raid against Brest. Ten Wellingtons of 101 Squadron took part in the first 1,000 bomber raid on Cologne, but losses began to mount and between July and September the Squadron lost 20 Wellingtons with 86 aircrew killed. In September 101 Squadron moved to RAF Holme-on-Spalding-Moor in Septmber 1942 and became the first operational Avro Lancaster squadron in No 1 Group.Bomber Command. 101 squadron moved to its final wartime base, RAF Ludford Magna on 15th June 1943. 101 Squadrons Lancasters took part in the raids on Hamburg and the raid on the secret German rocket site at Peenemunde. Over the winter of 1943-1944 No.101 squadron took part in the raid on Berlin but suffered high casualties. On the 31st March 1944, during the Nuremberg Raid, 101 Squadron lost 7 Lancasters and crews out of 26 dispatched. In the spring and summer of 1944 101 squadron attacked targets in France in preparation for and support of the allied invasion of Normandy. On D-Day, the squadron used ABC to jam nightfighter controllers to protect the British airborne landings. After D-Day 101 squadron continued raids on German cities with their last bombing mission on Berchtesgarden on 25th April 1945. 101 bomber squadron suffered the highest casualties of any Royal Air Force Squadron during the Second World War, losing 1176 aircrew killed in action. In October 1945, the Squadron moved to RAF Binbrook and later equipped with Avro Lincolns. In May 1952 101 squadorn became the first bomber squadron to receive the first Jet Bomber the English Electric Canberra B2 and in 1954 were stationed in Malaya carrying out bombing misisons against terrorist targets. In October 1956 during the Suez crisis to Malta for Operation MUSKETEER bombing raids against Egypt befroe being disbanded in February 1957 but in 1959 101 squadron was reformed and re equipped with the new Avro Vulcan B1 and the first squadorn to be armed with the British H Bomb, In 1961 101 squadron moved to RAF Waddington. In 1968 the squadron was equipped with the new Vulcan B2 . In 1982,101 Squadron Vulcans took part in Operation CORPORATE, during the Falklands War. A 101 Squadron crew carried out the first and last Operation BLACKBUCK Vulcan conventional bombing raids on Argentinean forces occupying Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands. These 8,000 mile round trip missions required extensive use of Air to Air refuelling. After the Falklands war 101 squadron was equipped with VC10s and supplied fighter aircraft with air to air refuelling during all major conflicts form Bosnia, to Operation Desert Storm and continues today in this role.

No.104 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1917
Fate : Disbanded 24th May 1963

Strike hard

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No.104 Sqn RAF

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No.105 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 23rd September 1917
Fate : Disbanded 1st February 1968

Fortis in proeliis - Valiant in battles

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No.105 Sqn RAF

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No.107 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 8th October 1917
Fate : Disbanded 10th July 1963

Nous y serons - We shall be there

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No.107 Sqn RAF

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No.108 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 11th November 1917
Fate : Disbanded 28th March 1945

Viribus contractis - With gathering strength

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No.108 Sqn RAF

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No.11 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 14th December 1915

Ociores acrierosque aquilis - Swifter and keener than eagles

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No.11 Sqn RAF

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No.110 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st November 1917
Fate : Disbanded 15th February 1971
Hyderabad

Nec timio nec sperno - I neither fear nor despise

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No.110 Sqn RAF

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No.113 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1917
Fate : Disbanded 10th July 1963

Velox et vindex - Swift to Vengeance

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No.113 Sqn RAF

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No.114 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 22nd September 1917
Fate : Disbanded 31st October 1971
Hong Kong

With speed I strike

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No.114 Sqn RAF

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No.13 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 10th January 1915

Adjuvamus tuendo - We assist by watching

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No.13 Sqn RAF

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No.139 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 3rd July 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1968
Jamaica

Si placet necamus - We destroy at will

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No.139 Sqn RAF

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No.14 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 3rd February 1915

I spread my wings and keep my promise

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No.14 Sqn RAF

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No.140 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st May 1918
Fate : Disbanded 20th September 1945
Photo Reconnaissance

Foresight

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No.140 Sqn RAF

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No.141 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st January 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st March 1964

Caedimus noctu - We slay by night

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No.141 Sqn RAF

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No.143 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st February 1918
Fate : Disbanded 25th May 1945

Vincere est vivere - To conquer is to live

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No.143 Sqn RAF

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No.15 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st March 1915

Aim sure

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No.15 Sqn RAF

On 1st March 1915, the officers and men who made up No.1 Reserve Squadron and the Recruits Depot, all of whom were based at South Farnborough, Hampshire, were brought together to form No.15 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Initially, the new squadron was equipped with a diverse range of flying machines, including Henri and Maurice Farmans, Avros, Bleriots, Moranes and BE2c aircraft. Having relocated to an airfield at Hounslow, west of London, where the squadron was allowed time to work up to operational status, it was, on 11th May, relocated to another airfield at Swingate Down, to the east of Dover, on the Kent coast. On 23rd December 1915, No.15 Squadron, RFC, deployed to France for operational duties. Throughout its time on the Western Front, during the First World War, the squadron was engaged in observation and reconnaissance duties, initially using BE2c aircraft but later, during June 1916, upgrading to R.E.8s. The work undertaken by the squadron, in its reconnaissance role, was recognised by higher authority, on a number of occasions, in the form of telegrams or communiqués. On 1st April 1918, No.15 Squadron became part of the newly formed Royal Air Force, which came into being with the amalgamation of the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service. With the end of hostilities in November 1918, came a reduction in the fighting strength of the RAF and, although not disbanded as a number of squadrons were, No.15 was reduced to a cadre. The axe finally fell on the final day of December 1919, when No.15 Squadron was disbanded.

It was to be approximately five years before No.15s number plate was to be resurrected when, on 20th March 1924, No.15 Squadron was reformed as part of the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment (A&AEE), at Martlesham Heath, Suffolk. Over a period of ten years, No.15 Squadron completed 12,100 flying hours on over seventy-five different types of airframe. Over that same period, it also saw five changes of commanding officer.

On 1st June 1934, No.15 was re-designated as a new unit, equipped with Hawker Hart Mk.I aircraft, undertaking daylight operations flying as part of Bomber Command. The new C.O. was Squadron Leader Thomas Elmhirst, who secured permission for his squadron to change the number plate to Roman numerals and have the XV applied to the fuselage on all the squadrons aircraft. This decision was to have a lasting effect and was only interrupted by the Second World War. Thomas Elmhirst also gave thought to the fact the squadron should have its own badge and motto, both of which were approved, during 1935. In early 1936, the squadron re-equipped with Hawker Hind bomber aircraft. These machines remained in service with No.XV until 13th July 1938, when the unit converted to Fairey Battle bomber aircraft. It was with the latter aircraft that the squadron prepared for war when, on 27th August 1939, a state of emergency was declared.

History repeated itself when the Squadron returned to France on a war footing, but it was forced to return to England in order to re-equip with the Bristol Blenheim bomber. The new aircraft was initially seen as a wonder aircraft, but No.XV Squadron was virtually decimated in strength following the German invasion of the Netherlands in May 1940. With the Blenheim being designated unsuitable for the task, the squadron began converting to the Vickers Wellington bomber, designed by Barnes Wallace, on 7th November 1940. This was really a stop-gap measure as on 30th April 1941 No.XV began converting to the Short Stirling, four-engine, heavy bomber. During the next couple of years, night after night, the squadron carried the fight back to the enemy, enduring many losses and exploits of valour in the process. It participated in all the 1,000 bomber raids against Germany.

As 1943 drew to a close, No.XV prepared to continue the fight with new equipment. Having converted to the Avro Lancaster bomber in late December 1943, the squadron went operational in mid-January 1944 with its new aircraft. By the time the war came to an end, No.XV was flying Lancaster B.1 Specials, which were specially adapted to carry 22,000lb Grand Slam bombs. February 1947 saw another change of equipment when the squadron converted to the Avro Lincoln bomber, whilst based at RAF Wyton in Huntingdonshire. However, by the end of that same year, No.XV found itself deploying aircraft to Shallufa, Egypt, as part of Operation Sunrise.

Another change of occurred at the end of November 1950, when No.XV Squadron was disbanded but immediately reformed with Boeing B29 Washington bomber aircraft. It was during the Washington period, in March 1951, that the squadrons code letters ‘LS’, which it had been adopted during late 1939, were removed from the aircraft fuselages. The new scheme called for a natural metal finish, adorned with only the RAF roundel, fin flash and aircraft serial. With technology advancing all the time, No.XV entered a new phase in its history in June 1953, when it was declared fully operational flying English Electric Canberra bombers. During the next couple of years, the squadron continued to train and undertook many navigational and bombing exercises, which proved fruitful in 1956 when the Suez crises erupted. No.XV was deployed to Nicosia, as part of Operation Accumulate, on 23rd October. During the short period of fighting that followed, No.XV dropped a higher concentration of bombs than any other squadron. Following a cease-fire, the squadron returned to England where, on 15th April 1957, it was disbanded.

The 1st of September 1958 saw the re-formation of No.XV as a V-Bomber squadron, equipped with Handley Page Victor B.I bombers. These aircraft were not only adorned with the official RAF insignia described above, but were also permitted to carry the squadron badge, together with the Roman XV numerals. The squadron retained these aircraft until 1964 when it was again disbanded. For a period of five years No.XV Squadron ceased to exist. However, this changed on 1st October 1970, when the squadron number plate and badge were resurrected and No.XV was reformed at RAF Honnington, in Suffolk. Equipped with Blackburn S.2B Buccaneer aircraft, the squadron departed for RAF Laarbruch, where, during January 1971, it officially became part of Royal Air Force Germany. After thirteen years service with the squadron, the Buccaneers were replaced with Panavia Tornado, swing-wing, bombers. On 1st September 1983, No.XV became the first RAF Squadron in Germany to be equipped with this type of aircraft. During the latter quarter of 1990, No.XV had deployed two flights, totalling twelve crews, to Muharraq Air Base, on Bahrain Island, in readiness for operations against the Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. During the following conflict, two aircraft crewed by XV Squadron personnel were shot down, resulting in the loss of Flt Lt Stephen Hicks and the capture of Flt Lts John Peters, John Nichol and Rupert Clark.

The squadron returned to RAF Laarbruch at the end of March 1991, where a number of awards, for service in the Gulf War were announced. Wing Commander John Broardbent was awarded a Distinguished Service Order, whilst Sqn Ldr Gordon Buckley and Sqn Ldr Nigel Risdale were both awarded Distinguished Flying Crosses. Senior Engineering Officer S/L Rob Torrence was awarded the Member of the British Empire. Following disbandment in January 1992, No.XV was reformed a few months later on 1st April, at RAF Honnington, where it took on the role of the Tornado Weapons Conversion Unit. It was also granted the status of a Reserve Squadron. No.XV (R) Squadron remained at Honnington until 1st November 1993, when it re-located to RAF Lossiemouth, Moray, Scotland. During January 1998, it was re-designated as the Tornado GR1 Operational Conversion Unit and equipped with the up-graded Tornado GR4 variant. In 2011, just four years away from its 100th anniversary, No.XV (R) Squadron still operates from RAF Lossiemouth, providing refresher crews and new crews to the front line squadrons.


Text by kind permission of Martyn Ford Jones

No.18 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 11th May 1915
Burma

Animo et fide - With courage and faith

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No.18 Sqn RAF

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No.21 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 23rd July 1915
Fate : Disbanded 31st January 1976

Viribus vincimus - By strength we conquer

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No.21 Sqn RAF

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No.211 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 15th March 1946

Toujours a propos - Always at the right moment

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No.211 Sqn RAF

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No.218 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 24th April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 23rd August 1963
Gold Coast

In time

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No.218 Sqn RAF

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No.219 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 22nd July 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st July 1957

From dusk till dawn

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No.219 Sqn RAF

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No.222 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th June 1964
Natal

Pembili bo

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No.222 Sqn RAF

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No.226 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 9th March 1963

Non sibi sed patriae - For country not for self

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No.226 Sqn RAF

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No.229 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 20th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 10th January 1945

Be bold

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No.229 Sqn RAF

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No.23 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1915

Semper aggessus - Always having attacked

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No.23 Sqn RAF

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No.235 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 10th July 1945

Jaculamur humi - We strike them to the ground

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No.235 Sqn RAF

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No.236 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 25th May 1945

Speculati nuntiate - Having watched, bring word

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No.236 Sqn RAF

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No.244 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 25th July 1918
Fate : Disbanded 1st May 1945

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No.244 Sqn RAF

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No.248 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1946

Il faut en finir - It is necessary to make an end of it

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No.248 Sqn RAF

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No.25 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 25th September 1915

Feriens Tego - Striking I defend

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No.25 Sqn RAF

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No.252 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : May 1918
Fate : Disbanded 1st December 1946

With or on

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No.252 Sqn RAF

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No.27 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 5th November 1915

Quam celerrime ad astra - With all speed to the stars

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No.27 Sqn RAF

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No.272 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 25th July 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th April 1945

On, on!

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No.272 Sqn RAF

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No.29 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th November 1915

Impiger et acer - Energetic and keen

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No.29 Sqn RAF

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No.30 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 24th March 1915

Ventre a terre - All out

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No.30 Sqn RAF

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No.313 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 10th May 1941
Fate : Disbanded 15th February 1946
Czech

Jeden jestrab mnoho vran rozhan - One hawk scatters many crows

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No.313 Sqn RAF

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No.34 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th January 1916
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1967

Lupus vult, lupus volat - Wolf wishes, wolf flies

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No.34 Sqn RAF

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No.39 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th April 1916

Die noctuque - By day and night

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No.39 Sqn RAF

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No.40 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 26th February 1916
Fate : Disbanded 1st February 1957

Hostem coelo expellere - To drive the enemy from the sky

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No.40 Sqn RAF

40 Squadron Royal Air Force: 40 squadron was formed at Gosport on 26th February 1916 as a scout squadron equipped with the FE8. One flight went to France in early August and the rest of the squadron at the end of the month. However, the FE8 was soon obsolete and 40 squadron was unable to be effective in its task of fighting when faced with a faster aircraft. In March 1917 the squadron suffered heavy casualties when 9 aircraft were caught on patrol by Jasta 11 led by Manfred von Richthofen and all aircraft were brought down with four pilots killed. Before the end of March they were re-equipped with Nieuport Scouts and with these, 40 squadron began a successful career, flying offensive patrols and developing its own tactics for observation balloon attacks. During this period one of the 40 Squadron officers Lieutenant Edward Mannock (later Major Mannock VC) destroyed 6 enemy aircraft and went on to a highly successful fighting career in command of two other squadrons. Before the end of 1917, 40 Squadron replaced its scouts with the highly successful S.E.5.a and continued offensive operations against the German armed forces until the end of the First World War. It ended the war with a squadron tally of 130 enemy aircraft and 30 balloons destroyed. The squadron returned to the UK in February 1919 and was disbanded 4th July the same year. It was reformed on 1st April 1931 as a bomber squadron and served in the UK and the Middle East theatre. It was disbanded in Egypt during 1947 and reformed later that year as a transport squadron until 1950. In 1953 it was again reformed as a bomber squadron before being finally disbanded in 1956.

No.404 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 15th April 1941
Fate : Disbanded 25th May 1945

Ready to fight

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No.404 Sqn RCAF

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No.406 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 5th May 1941
Fate : Disbanded 31st August 1945
City of Saskatoon

We kill by night

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No.406 Sqn RCAF

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No.407 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 8th May 1941
Fate : Disbanded 4th June 1945
Demon

To hold on high

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No.407 Sqn RCAF

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No.415 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 20th August 1941
Fate : Disbanded 15th May 1945
Swordfish

Ad metam - To the mark

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No.415 Sqn RCAF

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No.44 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th April 1916
Fate : Disbanded 21st December 1982
Rhodesia

Fulmina regis justa - The Kings thunderbolts are righteous

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No.44 Sqn RAF

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No.45 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st March 1916

Per ardue surge - Through difficulties I arise

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No.45 Sqn RAF

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No.455 Sqn RAAF

Country : Australia
Founded : 6th June 1941
Fate : Disbanded 25th May 1945

Strike and strike again

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No.455 Sqn RAAF

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No.456 Sqn RAAF

Country : Australia
Founded : 30th June 1941
Fate : Disbanded 15th June 1945

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No.456 Sqn RAAF

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No.489 Sqn RNZAF

Country : New Zealand
Founded : 12th August 1941
Fate : Disbanded 1st August 1945
Coastal Command

Whakatanagata kia kaha - Quit ye like me, be strong

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No.489 Sqn RNZAF

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No.500 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 16th March 1931
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of Kent (Auxiliary)

Qua fata vocent - Whither the fates may call

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No.500 Sqn RAF

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No.504 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 26th March 1928
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of Nottingham (Auxiliary)

Vindicat in ventis - It avenges in the wind

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No.504 Sqn RAF

504 (County of Nottingham) Squadron Royal Auxiliary Air Force: 504 Squadron came into being on the 14th March 1926 based at Hucknell as part of the Special Reserve Squadron in the light bomber role. The squadron was equipped with Horsleys, Wallaces and Hinds before becoming a fighter squadron equipped with Gloster Gauntlets on 31st October 1938. By the beginning of World War II, 504 had been re-equipped with Hawker Hurricanes. The squadrons first victory was a Ju88 shot down over France on May 14th 1940 where it had been sent as a BEF reinforcement. After suffering heavy losses in France, 504 was sent back to Wick in the UK and began to build itself back to operational strength. On 5th September 1940 504 flew to Hendon and began intensive operations attacking German formations over London and the South East of England during the Battle of Britain. During 1941, 504 was re-equipped with Mk IIb Hurricanes and then divided. A flight joining No.81 squadron to go to Russian and a new 504 squadron being built up from B flight. 504 squadron saw action throughout World War II, taking part in offensive fighter sweeps over occupied Europe, escorting transport aircraft to Arnhem and bomber escort duties. During January 1945, six pilots were posted to Glosters for conversion to the Meteor, but the war ended in Europe before they could be used in combat. On 16th December 1947 King George VI gave permission for the use of the Royal prefix for all Auxiliary Air Force squadrons. On 12th February 1957 504 squadron Royal Auxiliary Air Force based at RAF Wyneswold was disbanded.

No.521 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1941.
Fate : Disbanded 1st April 1946

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No.521 Sqn RAF

521 Squadron was formed on the 1st August 1941 from No 1401 Flight at Bircham Newton, it continued to conduct meteorological reconnaissance duties. 521 Squadron flew Hudsons and Blenheims for North Sea patrol duties, Spitfires and Mosquitoes over Europe. It was disbanded when it was divided into Flights again, No's 1401 and 1409. But on the 1st September 1943 it was reformed in its previous role at Docking. 521 Squadron was re equipped with Hampdens, Hudsons and Gladiators, with Venturas arriving in December 1943. In August 1944 Hurricanes joined the Gladiators and Hudsons returned to replace the Venturas in September 1944. In December 1944 Flying Fortress IIs arrived for long range sorties and these were operated together with Mk IIIs from May 1945 until February 1946. Halifax Mk.III bombers replaced the Flying Fortresses in December 1945 and following the withdrawal of the Fortresses, 521 Squadorn was disbanded on 1st April 1946 at Chivenor.

No.526 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th June 1943
Fate : Disbanded 1st May 1945

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No.526 Sqn RAF

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No.527 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th June 1943
Fate : Disbanded 21st August 1958

Silently we serve

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No.527 Sqn RAF

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No.528 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 28th June 1943
Fate : Disbanded 1st September 1944

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No.528 Sqn RAF

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No.53 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th May 1916
Fate : Disbanded 14th September 1976

United in effort

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No.53 Sqn RAF

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No.55 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 8th June 1916

Nil nos tremefacit - Nothing shakes us

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No.55 Sqn RAF

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No.57 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 8th June 1916

Corpus non animum muto - I change my body not my spirit

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No.57 Sqn RAF

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No.59 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 21st June 1916
Fate : Disbanded 4th January 1961

Ab uno disce omes - From one learn all

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No.59 Sqn RAF

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No.60 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th May 1916

Per ardua ad aethera tendo - I strive through difficulties to the sky

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No.60 Sqn RAF

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No.600 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 14th October 1925
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
City of London (Auxiliary)

Praeter Sescentos - More than six hundred

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No.600 Sqn RAF

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No.601 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 14th October 1925
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of London (Auxiliary)

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No.601 Sqn RAF

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No.604 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 17th March 1930
Fate : Disbanded 10th March1957
County of Middlesex (Auxiliary)

Si vis pacem, para bellum - If you want peace, prepare for war

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No.604 Sqn RAF

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No.61 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 25th July 1917
Fate : Disbanded 31st March 1958

Per prurum tonantes - Thundering through the clear sky

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No.61 Sqn RAF

On July 1917 at RAF Rochford in Essex No.61 Squadron was formed and along with two other squadrons formed the London Air Defence Area intended to counter the daylight air raids. 61 squadron was equipped with the Sopwith Pup. The squadron first went into action on 12 thAugust, when a formation of 10 German Gotha bombers were seen over the Thames. Sixteen Sopwith Pups of No.61 Squadron took off to intercept them and succeeded in turning the enemy back, but not before two bombs had been dropped near No.61s hangars on Rochford Aerodrome. In 1918, 61 squadron was re-equipped with SE5s. When the armistice had been signed and the war was over 61 squadron was disbanded on 13th June 1919. No. 61 Squadron was re-formed on 8th March 1937 as a bomber squadron, and initially flying Hawker Audax, then the Avro Anson, followed by the Bristol Blenheim and during World War II flew with No. 5 Group, Bomer Command flying the Handley Page Hampden. The squadrons first operational mission was on 25th December 1939. The squadron then was equipped with the Avro Manchester. The slow delivery of the Manchester meant that the squadron operated both aircraft from July 1941 when the first Manchesters arrived, through to October 1941 when the use of the last of the Hampdens stopped. The squadron struggled on with the Manchester before converting to the Avro Lancaster in 1942, which 61 squadron flew for the rest of the war. Four of its Lancasters; ED860 N-Nan, EE176, JB138, and LL483, each served on more than 100 operational sorties. Records show that in the case of the first three aircraft, the long road to their centuries included participation in the raid on 3/4 November 1943, when Flt Lt William Reid of No. 61 Squadron won the Victoria Cross. After the war No. 61 Squadron re-equipped with Avro Lincolns in May 1946 and saw action in Malaya during Operation Firedog and during the Mau Mau uprising in Kenya. In 1954 at RAF Wittering, 61 Squadron was equipped with the new English Electric Canberra. The Canberras of the squadron were used during the Suez Crisis in 1956. Finally on March 31st 1958, 61 squadron wasd disbanded.

No.619 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 18th April 1943
Fate : Disbanded 18th July 1945

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No.619 Sqn RAF

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No.62 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 28th July 1916
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1964

Inseperato - Unexpectedly

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No.62 Sqn RAF

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No.64 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1916
Fate : Disbanded 16th June 1967

Tenax proposite - Firmness of purpose

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No.64 Sqn RAF

Flew Mustangs from November 1944.

No.8 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st January 1915

Uspiam et passim - Everywhere unbounded

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No.8 Sqn RAF

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No.82 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th January 1917
Fate : Disbanded 10th July 1963
United Provinces

Super omnia ubique - Over all things everywhere

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No.82 Sqn RAF

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No.84 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th January 1917

Scorpiones pungunt - Scorpions sting

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No.84 Sqn RAF

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No.86 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1917
Fate : Disbanded 25th April 1946

Ad libertates volamus - We fly to freedom

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No.86 Sqn RAF

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No.88 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 24th July 1917
Fate : Disbanded 17th December 1962
Hong Kong

En garde - Be on your guard

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No.88 Sqn RAF

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No.90 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 8th October 1917
Fate : Disbanded 1st March 1965

Celer - Swift

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No.90 Sqn RAF

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No.92 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1917
Fate : Disbanded 1st October 1994
East India

Aut pugna aut morere - Either fight or die

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No.92 Sqn RAF

92 Squadron was formed in the First World War, as a squadron of the Royal Flying Corps, on 1st September 1917. It flew Pups, Spads and SE5s during the war, becoming an RAF squadron on the formation of the RAF on 1st April 1918, before being disbanded on 7th August 1919. On the outbreak of hostilities of World War Two, 92 Sqn reformed on 10th October 1939, flying Blenheims before converting to Spitfires. It transferred to North Africa, and for some time flew as part of 244 Wing RAF. After the war, the squadron was disbanded on 30th December 1946. On 31st January 1947, the former 91 Squadron was redesignated 92 Squadron, flying the Meteor before re-equipping with the Sabre and then the Hunter. While flying the Hunter in 1960, the squadron was designated as the RAF's aerobatic squadron, with the name Blue Diamonds, a name the squadron carried on after tranferring to the Lightning. The squadron then re-equipped with Phantoms, before being disbanded on 1st July 1991. It was reformed from a rserve squadron on 23rd September 1992, and became No.92 (Reserve) Squadron, flying the Hawk aircraft before being disbanded once more on 1st October 1994.

Battle of Britain History Timeline : 24th September
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
24September1940Canadian Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. Bryson of 92 Squadron, was Killed.
24September1940Feldwebel Hans Stechmann of JG 3 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Gefreiter Kaspar Amhausend of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Hauptmann Günther Frhr. von Maltzahn of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Hauptmann Wolfgang Lippert of II./Jagdgeschwader 27 was awarded the Knight's Cross
24September1940Leutnant Karl Roos of JG 53 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Luftwaffe lost Two ME109, One ME110, on eJU88. One DO215. Two DO17
24September1940Major Adolf Galland of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
24September1940Number of aircraft available to the Royal Air Force for service on this day was 698 with 380 Hurricanes, 233 Spitfires, 58 Blenheims, amd 19 Defiants and 8 Gladiators
24September1940Oberleutnant Anton Mader of JG 2 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Hans (Assi) Hahn of 4./Jagdgeschwader 2 was awarded the Knight's Cross
24September1940Oberleutnant Helmut Bennemann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Helmut Bennemann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Helmut Kühle of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Herbert Ihlefeld of LG 2 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Leesmann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Karl-Heinz Leesmann of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Michael Sonner of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
24September1940Oberleutnant Ulrich Steinhilper of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Oberleutnant Ulrich Steinhilper of JG 52 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Polish Battle of Britain pilot, P/O W. J. Glowacki of 605 and 145 Squadrons, was Killed.
24September1940Royal Air Force lost Five aircraft with two pilots killed
24September1940Unteroffizier Adolf Benzinger of JG 51 shot down a Hurricane
24September1940Unteroffizier Eberhard von Boremski of JG 3 shot down a Blenheim
24September1940Unteroffizier Fritz Schweser of JG 54 shot down a Spitfire
24September1940Unteroffizier Hugo Dahmer of JG 26 shot down a Hurricane
Battle of Britain Timeline of Related Info : 24th September
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
24September1941Former Czech Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt A. Dvorak of 310 Squadron, was Killed.
24September1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O V. M. Bright of 229 Squadron, was Killed.
24September2002Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/Lt. H. P. F. Patten of 64 Squadron, Passed away.

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